You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘photograpy contest’ category.

For info on the Patty Nolan bikini contest, click the small foto below.

V-Day, Chinese New Year, and Mardi Gras @!@#@!! . . . within hours of each other …  makes this a special set of days.  Here’s my 2010 Mardi Gras post, quite different from 2009’s.   The vessel below is Patty Nolan, high and dry in Verplanck, New York.  I featured fotos of Patty at least twice before, notably here and here, the second one initially being a mystery tug foto taken by Jed.

Patty Nolan is the second tug owned by Capts Dave Williams and John Johnsen.  The first–Lewis F Boyer aka Tug Travis–floated from 1920 until 2001, when it was “reefed” off New Jersey.  Fotos of the sinking can be seen here.

Some history and specs:  built by Merritt-Chapman and Whitney in Superior, WI (a suburb of Duluth, MN) in 1931, Patty’s vitals are 41′ x 13′ x 6.’

Note the keel cooler.

Sweet lines await de-barnacling and re-painting by early March.

Power is provided by a 300-hp Cummins, circa 1954.

Controls on this 79-year-old hull have been upgraded, like this “joystick”  aka NFU and

remote control.

You might be wondering how this could be a “mardi-gras” post, for any reason other than I’ve returned from a multi-stop gallivant today, “monday before mardi gras.”  Here’s the tie:  note the “figurehead” more accurately “figure-figure”, yellow bikini-clad in the fotos below.

Once this bikini was neon-yellowishgreen.

Sunny months of braving the elements as well as shivering months of languishing in the cold wheelhouse bombarded by UV light have faded the color of the Hudson River’s only tugboat figurehead.

To put it plainly, upon consultation with Captains Dave and John as well as Dr. Elizabeth, we have concluded that Patty Nolan needs a new bikini. And I’m humbly asking for your help, sort of like the fund-raisers on NPR, PBS, and various & sundy political organizations. Here’s how you can help:

1. Send me, tugster, a foto of a bikini. It can be new or old, solid color or print (polka dot, tile, school or business logo), skimpy or ample, cloth or some other material, even contemporary or traditional.

2. I prefer that the foto sent in be on a model, any model. Given that Patty Nolan’s “figure-figure” lacks . . . a head, arms, and lower-half-legs, what COULD be depicted of the model could mimic Patty’s figurefigure. I realize I could be inviting all manner of tugster “hate mail” here, but we are an equal opportunity, gender-equality- and whole-person- promoting blog.

3. Fotos will be judged by tugster and Capts Dave and John. The winner will be announced on March 20, which just happens to be the spring equinox.

4. Prize: fame–”coin of the realm” in the blogging world–and signing rights on the bikini. Also, lunch with luminaries at the Peekskill Brewery.

All fotos here by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s a Mardi Gras film I’d like to see . . .

Best Mardi Gras on a waterblog . . .  that’s Horse’s Mouth!!

If you’re a new reader, I use “sixth boro” as a way to recognize the city space that IMHO deserves recognition as its own unitary name;  without the water, justification for the concentrations in the other five boroughs of New York City would disappear.  Hence, all the city water and  . . . extensions thereof in all navigable directions I call the sixth boro.  Want to go to Fiji or  Philly or Fundy . . . follow the sixth boro.  I need someone to write a wikipedia entry for the sixth boro.

More Flinterduin offloading fotos here;  I’ve got many more if you’re interested.  Let’s follow Sydsulver, a steel Lemsteraak built in 2004.  Lemster is a location name, so this is an aak from Lemster, like a Brooklynaak.  For the record, most of the barges are either aaks or tjalks (pronounced “chaw lick”) .  Tjalks were originally used for cargo on inland waterways, and aaks  . . . for fishing on the Zuiderzee, now called the  IJsselmeer.  Double click on fotos to enlarge them.

aasb1

Note the helmets all around.

aasb2

I would not have predicted the number of traditional Dutch design “airships” appearing in this blog this year.  Captions follow.

aasb3

How to lead a barge to water.

aasb4

How to inculcate an interest in sailing among the next generation.

aasb5

How smooth and polished to get a painted surface.  And how to maneuver in tight basins.

aasb55

Splash.  That’s  Groenevecht lying to the right.

aasb6

Carving detail and

aasb7

closer up.

aasb8

The most beautiful tiller ornament in the sixth boro and far beyond.

aasb9

Held in the basin.  Brown sail is HZ108 Janus Kok, a wooden botter from 1934!  Botters are traditional fishing vessels also.  Design on the sail is the sponsor’s logo, “old amsterdam cheese.”  To the right along the wall is Windroos, a hoogaars built in 1925.  Now if you know that “hoog” means high . . . as in “up high,” then you can figure out the “ars.”  “Hoogars” vessels have a more upswept stern than aaks, botters, or tjalks.  More Windroos to come.

aasb10

Painted ships in a painted basin.

aasb11

Flinterduin shifted forward so that the offloaded barges could leave to make space for the rest.  Sydsulver leaves first.  Notice the decoration around the hawse.

aasb12

Escape into the boro.  You can’t keep the Dutch pinned up long.  Everydayeastriver foto’d one of the explorers/escapees.

aasb13

and posing.  That’s the Williamsburg Bridge and –of course–Empire State Building in the background.  By the way, on the bowsprit flies the Friesland provincial flag.

aasb14

Again, many thanks to the fine folks at GMD and to Carter Craft for access.  The barges will cavort in the sixth boro and surroundings waters for the next month.  Some foto ops may happen at North Cove soon, home of Atlantic Yachting, new on my blogroll.

Another newcomer  on my blogroll is NY400.blogspot.com, an account of the barges’ month here by Arjen Wapenaar, captain of the Sterre, a tjalk built in 1887!!!  English site about Sterre here.  Amazingly, Sterre has been in New York harbor before:  some 20 plus years ago for the Statue of Liberty celebrations.  Scroll through that English-language link and you’ll see Sterre in the harbor with the Twin Towers in the background.  Does anyone have pictures to share of that event?  I hope Arjen posts lots of fotos so that non-Dutch readers can enjoy his sailing barge tales.

More Flinterduin AND the tug races this weekend.  Haven’t they cancelled the US Open because the sixth boro activities draw greater crowds?

All fotos here by Will Van Dorp.

With many thanks to everydayeastriver.tumblr.com . . .  welcome Flinterduin!  In the next few hours, her cargo will be offloaded, and the sixth boro will see sail and leeboards as it never has before.  Amusing though confusing was the counterclockwise victory lap of Governors Island Flinterduin indulged before heading under the southernmost East River bridges on her way to GMD.

aafd1

More later, but here’s another look at her deckload.

aafd2

Might there be an as-yet unannounced tugboat race entry down in the hold?  And the contest . . . not over yet.

When tugs race on Sunday, government boats will officiate.  Here are a few players.

When Liberty IV splashed into her element in 1989 at the Washburn & Doughty yard in East Boothbay, ME, she began a career that she still occupies:  to ferry Park Service employees and supplies from the “mainland” to several stops in the sixth boro archipelago, i.e.,  Liberty Island and Ellis Island.  Besides bearing a heritage relationship with such diverse vessels as Pati T. Moran, Shearwater, and Black Knight, she also carries a unique escutcheon on her stern.

aaagb1Does anyone have fotos of Liberty I or II or III?  Would Liberty I be sail or steam?

aaagb2

John D. McKean, foto taken one sunset a few weeks back, started service in 1954, first splashing into the waters in Camden at John H. Mathis, the same yard that built Mary Whalen!

aaaagb

A Perth Amboy Fire boat zipped eastward in the KVK last month.  That’s K-Sea Baltic Sea in the background.

aaaagb9

USACE Moritz, in  hurry toward Newark Bay last week. Moritz comes from Kvichak Industries, soon

aagmx

disappeared round the bend at Bergen Point.

aagmx2

Other recent fotos of government boats include this ones entrusted to  Union County (New Jersey)  Police,

aagmx3and New Jersey State Police.

aagmx4

Finally, certainly NOT a government boat, but a German ship that has vessels that experiment with alternative propulsion.  Foto was taken by bowsprite from her cliff last week.  Did anyone catch the name?

aagmx5

Finally, as of Wednesday morning writing, Flinterduin will approach the Narrows near dusk tonight and start offloading tomorrow at dawn.  And I have to be at work . . . from dusk today until dawn Friday . . .  maybe I can sneak away to do tugster’s bidding.

All fotos here by Will Van Dorp.

Besides a tug race this weekend, there’s also a unique vessel (like Day Peckinpaugh) display.  See details here.  Also, here’s a revised schedule for Flinterduin.

My focus in this series is tugboats I don’t recall seeing in the race since I first “discovered” the event just a few years back.  And which tug is making this splash?  Any guesses?

aaat1It’s John P. Brown, which seems the wrong name given the dominant color.  I’ve never seen this green one in the race.

aaat2

Evening Mist (ex-Patricia A. Bouchard). Currently a Bouchard boat?  Have they participated?

aart

What about Cheyenne (now registered in Newark?)  1965.  Raced?

aatr1

And Charles D. McAllister (ex-Exxon Bayou State 1967)?  I’m thinking to do a post on stacks, and the Exxon boats have unique ones.

aatr2

Don Jon boats in general I don’t recall. This is Meagan Ann (ex-Scorpius, Joseph T, Olympic, and Georgeann, 1975).

aaat3

In the creative color category, Hubert Bays (2002) would surely win.  Did it have orange trim a few years back?

aaat4

Huntress (1955) might win the “less seen in the north and east end of the sixth boro” category.

aaat5

And Captain D (ex-Dick Bollinger 1974), an outatowner based in Norfolk.

aaat6

Neither do I recall this green fleet in the race.  Is this  Falcon the 1970-built tug?  Falcon has the sweetest work in the boro, moving sugar for the plant in Yonkers.

aaat7I said all this with the disclaimer–repeated–that I haven’t been following this race many years.  So please correct me if pre-2005 some of my observations are just plain wrong.

Also, Flinterduin is still at sea, seeming to be moving slower than they themselves expected.  I hope all is well.  Now it’s starting to look like a September 2 ETA.  Keep your cameras at the ready.

All fotos here by Will Van Dorp.

Click here to see posts for the week before the race in 2008.

Below, and occupying the notch, Lincoln Sea, participant with all 8000 horses in the 2006 race here.  I don’t know if Lincoln Sea (ex-S/R Everett from 2000)will be free to compete next week.

aatr1

I don’t recall either Joan Moran (1975) or Gramma Lee T taking part in years I’ve watched.  They showed fantastic torque yesterday spinning Andre Jacob on her axis.  Interestingly, see the last foto here a year ago with Andre Jacob then bearing the name Margara!!   Some vessels disappear to Alang;  others disappear but reappear hiding in plain sight with new names.

aatr2

I also don’t recall Hornbeck boats like Liberty Service (ex-Mac Tide 63 and Jaramac 63 from 1983) taking part.

aatr3

Or Witte boats like Thomas D. (from 1961 and formerly holding such names as Kendall P. Brake, Reliance, Tammy, Matty J, and  June C) , fotoed here at the Salt Fest yesterday.

aatr4

Ellen McAllister (1966) may have.

aatr5

I don’t recall Dann Ocean Towing boats, like Shannon (ex-Alice H and Chelsea from 1971) here,  competing.  That’s Captain Log off starboard and Houma off port.

aatr6

Greenland Sea (ex-Emma M Roehrig, S/R Providence, Tecumseh, and Doc Candies from 1990) I don’t recall.

aatr7

Or Great Lakes Dock and Dredge boats, like McCormack Boys (1982) here.

aatr8

I have friends who, when “talking” baseball or football can pull the most arcane details and statistics out of the air, as if they’d spend hours memorizing the stuff.  I hope someone following the sixth boro tug races has a  better grasp of statistics than me.

Bowsprite fotoed the vessel below a few days back from her cliff.  I’m intrigued.  Can anyone identify this yacht?  It’s Atlantide!!

aatrmyst

Remember,  Working Harbor Committee annual Tug Boat Race & Competition will be held on Sunday, 6 September from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Pier 84 on the Hudson River.  Here’s a note from them: “In addition to selling tickets on our spectator boat (a Circle Line 42 vessel) we are offering 12 tickets for sale to be in the race on a tug TBD.  The price of a ticket is $250 per person.  The number of passengers is limited to 12.  Please email Meg Black —   meg@workingharbor.org — to purchase tickets.”

All fotos except the last one by Will Van Dorp, who waits with bated breath for Flinterduin.    Get your cameras ready; she arrives in the next 24 hours.

Quick post on the 1st annual Atlantic Salt Maritime Fest.  Atlantic Salt brings salt from Ireland, Chile, and Mexico through the sixth boro to keep icy roads less treacherous.  Where salt made a huge mound in this winter post, today there was frivolity, free food, and lots of smiles.  Thank you, Atlantic Salt.  Below Half Moon and container vessel Sumida meet.

aasf0

Kristy Ann Reinauer and Thomas Witte paraded past, and

aasf2

as did  Rana Miller.  More Rana later; she’s quite similar to Guardian, posted here last winter.

aasf1

There was singing, drumming, and dancing.

aasf1

Did it rain??

aasf7

No, problem.  Did tugster find friends?  Oh, this is getting frivolous.

aasf8

Bowsprite took the foto above; all others by Will Van Dorp.  By the way, if you know the Where’s Waldo series, bowsprite is depicted in TWO of the fotos above.  Where’s bowsprite?

By the way, as of this writing, Flinterduin, the 15-masted motor vessel,  approaches 50 degrees west, due south of Newfoundland.  She should enter the harbor before Monday morning; I will do the math later to narrow the ETA.  Remember the foto contest.

An adjective I’ve not heard of late and would like to resurrect is “many-splendored.”  That word captures my sense of the KVK, aka Kill van Kull.   If you live anywhere near the sixth boro, you can get up close by coming to the maritime fest at the Atlantic Salt yard.  I’ve not found much info about  them, but this is a space where salt is stockpiled for safe driving on icy roads, not savory eating in spite of your doctor’s wishes.  One post I wrote about this place is here.  Anyone share a link for more Atlantic Salt?  For example, I know salt comes from multiple places;  anyone help with provenance info?  On the building poster, the red-white-blue mound behind the orange ferry is a tarp-covered salt pile.

aasf

I caught this prep work happening at Atlantic Salt yesterday.   The Weeks barge carries the universe of waterpod.

aasf1

Atlantic Salt lies near the east end of KVK;  Norwegian Sea here enters the west end. That’s Shooter’s Island behind Norwegian, and behind that, reaching even higher than the upper wheelhouse, those are the gantries at Howland Hook.

aasf2

In almost the same location, sometimes referred to as Bergen Point, Oleander shows how a container ship lists in a turn; I imagine “slaloming” past a marker at the inside of a channel turn.

aasf3

John B. Caddell is a regular on the KVK, as

aasf4

are assist tugs Ellen McAllister and

aasf5Gramma Lee T. Moran.

aasf6

All fotos taken this week by Will Van Dorp.  This September is a many-splendored month;  two big, nearly-climactic,  halfmoonthly installments –we hope the channeling efforts work–coming up for HenrysObsession, the creative non-fiction and art project by Bowsprite and Tugster.

Some announcements:

This Sunday into Monday . . . Flinterduin will enter the sixth boro.  I reiterate the foto contest of this many-masted motor vessel entering the harbor delivering the many-splendored sailing barges.

September 6:  the 17th annual running of the sixth boro’s tugboat race.

September 12thish:  Waterford Tug Roundup.  Note that voting for “people’s choice” tug is long underway.  Anyone can vote ONCE.  I already did.

So that I avoid being labelled too much of a tease, I’ll start by saying . . . this post features two ships and a tale, but I do NOT know the tale of the two ships,  which in themselves are related only in that they both traversed the KVK yesterday morning in opposite directions.  The tale comes at the end, but before we get there, imagine loading a large population of boro6’s historic vessels onto a ship for a festival on another continent. for example, suppose the groups and people responsible for Pioneer, Lettie G. Howard, Pegasus, Shearwater, and Adirondack agree for their treasures to be –literally–shipped to South America for a festival.  Visualize the emotional cargo making its way to the south.  (Btw, if you don’t know these vessels, type the names into the search window on the left side of this blog.) And I’ll get back to this.

Now let’s learn some taxonomy (tjalk, aak, jol, botter, hoogaars, skutsje) and some place names (Lemster, Giethoorne, Zeeuwland).   Ponder those words;  I’ll get back to them too.

Here are two more shots of Sea Miror, also depicted in yesterday’s post.

aasm1

Judging by the stains on the hull, I’m guessing this bulk carrier, its previous life betrayed by the paint job on the stack, transports a building material like cement.  Anyone help with this?

aasm2

Moving toward my point, I gave a big KVK welcome yesterday to MV Marneborg, a general cargo ship registered in

aasm3

Delfzijl, up near the North Sea border between Netherlands and Germany.  This area serves as setting for one of my favorite sailing books:  Riddle of the Sands (1903),  by Erskine Childers, author, sailor, and Irish nationalist executed by the British in 1922.  I love the sailing and intrigue in the book.

aasm4

Marneborg has the profile of contemporary northern European general cargo carriers;  actually, she looks not unlike Flinterduin, featured here a few days ago.  I’ve duly noted that the extraordinary orange survey vessel betrays a desire to follow Marneborg here. That’s Brooklyn in the hazy background.

aasm5

So, when Flinterduin arrives in less than a week, it will treat sixth boro watchers with some quite unique and historic Dutch sailing vessels.  Some examples:

Sterre (translated “Stars”)  a tjalk built in 1887!

Vrouwe (Lady) Cornelia, a tjalk built in 1888.

De Goede Hoop (Good Hope) , a staverse jol.

Delfzijl, a modern port.  Lemster, once a traditional Zuyder Zee fishing village.  Giethoorne, another tiny water village.  Zeeuwland, a province along the southwest coast of the Netherlands.  The list could be very long, but the point is that coastal Netherlands, like coastal US, has places each associated with various boat types.  For example, Jonesport lobster boats, Cape Ann schooners and dories, Chesapeake skipjacks . . . .

More tales on this later, as my excitement for September builds.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp and imaginary gnomes.

Remember the foto contest:  material prize for the best foto of Flinterduin entering New York or making its way up to the Brooklyn Navy Yard on or about August 31,  As of dawn August 27, tracking shows Flinterduin NW of the Azores, about halfway across.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 372 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments? Email Tugster

My job . . . Summer 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

Archives

free web page hit counter
September 2014
M T W T F S S
« Aug    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930  
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 372 other followers