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I took these fotos two and a half years ago . . . February 2011, and posted others I took here.  But last night

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I read that the vessel is currently anchored just outside  Murmansk and the crew awaiting

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word on which among them will be charged with piracy.

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Maybe the crew can seek asylum in  . .  Michigan?

Another unrelated update:  Sailing Cargo . . .  New Yorkers can order Vermont products now to arrive by ship in late October.

Click here for an account of gallivants in and around Ocracoke and Hatteras Inlets as well as my connection to these waters.  Beaufort Inlet–near Cape Lookout–is scheduled for some depth maintenance these days with Marinex Construction excavating what McFarland count not extract.  Katherine Weeks enters the inlet from sea with a light scow.

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The only USACE presence I saw was Snell.  USACE awarded Marinex the contract to subtract a half million tons of sand from beneath these waves.

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I believe this is cutterhead/pipleine dredge Savannah, connected by pipeline to this

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scow and loading equipment.

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When Katherine tows the loaded scow out–here past Sea Quest II, a dive boat (more on that later)

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Na Hoku-formerly a K-Sea vessel

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tails.  The Sea Knight helicopter

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just happened overhead.  I’d love the view from a helicopter here.

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Once through the narrow inlet, Katherine heads out for the dumping area and Na Hoku returns to its holding station.

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Who knew the inlet could be this busy . . . l to r:  Grace Moran, Aurora, Na Hoku, and Salamina1.  More on the last one on that list tomorrow.   Aurora, listed as a sulphur carrier, carries PotashCorp colors.

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Potash Corp has their big mine about 35 miles from here, as the pelicans fly.

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Chief is clearly a Marinex tug.

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I’m not sure the ID of the inbound vessel here passing Chief, here heading out to the dredge.

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I can’t say for certain about that dive boat early on and whether the divers had been on Queen Anne’s Revenge, but there’ve been lots of salvage activity around the Inlet in recent days.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s the engine order telegraph and a bit of uniform.  Guess the vessel?  Doubleclick enlarges fotos.

Here’s more signage.  Identification later in the post.

And a closeup of the topsail furling system of Etoile, one of the French schooners.

More brass and brightwork on Etoile.

And the guard of the passerelle.

Not far away, crew on this vessel looked less inviting.  Guess the nationality?

Canadian.  She’s guarding HMCS Iroquoisbuilt in the same Quebec town as Mathilda!

Here was Iroquois last Wednesday converging with other vessels in the sixth boro, and

here she is nose to nose with USCGC (WLB 202) Willow, alternatively captured by bowsprite.

From the bridge deck of Argus, looking over the stern and toward the west . . . Governors Island and New Jersey beyond.   Along the horizon near the south tip of Governors Island . . . those are the cranes of Bayonne and even fainter beyond that Port Elizabeth.

Here’s the view from the forward positioned bridge.  Back in 2007 I caught these fotos of Oslo Express, the only bridge-forward container vessel I can recall seeing in the sixth boro.

Here’s a bit more info on Argus.  My tour guide and globalsecurity.org describe Argus as the only vessel in the world to have a CT scanner.    As it turns out, she also has a cat.  This is Simon, and yes . . . Simon went off duty decades ago, but his healing presence in the hospital lives on.  More sobering, Argus has patient monitors that allow patients to have a chance to survive IED-caused triple amputations.

Nearing dusk, yesterday afternoon . . . the Brooklyn vessels as seen from the water:  stern of Seneca, Shirane, the French Belle Poule and Etoile, and Cuauhtemoc.

Which brings me back to the Mexican ship.  Some of the cadets I spoke with finally explained this flag . . . it’s the captain’s personal flag . . . personal pirate flag, actually is what the cadet said.

Aboard were over 250 crew, who started their morning yesterday polishing brass before they let any visitors up the pasillo.

And the vessel was immaculate.

Below the stack here, I’m told, is a 1250 hp Cat.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who needs to get to another job now.

I thought you spelled it “okracoke,” as in cherry coke,” caffeinated but slightly more viscous and less fruity, she said.

Names and spelling change less frequently than shoals and shorelines.  Local Indians called the place “wokokkon” and who knows what Verrazano and Raleigh called it.  And Blackbeard . . . people originally called him  Captain Drummond before he took on a string of noms de corsair.

I photographed this 1970 National Geographic map where it was posted aboard ferry Carteret, since it shows my birthplace (Belhaven) and its proximity to both inlets at Ocracoke and Hatteras.  My father had imagined buying farmland inland from Swan Quarter;  now I’m thinking it’s a place for me to retire, whenever that becomes possible.

The yellow pickup on the foredeck carries a supply of wheel chocks.  Intermodal shipping with trucks on decks:  bowsprite should love this.

The 24-vessel ferry system also hosts an ongoing water monitoring effort called Ferry Mon.  In a separate strand of multitasking, ferry crews keep a lookout for marine life in distress.

Midpoint in the trip between Cedar Island and Ocracoke we crossed southbound

ferry Pamlico.

Note the two-floor passenger cabin.  Carteret was launched from Halter Equitable, the same yard that launched the sixth boro’s tug Aegean Sea and ferries Barberi and Newhouse.

Chincoteague has its ponies, and Ocracoke has its “bankers.”

We traveled from the north end of Ocracole to Hatteras aboard Croatoan.  Note the Fedex truck.

As we crossed Hatteras Inlet, we saw three small fishing boats inbound

hurrying to the dock with a catch.

Long and narrow with lots of  sheer, the boats resemble

New England lobster boats, although these “banks” boat have less beam, sharp chines, and smaller houses.

Can anyone identify the fish?

Midpoint in the trip between Ocracoke and Hatteras we were tailed by small fishing boats and

crossed southbound ferry FriscoPatti-built like the tug Duty.  I’d love to see a foto of Frisco hauled.

Let’s call it quits here.  More “road fotos” tomorrow.

All fotos here by Will Van Dorp.

Meanwhile, unrelated, how long do you imagine a powerboat would take between Hatteras and NYC?  Your guess?  Now watch this youtube on the consumption of 600 gallons of fuel.

Unrelated:  What happened to the vessel recently removed from the James River ghost fleet?  Read about it here.

And finally, here from Robert of Oil-Electric is an article about last summer’s whales … and an elephant, ladybug, and rails.

Digging requires claws.  Claws inspire primal dread.  Dredge machines seem beclawed in groteque ways.  And they’re huge, like the ape that scrambled up the Empire State building.  I waited long but in vain to line up these talons and the tower in the distance, but I’m sure you can visualize the effect.  Imagine the headline:  dredge machine grapples its way as the large ape did first in 1933.  Please keep those climbing beasts sequested in the southern Upper Bay of the sixth boro … or farther.

Call it ooze, mud, or fluff … no matter.  Ick!  Dispose of it please,  Captain D.

It spatters when it ends its route from bottom of the harbor to bottom of the scow.

I’d be very nervous walking there.  I know it’s safe, but irrational fears–like ones that make you run in the dark or for me swim quick in dark, deep water–would surface with me cause me to look up.

How many cubic miles of bottom  have been removed in the

past century of pantagruelish bottom removal?

Some years back I wrote about a dredger off Jones Beach here, which I was reminded of when I heard the dredger Vespucci was troubled by pirates off Cameroon (my home from 1975–7, last of my Peace Corps years). See another article here.   How dare these pirates . . . I guess they don’t have my dredgerphobias.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who understands the efficacy, sometimes,  of  claws and other grotesqueries.

Ooooolala!  What’s this?  Make your way to Atlantic Basin ASAP;  click here for tickets … only two shows Saturday (tonight!)  and two Sunday left, before the floating burlesque sails over the horizon.

Staging this burlesque is barquentine Gazela, whose first life fishing for cod continued until the year Armstrong stepped onto the moon.  Yessir, this fine vessel served as a dory boat until 1969!

Up to 35 dories (many built in the Merrimack Valley north of Cape Ann)  like the one in the foreground here served “mothership” Gazela.

Daytime tours of Gazela as well as nighttime entertainment can be had only through this weekend!  This is also the last chance (for a while) to see Mary Whalen at Pier 11.  For directions to Pier 11, click here.

So I went to the show “The Seven Deadly Seas” the other night.  Before the show, the devil’s advocate (of the Flaming Cherries) emerges from the nether portions of the ship, and

the city darkens as the band begins to play.  See the twinkling Manhattan lights off in the distance.

Feisty bawds dueling over everything

can be charmed only by

dancing

and more dancing and

still more dancing that sometimes lead to …  lost clothing.

Come learn the story of Calico Jack, who imagined he had all the skills needed to thrive on Wall Street.

Bring a dozen friends and make it the most memorable night of the summer, the summer of Atlantic Basin as prime offshore Broadway.

Will Calico Jack swing here, or is it Camp Butner FCC for him?

Don’t miss the boat.

Fotos by Eric Lorgus (some taken in Philadephia)  and Will Van Dorp.

Can you guess the connection between the three fotos that follow?    Gazela –540 hp, the oldest wooden square-rigger sailing in the United States, built in Portugal in 1901 (?) to fish cod, and Philadelphia’s tall ship.

Pati R. Moran, 5100 hp and built in Maine in 2007

and “pirate Calico Jack, who, unbeknownst to his crew, has decided toget out of the pirate business, and has sailed to Wall Street to make some business deals, secure a401k, and plan his retirement.”

Once more, Gazela,

Pati R, and

… who’s this with Calico Jack!

Well, buy your tickets here for “The Seven Deadly Seas.”  Read a review from the Philadelphia CityPaper here.

Bringing Gazela and crew/acting troupe to Atlantic Basin is the result of hard work of PortSide NewYork.  “About bringing her to NYC, Eric Lorgus, President of Gazela, had this to say, ‘Tall ships have found it increasinglyhard to visit this place, and I’ve been trying to crack NYC foryears. We really appreciate the efforts PortSide has made on ourbehalf. Carolina herself has pursued this will tenacity and zeal.’

Carolina Salguero, Director of PortSide NewYork says about the visit ‘PortSide was founded to bring the BlueSpace, or the waterpart of the waterfront, to life in New York City. We are excited that Gazela is coming, because tall ships are education and inspiration afloat. We hope her visit opens the door to more visits by more boats—of all types—at this pier and other piers.We are encouraged by recent government initiatives focusing onthe water itself and grateful that the EDC [New York City Economic Development Corp] has made Pier 11 available to us for Gazela’s visit.’
Gazela will be open for deck tours during the day. These arerun on an open-house basis. To defray costs of the trip, a modest $5 donation is being requested, but is not mandatory. The cabaretalso subsidizes the trip.”

As to the connection between Gazela and Pati R., I’m leaving that open to your guesses for a few days yet.

See press release here.   Show dates are August 19–22, 8 pm and 10 pm shows, for a total of eight shows.

Fotos 1, 2, 4, 5, and 7 by Will Van Dorp.  Show fotos are compliments of Peter Gaffney of Cabaret Red Light.

Coney Island has such a distinct culture that the sixth boro (the watery parts between the five terra-boros) should just annex it.

Very introductory but fascinating  history of Coney’s evolution can be had in these short articles by Lisa Iannucci, Jeffrey Stanton, and Laurence Aurbach Jr. One theme of these articles is that Coney has a rich history of  inverting the genteel norms, entertaining rather than uplifting, dissolving the distinction between audience and performer, and (for a holiday) legitimizing some folks’ ideas of the illegitimate.  (Some of those phrases come from the lecture by Goeff Zylstra recently at Alongtheshore.)  It sounds like the alongshore of Coney makes a candidate for the capital of the sixth boro, and the Mermaid Parade its official holiday.

May these few fotos whet your appetite!  Doubleclick enlarges.  More tomorrow.  I took this foto almost immediately after arriving yesterday, and I was so happy I could have gone home satisfied.  Mermaids exude such grace!

Dick Zigun, mayor of Coney,  leads off the 20th annual parade.  Thanks for ALL your efforts, Dick and crew.  Oceans of appreciation to all the performers!

King Neptune and Queen Mermaid aka Lou Reed and Laurie Anderson ride the ceremonial cart.

Charm and

ferocity,

Fun for all ages, youngsters

of all ages:  THIS is the circus that has come to Coney.

Beplumed posteriors and

profiles,  they have given me a smile I can’t erase for days, months even.

Those black smudges . . . yeah, the parade did have its dirty parts, but for that, your patience until tomorrow is required.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Each week the New Yorker runs one new cartoon lacking a caption.  People send in their cleverness, and the winner is announced a few weeks later along with that week’s new caption contest.  But when Joel Milton sent this foto yesterday, it seemed to me a perfect image to launch a tugster caption contest.  The prize . . . recognition of your wit among your peers?  A free one-year subscription to tugster?

So, have at it.  Some background  (or dry ground in this case):  this “slip” is located between Queens and Manhattan in the East river.  The island is officially Belmont Island, but some–like me–prefer to call it U Thant Island, named for the United Nations Secretary General, who used to see it right across the stream from the UN buildings. Ironically, the speedster seems to have parked right under an arch shown in foto #2 of this very old tugster post.  Also, doubleclick on the foto to enlarge it, and you’ll see the arch is very popular place for cormorants, known for their voracious appetites, intake,  and therefore output . . . .

Caption??

The Peace Boat was in the sixth boro in June last year.  Yesterday thanks to Mage, who sent me in the direction of  Maritime Matters, I learned that earlier this month, off Yemen, the Peace Boat

outran and escaped from pirates!  Bravo.  That almost calls for a renaming of the vessel.  Any ideas?

The rest of this post is devoted to enigmas.  Like . . . anyone know this monument aka denkmal?  Answer follows.

This drooling clamshell could engulf my car.  Guess the location?

This weather foto–I’ll call the weather stunning if not the foto–makes predictions easy.  Vessel is Escort, moving coal into the Hackensack river.

At the point I took this foto, I had figured out the talent, but initially I rubbed my eyes and panicked about the cruel effects of aging.

And this last foto . . . it’s a family foto and I’m looking to identify the year and make of car.  The man on the left is my great-grandfather, not a citizen of this country, but the foto was taken somewhere in the Dakotas in the 1930s.  Please, make and model?

All fotos except the first and last by Will Van Dorp.  Thanks to Joel for foto and Mage for lead.

The denkmal .  .  is a propeller of Intrepid, the carrier, CV-11.   Which reminds me:  the fleet arrives on Wednesday this week.  And the dredging was happening (seems always to be happening) in the Manhattan Passenger Terminal, where dredging is always happening.

More on the iPatch later.  For now, can you identify this foto from the bridge of a self-described flagship?  Clues lurk.  I had a tour aboard this morning from G, a biology teacher (among other things) from Brazil.  Notice the glass container below the gauge mounted on the window pillar.

The flag is Tibet, and the globe . . . a gift from the Dalai Lama.

The hull of this repurposed ex-Scottish Fisheries Protection Vessel (FPV) Westra is painted black.  Dimensions are 196′ x 36′ x 14′, capable of 16.5 kts, layover in the sixth boro until Saturday on a voyage that has seen such stops as Pitcairn Island and the Galapagos.

It’s Steve Irwin, flagship of

Sea Shepherd, what Raffi Khatchadourian‘s November 2007 New Yorker article called “Neptune’s Navy.”

Tours run daily from 10 until 3.  Fundraiser Friday night . . . details here.  Here’s the letter of support from the Dalai Lama.  Izod logo just happens to be at the end of the pier, but –hey–maybe they’re supporters too.

Click here for a report on the loss of a portion of the Sea Shepherd fleet–Ady Gil– on January 7, 2010.  A Sea Shepherd hero is Henry Morgan, privateer, who fought fire with fire, or piracy with piracy.

All fotos, Will Van Dorp.

For an update on Captain Bethune of Ady Gil, now called a political prisoner of the Japanese, click here.

iPatch . . .  just a thought, a name I hereby coin.  This is my vision of a new miracle product by the folks who brought us iMac, iPod, iPhone, and iPad . . .  the iPatch . . . a hightech gadget–a panacea, if you will–that will restore balance between the species, mutual respect among the peoples of the earth, rid the seas of pirates and plastic patches,  . . .  what else . . ..

Disclosure:  Not owning a TV, I’ve never seen an episode of Whale Wars, although I have seen its parody on YouTube.

Uhhh . . . Johnny Depp’s pirate ship?

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My job . . . Summer AND Fall 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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