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I should rename this post “Time Warp.”  I started it in May 2008 and this morning–in response to some Facebook exchanges–resurrected it.  Maybe I will begin a series called “Time Warp,” though, and any photos no more than 20 years old–to pick an arbitrary boundary and to keep the series from becoming ancient time warp which could be its own thing– . . . any photos you wish to contribute no more than two decades old would be welcome.   Maybe I gave up on this post six years back because I had too many unanswered questions.

Anyhow, to plunge back in . . . Robert Silva and Harold Tartell provided foto of Manhasset from way back, when it sported a flying horse on its stack . . . .  I assumed this vessel was long ago scrapped.  I’m also assuming the location of this shot can be pegged by the two LNG tanks in the background.

 

Here’s another shot of the vessel (1958) (or 1952) in transition, I presume, sent along by Robert Silva.

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Here’s a photo I took in 2008:  a different small tankship Mostank (1950) maneuvers close to a tanker.  I don’t know if Galahad is still in service, and

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Here in Arthur Kill to resupply, I suppose,  Mostank . . . M O S being Marine Oil Service.  Mostank shows up as registered until at least a year ago.  Emma Miller now serves the sixth boro.

Here’s where the time warp impinges on this post.  Great Gull was around still six or seven or eight years ago.  Time flies.  The Gull has flown south.

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Back then, John B. Caddell was still working.  Is she still intact?

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Nathan E. Stewart was still in town and here moving Mary A. Whalen to the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

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The unique Odin still worked here, and

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Weddell Sea was still known as Scott C.

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All photos here by will Van Dorp unless otherwise attributed.

 

 

Kirbyfication, which looks

like this on Norwegian Sea, is only one transformation, although if you asked me to personify and interpret, I’d say Norwegian looks positively

mortified in these fotos.  “OMG!!  I can’t bear bare   . . .

myself, can’t bear to see this,” she seems to say.

Here’s the changes from Barbara C (October 2010) to

Arabian Sea sand stack decorations (March 2012) to

this past weekend.

Others, like Miss Yvette take things much more in stride from  here (third foto down) to June 2011

to yesterday.

Heron transforms from this March 2011 foto to

this one last week.  And a year from now, as she plys waters off Equatorial Guinea . . . what will that look like?

Sun Road was clearly not always known that way, although

one of my sources was of no value.

For a thrilling transformation story, check out The Skipper & the Eagle, which relates how Horst Wessel became Eagle back in 1946.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

If you like to hear Jefferson Airplane, click here:  their lyric based on a John Wyndham sci-fi novel goes “Life is change.  How it differs from the rocks . . .”

So  . . . the bright sunshine and 45+ degree temperature coaxed me out to take some fotos, and soon I’m having a conversation with a gentleman whose first thought was wind power device was deck-mounted equipment on the reddish tanker.  Clearly here . . .  t-o-w-e-r   rhymes with power and not lawn mower.  I’m guessing it to be the tallest structure in Bayonne.    Any idea what Manhattan’s first skyscraper was and where?  It lasted only three years (1853–6) before it burnt down.

It’s definitely land-based.  But I thought I could have some fun creating

some alternative-powered shipping, like a wind turbine barge  DoubleSkin 303.

How about a Jane A. Bouchard with a huge air prop, or

this on an extra-tall Quantico Creek?

Ditto Greenland Sea?

Or a turbine atop the tower of the newly-minted Mediterranean Sea?

Closer up, this is what the hub looks like.

Some of the parts are US-made;  others come from Austria.  Here are some introductory  technical details.  If I read Leitwind’s homepage correctly, this is their first turbine delivered to the US.  Here are even more technical details, again from a New Jersey publication.

Northern New York state has a surprisingly large number of such turbines, as documented in tugster here, and “salties” have been delivering components into the upper Midwest through the St. Lawrence and into the Great Lakes, as Marlene Green, shown here . . . although I caught her running empty.  The five states that currently have the highest percentage of their electric power generated by turbine are:  Iowa, the Dakotas, Minnesota, and Kansas.  Atlantic City has five turbines.  Are there others in NJ?  And Staten Island . . . the idea of wind turbines atop Fresh Kills has certainly been discussed.

As of this writing, I’ve not seen any NY papers mention the Bayonne tower.  Hmm.

Oh, the first “skyscraper”  was Latting Observatory, standing 315 feet.  To learn more, click here.   This bit of erudition comes compliments of Tom Flagg, who is also responsible for this great but maybe slow-loading document of the bygone era of marine rail on the west side of Manhattan.  Thanks, Tom.

Some folks do spring cleaning;  I do winter culling.  And have been doing a lot of it, including in my foto library.  Considering the library as a whole, it’s constantly in flux . . . stuff out; better stuff-I hope–in.  Many quotes say this;  my favorite version is “you cannot step into the same river twice.”

Same is true of a harbor; what vessels inhabited it when I first paid attention are no longer here, at least not in the same way.  Take Odin, about which I’ve heard a lot of chatter this week.  Great name.  Perfect candidate for an award for eccentricity, but I smiled every time I saw Odin.   I never saw the closest vessel to her in DNA, the ill-fated Red Wing.  You can tell this is the older Odin because the house rests on a hydraulic ram.

 Here her house has front legs.

Here’s Odin, house down, bunkering a Princess vessel.

Dean Reinauer has also left the sixth boro; she traveled out on the back of Blue Marlin last summer.  Where she is today, I’m SURE she’ll see no snowfall like this, taken a few years back over by Howland Hook.

Ditto Great Gull . . . down in Venezuela . . . no snow.  I recall fondly how excited I was when I first saw Great Gull, turns out built by the same folks who built barges for Europe as part of the Marshall Plan.

And the ORANGE June K.  I know she’s still around as Sarah Ann.  But that original color was almost institutional, almost spring time.

And then there’s Rosemary McAllister, now working on lease down south without her last name and with an all-white stack.    Her christening was a seminal bowsprite/tugster collaboration.

She worked in the harbor for too short a spell, from my POV, before migrating to Houston, but what do I know about the economics.

Scott C is now Weddell Sea.  Dorothy Elizabeth (star  . . . well, an extra . . .  of Carlito’s Way) has now been scrapped.

Finally, there’s Kristin . . . , once with a telescoping house like Odin, now scrapped.

I have others, but it’s amazing how much changes in five years of  observing the harbor.  All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Given my vintage, the sound that personifies change for me is this song by Jefferson Airplane.  

New York’s sixth boro has its variety of marine traffic and its icons, but this time of year in western Netherlands, a harvest flotilla delights the eyes . . . and wears out Fred Trooster’s camera-shutter finger.  Check out Fred’s fotos here.

Dorothy J. (1982slings  Jill A. Caddell (2011), a new floating drydock extension from Senesco Marine and  through the harbor on Friday . . .  I can’t make out the assist tug.  This foto thanks to John Watson.

Iron Wolf (1983) tows

once-used plastic.  If some folks think NYC has provocative statues, they should check out the ads around town for Manhattan Mini-Storage . . . like the one over on the west side of the East River in the background.

Miriam Moran (1979) here waits on Carvival Glory (Italy-built 2003, Panama-flagged) to ready herself for Canada.

Vernon C passes the Statue pulling

oil in a  barge with a complicated name.

Susan E. Witte (2004) assists Meagan Ann (1975).

Crow moves around some scows.

Crewman tests the boarding ramp as

APL Oman (Romania-built 2010, Singapore-flagged) allows Bruce A. McAllister (1974) to move in and

land the pilot to guide vessel into

Newark Bay.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Without even considering the upper house, I suspect the pins and “cheeks” of  Norwegian Sea. . . modify  the appearance of the vessel  christened as Leopardo Grande in 1976.

Morning sun gives glow to hull  of Cape Bird, named for geography in Antarctica, itself named for a crewman aboard a polar exploration vessel named Erebus.

Orange Sun . . . breezes past Fort Wadsworth side of the VZ Bridge and over the horizon in less than an hour, but thanks to SteveW for recalling an incident with the orange juice  tanker just over three years ago here.

Miss Gill, launched 1970 and relaunched 2008, (I’m curious about her namesake) is top horsepower boat for Norfolk Tugs.

Stern portion of the barge (name?) towed through the sixth boro Sunday by Navigator.

Conrad S and Norwegian Sea pass near Snug Harbor.

Serendipitous gull along with unique upper house structures of Paul T. Moran and tanker Butterfly in Gravesend Bay.  I embedded a link to the wrong vessel Butterfly here.

Evening Mist has turned to morning frost!

Jennifer Turecamo with dry bulk barge Adelaide . . .  carrying heavy dry stuff since 1963!

Now I’m stretching the title, but this is the closest up I could zoom as WMEC-615 Reliance passes West Bank Light and approaches the Narrows at this moment, and moments before . .  this

was my first glimpse as Reliance passed between Butterfly and APL Sardonyx.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Winston Churchill said:  “If you’re going through hell, keep going.”  I’ll add .  .  . doesn’t matter where you go, just gogogo, hither and yon, yon and hither.

Bowsprite and I did not collaborate on this . . . or even confer in any way.  I’m delighted by our different takes on the same scene.

In less than a mile of navigable water between Vane Brothers’ Elk River and the Staten Island shore in the distance, a lot can go on.  Elk River and DoubleSkin 37 lighter Cape Bird from the portside while Barbara C (not sure the barge) does starboard.  Then Eagle Service–just off Blue Sapphire with barge Energy 13502 heads north and beyond them, APL Sardonyx heads for sea.    Whatever lies or moves west of Sardonyx, I can’t tell.

A short time earlier, GT’s Navigator with barge on the wire . . .  meant only one thing .  . .

more mystery parts bound between Narragansett Bay and the Chesapeake.  This isn’t a part of a Cadillac, but my immediate thought seeing these barges is this song by Johnny Cash.  Michelle Shocked’s version, my favorite, I can’t find.

Sheer beauty and joy came next . . . Orange Sun, headed back to the equator for another load of that ambrosia from Brasil.

Adding to the traffic described earlier . . . way over on the Staten Island side Galahad moves in to drop the hook, while nearer, Energy 13502 slips past Cape Bird and DoubleSkin 37.

A fairly new Desh Mahima lies at anchor while (also fairly new)  Firefighter 2 waits at HomePort.

Doubleclick enlarges ost fotos;  try it here to see a crewman from Blue Sapphire taking a brush to the Plimsoll marks?

Outside the Narows, Paul T Moran lighters off Butterfly.

APL Sardonyx heads for sea (interestingly . . . for Antwerp, just as Bowsprite’s Barrington Island is!!) while Torm Lene gets escorted in the Arthur Kill by Gramma Lee T Moran.

Homeported in Kittery, Maine . . .  WMEC-615 Reliance slips in past Fort Wadsworth.  Can you see over a dozen people on her decks? And what does the EO or ED just below the wheelhouse mean?

Temperatures pushed 40 today, and it was a joy to walk the Bay Ridge Shore.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

What happens in the harbor as the sleet flies?  The same stuff that always happens.  Here Barbara C lighters a tanker aptly named Winter.   Off Winter‘s stern, container vessel NordAtlantic arrives, bound for Global.  Doubleclick to enlarge and see these today.

Marion Moran heads for the Buttermilk, apparently between Scott Turecamo with barge New Hampshire and Linda Moran with barge Houston.

Odin pushes Aqua.

Gramma Lee T Moran and Kimberly Turecamo escort bulker Thalassini Axia into Red Hook.  And Miss Callie stays fishing.

Here’s a closer-up of Linda Moran framed by the fossilized cranes over by the Red Hook Ikea.  Click here to see what was replaced by Ikea’s parking lot . . . ok . . . I should just forget about it maybe?

That’s Buchanan 1, over by some empty Buchanan scows.

And the scrap keeps coming out of Newtown Creek, here pushed by Crow.  Can someone identify the tall building with the green pitched roof near the left margin of the foto?

All fotos taken in the sleety drizzle Tuesday  by Will Van Dorp.

Lightering  from Ocean Chariot onto The Patriot goes on uninterrupted by the brisk wind out of the north . . . gusts to 20 mph . . . .  It’s just another

day on the sixth boro. Stavanger Bell gets a call from the Miller service boat.   In the background skyline, note the “V” shaped twin cranes . . . . yup . . . . that’s the current height of building at One World Trade Center.

Here are two other shots  of Stavanger Bell with Scott C (?)

attached to The Patriot barge.  That might be  Erie Service and Energy ??? barge taking the stern of Stavanger Bell.

Also at anchor, Genmar Concord awaits a provisioning visit from

the unique, the peerless, the siblingless Twin Tube.

The small boat here headed out the Narrows . . .  could be a wet and bumpy ride, but still just another

day in the sixth boro.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Keeping with tradition:  here’s #57.  Remember, doubleclick enlarges.

Unidentified kayaks foreground, and middleground from left to right: Layla Rene, Sea Bear, dredge Florida; and background, King Dorian (misspell of durian?).

Unidentified crew boat heading away and Barbara C approaching.

Kimberly Turecamo westbound.

Elk River westbound.

Pati R Moran headed to an anchorage.

W. O. Decker passes W O tanker called Sharon Sea.

Sarah Ann and unnamed blue sailboat painted almost DonJon blue.

McAllister Girls pushing dirt.

More of the kayakers taking Lucy Reinauer‘s stern, making helmsman a smidgeon nervous, I reckon.

Falcon and Houma tandem effort.

Unnamed Moran tug leading Caribbean Princess.

Carnival Glory foreground and some unidentified tugs in the distance.

Sorry about all the unidentified vessels today.  Maybe someone can help.

Meanwhile, some stories from the NYTimes this morning:  disputed waters between China and Japan AND Seamen’s Institute leaves Manhattan for Newark.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

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My job . . . Summer AND Fall 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

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My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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