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Quick update on National Maritime Day from Belfast, Maine.  What got me here was this vessel, today a platform for tours between here and the Arctic mostly.  Wanderbird started this stage of her life after fishing for 30 years, cod and herring.  The shoes in the foreground reflect its origins  . . . launched in 1963 as a beam trawler in Maassluis, Holland.

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What enforces this sign is . . .

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this.  David put the specs up on yesterday’s post.

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The “towed” vehicle will be observed from here.

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Also on hand are Maine Maritime Academy vessels.  Here’s tug Pentagoet, training vessel powered

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by two sets of Detroit diesels.  Note this is one set, two blocks mounted together.

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And the wheelhouse . . . shows TLC.

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Another MMA vessel is Ted, as in

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Ted Nusunginya, revealing its previous Alaska work and soon to be renamed for an MMA alum.  Vessel Ned is a classroom, a lab, in fact, for courses such as Navigation, Celestial Navigation . . . and more.

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The pilot boat is

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Florida built.

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If you have a chance, you might fall in love with Belle fast.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

OK . .  I stole am borrowing the title from what I’d call a “must-read” book by John McPhee . . .  from two decades back.  But this small boat, identified

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here–double click–is

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doing just that, no matter the stormy weather.

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See the pilot boat here . . . approaching the incoming container ship, which is looking for a port.

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The pilot boat descends into a trough starboard the vessel, SS El Morro. . . .      Sun Shipbuilding launched . . . 1974.   See hull # 666.   Here it approaches its namesake. . . .

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where–standing off a sentry box–aka–una garita waits Honcho, a 1975 tug, also looking for a ship, along with

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its newest fleetmate, Handy Three.   By the way, does anyone have a foto of Handy Three passing through New York City  . . . the sixth boro . . .  late last spring on its maiden voyage between Cleveland and San Juan?

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If so, please get in touch . .  see email along upper left.

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All fotos yesterday by Will Van Dorp, in the last half hour before catching a ride back to NYC . . .  aka the sixth boro.

Since noon it’s been raining, but the sunrise brought this sequence:  CSAV Romeral outbound for Baltimore and one of the most beautiful work vessels of the sixth boro inbound.  Also, that’s Vane’s Magothy in the distance.  And for outatowners, way in the distance is Coney Island, home of the mermaid parade on the summer solstice.

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Pilot No. 1 New York first splashed into the waters in May 1972.

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She’s 180 feet loa,  gorgeous, and “related” to a good dozen varied regulars in the sixth boro.

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Here she passes between  European Spirit and Fort Wadsworth light.    Given that New York comes off a Great Lakes shipyard

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in the tiny town of Marinette, Wisconsin . . .

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she shares that Green Bay/Lake Michigan place of origin with

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Vane’s Brandywine and three Staten Island Ferry vessels (Spirit of America, Marchi, Molinari).  See tugster posts features the following Marinette constructions.  Katherine Walker, Apache, Jennifer Miller, and Ellen McAllister.  Here’s Marinette’s current website.   Here’s Strong, another Marinette product I never expect to see, but clearly a forerunner of the Brandywine type tug.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who would love to see contemporary fotos of the vessels built in Wisconsin that made their way  into the navies of Vietnam, Ethiopia, Indonesia, and the Philippines.

Here’s my post-Sandy New York Pilot No. 1 foto.

Here was 20.  And this first foto is in fact mine:  16 m pilot boat America eastbound in the KVK last week.  But the rest of these fotos come thanks to G. Justin Zizes Jr, who earlier this weekend

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had a berth on Norwegian Jewel on a “cruise to nowhere,” aka a large ship gallivant on the high seas.  Justin caught these fotos from a balcony at an hour that I’m guessing most on board were asleep.   Arrival,

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beginning the climb,

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and departure of the pilot boat, soon just a few lights

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in the wee hours of this morning.

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Connect the dots . . . er . . .. lights and what do you get?

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Two more fotos from Justin:  Friday night departure, and

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Sunday morning return.

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Many thanks to Justin for these fotos.

 

I took all these fotos this morning.  First, here’s the ashoremost portion of John B Caddell in the parking lot waterside of Edgewater Drive, roughly across from the Clifton*** Staten Island Railroad stop.  After being delivered from RTC Shipbuilding in Camden, NJ in mid-December 1941, she has come to her end.  Most of her life she delivered petroleum products, not water.  Click here for a foto of her at work in the sixth boro six years ago.

Looking eastward, one might imagine a beautiful day under dramatic clouds, with the current pilot boat New York in the spotlight, in

an otherwise unusually empty Upper Bay.

An especially clean street here belies

debris left strewn on the street showing how high the surge rose and

leaving behind vile stuff like dozens (!) of vials of blood . . . with recognizable names on them!

Alice Austen house, about a mile farther south,

was spared, but just.

Neighbors on lower land began the cleanup.

And the Kills and Upper Bay, devoid of traffic, had a few vessels checking navigation channels.

Has anyone gotten “aftermath” fotos of Binghamton to share?  Here, here, and here are my fotos of that vessel post-Irene.

To reiterate, I found the scattered vials with blood along Edgewater Drive very disturbing.  I called 311.

From a mariner’s perspective whose truck got flooded while he was working afloat, click hawsepiper here.

For a report on the storm from a high-rise over the East River, click here for Vlad and Johna’s blog.

*** Six months ago another vessel washed up on another beach called Clifton here.

Fotos from Barbara at Rockaway Beach around 100th Street here.  Emergency message to folks on the boardwalk:  “Go inside, and no surfing.”

From Gary, East River looking toward the mouth of Newtown Creek and

toward the 59th Street Bridge.    No movement.

And finally, from L’amica dalla torre di orologio . . .  Hudson River . . . looking toward  the Statue of Liberty, who probably wishes she could hunker down behind her pedestal.   Geometrical structure to the left is the floating Battery Park City Ferry Terminal.   I’m not sure what contingencies exist for it during a surge, since it’s basically a hull.

Currently Captain of the Port has order vessels of a certain tonnage to leave the docks, as it’s safer for them to hang in the stream than stay affixed to a rigid structure.   So cruising in the North river now as sightseeing vessels,

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and the Sandy Hook pilot boats!

That’s the Erie Lackawanna Terminal Tower/Hoboken Terminal in the background.

USCG . . . off to respond to a recreational vessel that’s dragged its mooring?

And finally, back to Rockaway . .  as nightfalls.

Many thanks to Barbara, Gary, and L’amica for these fotos.  The worst is yet to come, I fear.  Stay inside and away from the tongues and talons of water that surge in.

And this just in . . . video from helicopter of USCG rescue of folks from HMS Bounty.

Sometimes along the road, I see things I don’t understand.    The first two fotos here, though, I can identify but just won’t right now.  Hazard guesses about this fish?

 . . . and the current usage of this vessel?  Answers soon.

This is a poor foto shot from the roadway where I couldn’t stop, but it looks like fishing weir tenders removing trapped fish?  Click to enlarge.

Here, from a place I could stop is a weir with nets visible.   I call them weirs, but maybe other terms are used along the mid-Atlantic coast

Here was my northbound conveyance . . . ferry Twin Capes, which I saw in the sixth boro here (fotos 4 and 5) two years ago.    Nah . . . it wasn’t lost or in fugitive mode;  it was headed for Caddell Dry Dock.

Now . . . I kid you not, but let me say I saw a ray in Delaware Bay (sounds like the beginning of a song?) but didn’t even try to take a foto.  Maybe that’s a ray’s mouth motif on the bow of that pilot boat, which just

retrieved the pilot from Fivelborg, Quebec-bound.  You need to see this foto of her on shipspotting!!

Following Fivelborg was this container ship, and I have no idea who she is.   Any ideas . . . 10 to 15 miles behind Fivelborg outbound Delaware Bay?

Here’s the Cape May Light with the wreckage of SS Atlantus off Sunset Beach.

If this is a second life for this vessel parked on the shellrock surfaced marina, what was first life?

Two roads diverged in the New Jersey bayou (and I don’t mean that pejoratively) , and my GPS had no idea where I was or where I should go, and squadrons of tabanus nigrovittatuses aka greenheads knew exactly where their blood food was.   Squadrons of squadrons!!

But I braved them to sneak a quick look at 1927 FV Louise Ockers!

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  More on the two unanswered Qs at the beginning soon.

Ironically, Road Fotos 17 were taken where this post ends up.  And I had planned NOT to post today, but . . .  time affords posting, and posting makes a drive more like a gallivant.  Given that I drove to Hampton Roads, it’s interesting to reflect on what scenes are absent from this post.  Three hours after locking my house door, I was on New Jersey at the southern tip on NJ, looking

across Delaware Bay, where I narrowly missed a close up

with a Kirbyfied . . .  can you guess? . . . .

Greenland Sea.   Lots of other vessels anchored just outside the channel, here looking roughly toward the northwest.

Entering Lewes, we met a dozen or so dolphins . . . who all managed to evade

my camera, which seems to be more skilled with stationary objects like this pilot boat.

I’m guessing a fish boat, although I’ve not seen this configuration before.   It reminds me of an updated version of a menhaden boat?

The Cape Charles light is a skeleton a quarter mile inland.

The lights at Fort Story in the background, and Trabzon and Red Iris anchored outside Hapmton Roads.

This might be USS Samuel Eliot Morison foreground and USCGC Legare farther away.  And then again, the nearer vessel might be something else.

And finally, any guesses what Atlantic Dawn is towing into the mouth the the Chesapeake?

Cutterhead dredge Illinois!!  If Illinois makes it all the way to the sixth boro, you know who will have more opportunities to perfect her rendition of the toothy snouted machine.

And the reason for this gallivant–other than gallivanting for its own sake– will be clearer tomorrow.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp today.

@#$#!! . . . as I write this, USAV Winfield Scott is passing the precise location Atlantic Dawn was 90 minutes ago.  To see USAV Winfield Scott, check Jed’s most recent post here.

In May 1962 John Kennedy had a party upon turning 45, and most people remember one person who attended.  But there were other entertainers who sang too like this native New Yorker (yes, he is.) and another singer, now largely unknown, whose name appears on that blue banner center below.   If you don’t remember the name, here’s (IMHO) her best song.  She also performed with this neighbor of mine from Queens, NY.   But this vessel?

She might be called Agulhas II, arriving yesterday in her homeport, having come from winter half a world away to the north just in time for winter way down south.  Here’s  her predecessor, once involved in an Oldendorff vessel (no, not this one) in the far far south.

Here she arrives after a month-long journey.   For the complete press release announcing her mission, click here.

Whether Miriam Makeba becomes her unofficial or official name, Agulhas (needles) refers to the true southernmost cape aka point of Africa.

Enseleni is one of the assist tugs. Click here to see her launched  . . .  in a manner I’ve never seen.  Click here to see a wide array of South African tugs.

Here’s a closeup of pilot boat Gannet (1977).

And the answer (correctly supplied in the comment by anonymous [Ann O'Nimes??])  to the figurehead question .  . . Europa it is!    And in a graphic demonstration of the interconnection of the sixth boro to almost everywhere watery, click here and here for fotos of Europa on a recent visit to the US “north coast.”  Has Europa ever been to New York?

Europa, 1911 launched!!  and beautifully preserved.  A reminder to, please, vote for Tug Pegasus and Waterfront Barge, today and every day until May 21.

All fotos here come compliments of Colin Syndercombe, who’s generously serving up the shipping news from the Cape Town waterfront.  Thanks much, Colin.

A final treat from Miriam Makeba . . .  Pata pata.  Fifty years ago she was a popular enough in the US to get major play on top-40 radio

If that wheel is working, then it can’t be anything in the sixth boro.  These fotos of the steamer Natchez come from Capt. Justin Zizes.

who took them here in the proximity of the Greater New Orleans Bridge.  Natchez the hull is a half century newer than her engine and machinery.

Tug in the foreground is Angus R. Cooper.  I’m not sure what the pusher tug with barge is.

Pauline M . . .  resembles at least a half dozen knees-prominent sixth boro tugs.

And a thousand miles to the northeast and fully accessible by water . . . a foto from Detroit,  thanks to Ken of MichiganExposures, showing  Wisconsin-built, New Jersey-powered Canadian-flagged bulk carrier Saginaw.  Meeting Saginaw is mailboat J. W. Westcott.

And finally, back in the sixth boro, some fotos from John Watson . . .  ATB Brownsville spinning with barge Petrochem Trader, East Coast, First Coast, Sarah Ann,  and Nahoku.

Navigator?  Sea Shuttle?   Anyhow, bound from Rhode Island to Virginia.

Again, thanks to Justin, Ken, and John for sending these along.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

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Seth Tane American Painting

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