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. . . with some digressions . . .  .  The photo below of the procession leading to the Roundup comes from Jeff Anzevino.

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Digress to the left . . . on the Troy (Lansingburgh) side through the trees is Melville Park and this sign and

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this house.  If you’re looking for a good read about Melville’s later life on the waters off Lower Manhattan, check out this Frederick Busch historical novel.

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Here’s another shot by Jeff, taken from the 112th Street Bridge.  You might recognize the crewman standing beside the wheelhouse port side.  There are many other posts with photos from Jeff, such as this one.

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From Bob Stopper, exiting lock 27, it’s Roosevelt-late 1920s built-and Syracuse-early 1930s built.   Click here for some photos Bob –and others–sent along earlier this year.

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From Jason LaDue . .  a photo of tender (?) Oneida taken in 2001.   Anyone know the disposition of Oneida?  Click here for some previous photos from Jason.

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And finally, from Fred tug44 . . .  locking through E2  . . . right behind us.  I feel grateful to have an occasional view of self to post here.   Some of you have seen some of these on Facebook.

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Thanks to Jeff, Jason, Bob, and Fred for photos here.

 

(I haven’t used this title since 2008) Ooops!  not true.  Here were 2 and 3.

Notwithstanding all that . ..    sometimes the thought that a day is the first day in the rest of one’s life is superlatively vivid.    Enjoy my pics and maybe you’ll get this sense also.

Sunday afternoon, Zhen Hua 10 enters the Kills. Does anyone know if “Zhen Hua” means anything?  Note Manhattan and the tip of Bayonne to the left, and tug Brooklyn, Robbins Reef Light, and the boro of Brooklyn to the right.

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The new cranes arriving and the bridge their squeezing underneath are integrally related parts of the same story, as . . .

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… are the cranes and the dredging equipment in the background.  Note tug Specialist in the background

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Margaret Moran tends the port bow.

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Gramma Lee T Moran supplies the brakes and rudder.

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The ship completes its journey of thousands of miles.  Is it true that Zhen Hua 10 arrived here via Cape of Good Hope?

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On the same theme . .  here’s a handsome team of tugs, good paint all around.  Working on a tandem assignment?

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My thought when I read the name on the nearer tug was . . . this is historic . . . Crow‘s last ride;  the Bushey tug might also be in the last mile of its thousands and thousands in a half century of work.

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She’s being escorted in by Emily Ann . . .

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Crow and her sister Cheyenne DO have classic lines!

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Machines on shore were already staged . . . .

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while not far away a last spring seal lollygags on some warm rusty metal, once also a brand new machine.

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And on the other side of Staten Island rubble of a light indispensable a century ago adapts to a new life as a rookery.

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Many thanks to NYMedia Boat.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will be transiting himself soon.  Thursday I leave on a grand gallivant, and in early June–if all goes well– I start a new chapter working on Urger, that handsome young centenarian tug you see upper left at the top of the page.

Bravo on the almost immediate and many correct identifications of the hulk in yesterday’s post.

Here’s an undated photo of SS Normandie in the sixth bork passing an unidentified Dalzell (?) tug.

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Photo from John Skelson . . . PT boat eastbound on the KVK.  Notice the onramp to the Bayonne Bridge in this and the next few photos.  Here’s a “hidden NJ” blogpost about Bayonne’s ELCO shipyard.  Here’s a list of vessels built there.

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From the same location, another of John’s photos . . .  destroyer, Great Lakes dredge, spectators,

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and Moran tugs.  Anyone add some info on the destroyer?

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Recognize the bridge?  This photo–from the New York City Archives, as are all the the rest here– is identified as taken in January 1937.  Whaling City then was a fishing vessel.  A vessel by that name operates today as a fast ferry.

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Notice 120 Wall Street.  This photo was taken January 1937 and shows F/V Charles B. Ashley.

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Not much info on this next set . . . . a dredge from a century ago and

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a survey vessel.

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And finally . . . this may be the last of my black/white photos . . . the sign tells all about the attitude of the value of salt marshes a half century ago and before . . .

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Thanks much to John Skelson for sharing his “family archives” photos, and if the fog over the sixth bork today has you staying indoors, go check out the New York City Municipal Archives online gallery.

 

First the specifics . . . 70 Henry Street Brooklyn Heights Cinema tonight at 7 for reception with showing starting at 8.    After the show, stop by at Park Plaza Bar about .1 mile nearby.

So it’s appropriate to lead these NYC Municipal Archives photos off with tugboat Brooklyn.

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Next  in an icy North River  (?) . . . . . . Richmond.

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Launches  Bronx and

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Queens.

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Passenger steamer Little Silver, which ran between the Battery and Long Branch, NJ in the first decade of the 20th century.

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And finally . . . John Scully, a very classy Dialogue (Use the “find” feature to search) built built tug

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And the connection . . . here’s what boats of this vintage look like today in “disintegration experiments” in waters everywhere.  I took these in August 2011 while Gary and I filmed Graves of Arthur Kill.

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Some boats of this time, of course, still operate like Pegasus (1907) and Urger (1901)

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while others try to stave off time so that they might once again like New York Central No. 13 (1887).

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I’ve long subscribed to the notion that getting there should be as thrilling as arriving, so  . . .  let’s continue the ride backward past this 1914 post  . . . to  . . . 1910.

Below . . . it’s the Statue cruise of the day loading where it does today.  Notice a roofed Castle Clinton–formerly fort, immigration center, music hall– in the background left.

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NYC tug Manhattan . . . built 1874!  Now where do her bones lie?

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Steamer Brighton assisted by New York Tugboat Company’s Geo. K. Kirkham.

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Front and center here is Celt  (scroll through) , the yacht with many reinventions that now languishes in a creek west of Cincinnati, waiting for me . . .   There’s lots of intriguing traffic in the background.

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Thomas Willett built in 1908 by Alex Miller of Jersey City for a fortune in the amount of $335,000.

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And finally . . . a 1911 photo of a a vessel captioned as SS Momu . . . .  Tug and pier are also unidentified.  The logo on the stack should help someone.

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That’s it for today.   I hope group sourcing can teach us more about these photos.

More from the archives . . .  aerial of Pier 40 and the Holland Tunnel vent . . . photo said to be taken in 1955.

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Photo said to be “three-masted schooner” in 1937.  Clearly that’s not a schooner there with the GW Bridge in the background.  Anyone know what sailing ship that might have been?

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Photo by Sam Brody February 1938.  Ferry Hackensack foreground with Jack Frost Sugars over on the Edgewater, NJ side.

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Todd Shipyard, 1935-41 . .  .  Here’s a list of what was built there and an aerial view (you may have to scroll horizontally) of what it today is occupied by IKEA.

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SS Normandie . . . headed for the North River piers.

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City of Chattanooga December 1937.

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Brooklyn docks as seen from Brooklyn Heights, November 1937.  Here’s a Munson Lines flyer.

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Here’s the schedule–sorry for all the repetition–for Wednesday evening’s documentary portion of the Art of Brooklyn Film Festival, where Graves of Arthur Kill will be shown.  Gary and I will hang for a while at Park Plaza Bar after the show. It may be mobbed?

I didn’t want to call this post “something different 19″ because clearly it wouldn’t be different from the previous days.  A pattern has emerged, and then I realized that part of the pattern is that these photos depict some of the unidentifiable vessels lost in boneyard or ship graveyards like the one focused upon in the documentary Graves of Arthur Kill.   Here they are, in their prime or at least working although forgotten.

All the photos in this post were taken during the Great Depression, by photographers who were funded through the WPA, Works Progress Administration.  I am grateful this documentation happened.  And my caption are based on the captioning–specific or general–accompanying the photos in the archives.

Below . . . US Gypsum tug.   notice the Bayonne Bridge on the horizon near the left edge of the shot.

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Photographer Ralph de Sola took this shot of tug Sarah and much smaller one without a name I can find.

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Caption says SS Brennen May 1937.  But I believe the vessel passing Pier A is actually SS Bremen.  Assorted small boats here I can’t identify.

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I’m intrigued here by the “car float” marked “Brooklyn Jay Street Terminal . . .”  shifting rail cars from right to left.  Is that a McAllister tug on the far side?  And is that how the Staten Island ferry terminal looked in the late 1930s and what is the building on the water left side of photo where the Coast Guard Building is now located?

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Here’s an intriguing E. M. Bofinger photo dated June 1938, taken from  . . . foot of Wall Street?  If Bennett Air Service is at all related to Floyd Bennett and the now unused Floyd Bennett Field, it’s noteworthy that Floyd Bennett himself had died–age 37– in April 1938.  Click here for many more Bofinger photos.

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Another photographer of water scenes in the archives is James Suydam.  Here are piers 13 through 15, the area currently just south of South Street Seaport.  Prominent against the sky then was 70 Pine, just to the left of stepped back 120 Wall.  The other two are 40 Wall (with antenna) and 20 Exchange, south of 120 Wall.

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Here’s a photo attributed to Treistman, said to be taken from the top of Seamen’s Institute and looking over the same piers as shown in the previous photo.

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Moving back over to the other side of Manhattan, it’s SS Conte di Savoia at the pier with an unidentified steam tug to the left.  For a photo of the liner with more color, click here.

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Again, the context here . . .  Wednesday night, come see the Graves of Arthur Kill, our documentary screened at the Art of Brooklyn Film Festival on tugboats and other vessels of this era and older and what became of them.

And if you’re free the night before, check out this program on salvage sponsored by Working Harbor Committee.

 

I took six of these fotos with my camera and four with another, given to me, that costs three times as much as mine.  Can you distinguish which is which?  I realize I might NOT YET be able to get top performance from the second camera.  Or maybe in this format it’s impossible to distinguish one from the other . ..  because they’re like oil and oil.  Or like these two tankers, contorted together like slugs in love.  Ever seen slugs in  . . . love?

Mahanadi Spirit gets assisted from her berth by

Charles D. McAllister, spun counterclockwise and

sent out

to sea with additional assist by Maurania III.

Next to move was Chemical Pioneer, with the same

assist team.

A bit later, sibling tankers came in to the dock.  Noble Express came in followed by

Silver Express.

Docking looked like this, one vessel almost merged with the other.

And can you tell which fotos were taken with camera A and camera B?

Answer is down a bit.

Slugs in love . . . I first saw it waiting at the commuter rail station a few weeks back at 6:15 am, thinking I should have had more coffee . . . .

Please . . . some feedback.  Be blunt and frank about the quality of fotos on this blog.  Pass the link onto any professional photographers even.  I’m re-examining my aesthetic.  And after seeing slugs in love, I can handle anything, even dragonfly love.

Answer:  The first three were with my usual camera, then three with camera B, then two one with mine, then one more with camera B, and the last two were with mine.    The two cameras in question were mine (SP 590-UZ Olympus) whose weight and zoom capability I love and a Sony Cyber-shot DSC R1.

If you have a chance to get to Pier 25 in Lower Manhattan, you should see Carolina Salguero‘s Maritime 9/11 exhibit on steamer Lilac.  Click here for info.

Also, check out this very moving 12-minute video called Boatlift, an effort to evacuate Lower Manhattan 10 years ago using the fastest, safest route out.  In the past week, New York harbor aka the sixth boro has seen a large vessel as

well as these small ones, RIBs.   They seem to be everywhere, but

maybe it’s just a few flying hither and yon

actively intercepting

anyone in the wrong place.  That’s QM2 leaving town after being escorted across the Upper Bay last week.

Try intruding on a safety zone and

these folks will intercept you in the most

convincing and

intimidating fashion.

No matter the time and weather . . . and

the sixth boro’s seen enough weather of late to take on Mississippi mud colors…

these patrol vessels zoom around.

along with RBMs (in the distance) and vessels

of other agencies like NYPD.

I’m not posting tomorrow.  I’m going off to a meditative place.  The closing foto today comes thanks to Capt. Justin Zizes.  Thanks, Justin.

A parting thought . .  I think it’s possible that folks who have never lived in NYC might have a hard time understanding New Yorkers.  I’m just a transplant here, but I understand the sentiments described in this NYTimes article by N. R. Kleinfield.

All fotos except the last one by Will Van Dorp.

Coney Island–the reef–has existed within the sixth boro since time immemorial, this gathering has occurred since 1983, and tugster has blogged it since 2007, drawn by the natural beauty of creatures–like this one– with

their altruistic sensibilities, their

bio-diversity, their

breathing behavior in dry–if muggy- air, and … more.

But I couldn’t help noticing yesterday that  . . . as the mermaids school on this reef, so does another species . . . camera-bearers.  Even chief-liaison Dick Zigun has cameras turned on him.

And mermaids themselves sport cameras, maybe as mimicry.

But yesterday the camera-bearers were everywhere!

They schooled–dare I say swarmed–each time a seamaid emerged out of the reef.

Not that the mercreatures seemed to perceive threat;  in fact,

 it looked like mutual enjoyment

a case of fun, fanfare,

flourish, and frippery.

And camera-bearers feasted at every turn.

And how do you suppose I got these fotos of

such lovely creatures, who

traveled by a range of

conveyance?

More on that tomorrow . . . and the pasties and paint verson of the story.

OK, all fotos here by Will Van Dorp.

Totally related:  in the third foto from end above . . . one mermaid sported a tugboat atop her hear but my shot was blurry.  Also, I missed a shot of the “librarian mermaids,”  which, if anyone got, I’d love a link or a copy.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

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