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Besides larger tugboats like Urger, the Canal has a fleet of nearly identical smaller ones called dredge tenders, or usually just “tenders” like the unidentified one to the left in the photo below.

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Here’s a set:  Tender #1

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Tender 3 stern and

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bow and

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at work moving Urger out of dry dock.

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Tender #4 in February 2014, and

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tender #4 after being electrified, and

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at work in Utica this summer.

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Tender #6.

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Tender #7 summer and

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bow in winter, with an unidentified tender (registry at MB 5900??) and tender 4 in the distance.

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Tender #9 profile and

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three fourths.

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Tender #10 on the hard and

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assisting a dredge.

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Tender with identifier ending in 0209,

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. ..  0308

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. . . 0313 aka Dana?

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Dana again.

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Again, I need to dig into the history of this class of Canal vessel.  What number was this?

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and why is it here?  How many others are there?

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Ooops!  I skipped two from my archives . .  BB 152 and

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BB x … 0349

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Anyone know how many of these boats my archives lack?

 

This post is devoted to buoy boats (BB) only.  These vessels were “used to maintain and refuel kerosene lighted buoys on the state’s canal system. This series consists of plans, drawings, and specifications used in building the state’s buoy boat fleet at the Syracuse Canal Shops in the 1920s and 1930s,”  per NYS Division of Canals and Waters archives, Syracuse office.  Click here for an article from a 1982 issue of the Baldwinsville Messenger on a person who used BB 130 for “river sweeping.”

I’d love to learn how many of these vessels were built.  Meanwhile, here are the ones I have photos of.  Some are easily identified . . . like 153 and

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109.

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Others like 115 have numbers elsewhere.

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Others might have all numbers removed.

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Others have no BB number but do have a five-digit identifier beginning with “90 . . .”  here 90246.  Urger’s five-digit, e.g., is 90303.

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121,

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138,

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139

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142 . . .

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151,

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and finally, a summer shot of 153.

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Click here for three more, BB 110, 113, and 115.  I’ve also seen others that I don’t have photos of.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who hopes to talk to the archivists soon about these very 1920s looking workboats.

Anyone know how many total were built and deployed?  Anyone know of any that have been sold and converted into “BB yachtlettes”?

 

You can find my previous “golden” posts here.   From the first photo below until the seventh and last one, only twelve minutes pass.  The setting is lock 17 in Little Falls, NY, where the lift/descent is 40.5 feet.  .

Click here and here for some interesting historical pics.

Let’s start with 0703 hr on October 27 last.

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Six minutes later . . . the chamber has drained and the sun has emerged from the clouds.

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The door starts to raise as the counterweight descends . . . and against the south wall, it’s Urger .  . . behind a wall of drips . . .

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At 0715 . . . the captain has rung the forward bell and

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now squints, looking into the sun for navigational aids on the way east to Amsterdam, about six hours away.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has postponed dealing with more unfinished business until tomorrow.

 

Quick post . . . where and what TF is this?

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Part of the answer might be that this is an LCM-6.

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Of course, this makes some of the answers a little easier to decipher.  All three pics were taken within a mile of one another . . . and several hours apart.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will have answers soon.

 

The transformation from Erie Canal to Barge Canal involved incorporating more rivers and lakes into the canal system.   Enjoy these river and lake photos, like the one below . . . Oswego river, northbound, June 2014.  All photos were taken in 2014.

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Mohawk River eastbound also in June.

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Oneida Lake crossing eastbound, August.

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Mohawk River eastbound in August.

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Oneida Lake eastbound in late October.  Now contrast these photos with

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land cut near Waterford in October and

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near Rochester about a week earlier.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

In a previous post, I mentioned I was very subjectively dividing the canal into zones from west to east, and I continue that here, and this post is the most personal.  Place a compass needle in the place I did kindergarten through grade 12,  and make a circle around it with a radius of about 2o miles.  All these photos were taken inside that circle.  Although I did move away from there almost 50 years ago, I’m still surprised how little I recognize.  Of course, the water perspective here is one I never had as a kid.  Start here, I’ve driven on that road .  .  . Route 31 between Macedon and Palmyra a hundred plus times, but I did feel like an amnesiac seeing it this way.

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Leaving lock 29, there were a lot of folks, but I didn’t know them.

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This is the beginning of the “spillway” I needed to cross when I walked to first grade.  The bridge–much like the one in the distance–had an open grate deck, which terrified me the first few days.

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I was happy that a friend waved from the Galloway Bridge on the westward trip and another on the eastward trip.

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Route 31, travelled many times,  lies just a hundred feet of so off the right side of the photo.

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Port Gibson, population less than 500 in 2010.  New York state must have a few dozen towns, cities, hamlets, and/or villages with “port” in the name.

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I know this farm on a drumlin well in Newark, NY.  Although the population less than 10,000, Newark is what I considered a big town.

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Beyond those trees to the right is a principal street in Newark.

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This is the port of Newark.

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Just outside Lyons, NY, population under 4000 and shrinking, awaits Grouper, subject of many posts including this recent one.

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Inside the village of Lyons . . . a mural on a wall that borders the location of the previous iterations of the canal depicts what might once have been here.

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Outside of town, these “wide ditches” are the actual “enlarged canal” of the 19th century.

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And ruins like these . . . I never knew existed even though I knew the place name “Lock Berlin.”

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Why did I never know the railroad through my world then crossed in places like this  . . .?

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I’d seen these grain bins from the road but never imagined the canal lay right behind–or “in front of” –them

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Quoth the eagle . . . you can’t go home again if you never really knew your home to begin with.

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Al photos by Will Van Dorp.  Many thanks to Bob Stopper who showed me what I should have seen a half century ago.

 

I’m moving eastward from yesterday’s post with my very subjective dividing of the NYS Canal system into zones.  Very subjective, we then move into New York State’s third largest city–Rochester, which also happens to be what I learned about as “the city” as a boy.  If someone worked “in the city,” that meant Rochester.  In the photo below, technically in Greece, you can see the junction lock, the gates leading to a lock on the original and possibly the enlarged canal.  Those iterations of the Erie Canal went straight here, the Barge Canal (the early 20th century iteration) forked off to the right, bypassing the city of Rochester.

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I hadn’t considered what “bypassing Rochester” would look like, and my zones 1 and 2 were portions of the canal I’d never seen from the water.  What it looks like is lots of bridges, with signs to places I knew but otherwise no traces, no familiar skyline.

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Approach lighting system for the airport I took my first flight from,

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but otherwise bridges, some beautiful . . .

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some footbridges . . .

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and others very serviceable vehicle and waterway structure . . .

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with some people in view

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as well as some current commercial buildings

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and bridges some complete . . .

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and trafficked

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Certainly there are vestiges of industrial marine usage

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not used in decades.

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The creation of a kayak park and boat house is one of many transformations that make recreation the current Erie Canal’s industry.

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Another transformation . . . silos into new uses.  The tour boat in the foreground is Sam Patch, named for Sam Patch, of course.

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I have a personal connection with the Pittsford canal front:  as a boy, I harvested pickles  for a neighbor, and one Saturday night I got to ride the farm truck to the piccalilli plant, right near the Schoen complex.   If only time travel were possible and I could take that truck ride to the pickle factory again . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I’m back along the sixth boro but sorting through all my photos puts my head back up along the canal corridor, and I decided to divide the waterway into zones, subjective ones suggested by memory and photos.  Also, whim tells me to do them in the order that comes easiest.  So I’ll start with the longest level .  . . about 50 miles between Greece and Spencerport all the way to Gasport. . . WITHOUT a single lock!

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Allow a snarky comment first on the bridges . . . more than a dozen of them in this stretch.  Some signage calls them draw bridges and others  . . . lift bridges.  For the record, I’d call some lift bridges.  . .

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and these  . . . a fixed bridges.

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The tow path is a heavily trafficked bike path.  Click here for some disused lingo once apparently spoken in these parts.

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There are lots of birds, but this is unique.

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If you think this a chicken farm, look again  more closely.

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The road along the north side of the canal here is lower than the level of water, as are the cabbage field and apple orchard.

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Between Albion and Medina there’s the quite unique and quite old Culvert Road.

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Early fall  . . . and the trees are heavy,

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the grain combined and stored in bins.

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In Medina, one of my favorite places in this portion of the canal, this dam allows the canal to be navigable

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some 70 feet above Oak Orchard Creek.

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Historical signs point out a non-scandal involving a former politician and

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connection between this mostly farming area and  . . . say  ..  . Brooklyn Bridge.

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OK . . . Gasport.  Next stop Lockport.

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All photos taken in October by Will Van Dorp.  If you have photos to share from when this portion of the canal saw commercial traffic, please get in touch.  As it was last month, vessels drawing eight feet or more sometimes struggle with the bottom.

DB here expands to “derrick boat, not a term that had been in my vocabulary before this season.  Why DB #4 has been dubbed “the chief” I don’t know.

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The next two photos show DB #4 eastbound near Schenectady a few days ago, pushed by Grand Erie and

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boom resting on a scow.

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Here’s the same derrick boat working on reinforcing a canal wall east of Herkimer back in August.  The white tour vessel is Lil Diamond III operated by Erie Canal Cruises Herkimer.

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In late September, here was DB 2A working near Newark.  Note the elbow boom.   Tug Syracuse is standing by with the scows.

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Here’s another shot of those units.  I’m not sure how the nomenclature makes this DB 2A.

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Here’s DB 13 at the Genesee Crossing, i. e., the point where the Erie Canal and the Genesee make an X.  Standing by here is Tender #9.   I’m planning an encyclopedia of canal tenders soon.

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I don’t know how many other functioning derrick boats work the Canal.  One non-functioning one is here in Oswego.

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Here’s what the sign out front says.  I’m wondering if the other derrick boats above date from the same era.

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Two shore mounted derricks are this one in Fonda and

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this one at the junction lock in New London NY . .  between Rome and Syracuse.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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