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Lots of images you can try to identify today, but I’ll hold any further info until tomorrow.

First . . .  this vessel will be visible and will be an interesting subject of photographs from many points along the Hudson next month,  February.  Clue:  Note the hull  color.

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Unrelated to the top foto . . . any guesses about this and

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and this from the same vessel and

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this from the same fleet?   Both vessels are occasional visitors in the sixth boro.

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And finally . . . from a secret salt, a foto easy to identify.  My question in whether there’s any news about this incident.

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You’ll have some answers tomorrow.

Finally . . . here are some of my favorite ice pics on the Hudson taken a few years back by Paul Strubeck.

And here’s hat’s off to my Canadian cousins . . . if case you missed this late addition to yesterday’s post.

Click here for an account of gallivants in and around Ocracoke and Hatteras Inlets as well as my connection to these waters.  Beaufort Inlet–near Cape Lookout–is scheduled for some depth maintenance these days with Marinex Construction excavating what McFarland count not extract.  Katherine Weeks enters the inlet from sea with a light scow.

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The only USACE presence I saw was Snell.  USACE awarded Marinex the contract to subtract a half million tons of sand from beneath these waves.

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I believe this is cutterhead/pipleine dredge Savannah, connected by pipeline to this

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scow and loading equipment.

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When Katherine tows the loaded scow out–here past Sea Quest II, a dive boat (more on that later)

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Na Hoku-formerly a K-Sea vessel

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tails.  The Sea Knight helicopter

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just happened overhead.  I’d love the view from a helicopter here.

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Once through the narrow inlet, Katherine heads out for the dumping area and Na Hoku returns to its holding station.

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Who knew the inlet could be this busy . . . l to r:  Grace Moran, Aurora, Na Hoku, and Salamina1.  More on the last one on that list tomorrow.   Aurora, listed as a sulphur carrier, carries PotashCorp colors.

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Potash Corp has their big mine about 35 miles from here, as the pelicans fly.

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Chief is clearly a Marinex tug.

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I’m not sure the ID of the inbound vessel here passing Chief, here heading out to the dredge.

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I can’t say for certain about that dive boat early on and whether the divers had been on Queen Anne’s Revenge, but there’ve been lots of salvage activity around the Inlet in recent days.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

I took all these fotos this morning.  First, here’s the ashoremost portion of John B Caddell in the parking lot waterside of Edgewater Drive, roughly across from the Clifton*** Staten Island Railroad stop.  After being delivered from RTC Shipbuilding in Camden, NJ in mid-December 1941, she has come to her end.  Most of her life she delivered petroleum products, not water.  Click here for a foto of her at work in the sixth boro six years ago.

Looking eastward, one might imagine a beautiful day under dramatic clouds, with the current pilot boat New York in the spotlight, in

an otherwise unusually empty Upper Bay.

An especially clean street here belies

debris left strewn on the street showing how high the surge rose and

leaving behind vile stuff like dozens (!) of vials of blood . . . with recognizable names on them!

Alice Austen house, about a mile farther south,

was spared, but just.

Neighbors on lower land began the cleanup.

And the Kills and Upper Bay, devoid of traffic, had a few vessels checking navigation channels.

Has anyone gotten “aftermath” fotos of Binghamton to share?  Here, here, and here are my fotos of that vessel post-Irene.

To reiterate, I found the scattered vials with blood along Edgewater Drive very disturbing.  I called 311.

From a mariner’s perspective whose truck got flooded while he was working afloat, click hawsepiper here.

For a report on the storm from a high-rise over the East River, click here for Vlad and Johna’s blog.

*** Six months ago another vessel washed up on another beach called Clifton here.

We spend so much of our lives waiting.  I guess it’s one of those unavoidables, like taxes and death . . . Ineluctable, if you want to be pedantic.   Yesterday, while waiting for high tide, a helicopter dropped in on the beached fishing trawler.  Click here for a bather flashing the crew. . .  hey, if you live on Clifton Beach and want to meet the unexpected visitors, how else do you get their attention?

At high tide this morning, another attempt to pull the trawler off the beach resulted in another parted towing line.

Meanwhile, holding the lead is Port Arthur-built, Cape Town-modified Ocean Pride.  Note the additions to make her beamier.

Here’s the muscle (Smit Amandla, ex-John Ross) that parts the towing lines.

Here crews of tug and supply vessel sort out the towing warp.

And 8000 miles to the northwest, Swan has not yet started loading.  Prepping and waiting is still going on, four days after I took these fotos.

But with a name like Swan and this time of year,

waiting is intended to be productive.

South African fotos by Colin Syndercombe;  sixth boro NYC fotos by Will Van Dorp.

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My job . . . Summer 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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