You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Philadelphia’ category.

Thanks for all the guesses, both in comments and on email.  Last week I accompanied a group of journalists invited on board.  The word from the SS United States Conservancy is that the need for action is urgent;  the project is running a critical “race against time.”  Here are a few key facts about the vessel from the conservancy website.  This is the first of several posts I intend to do.  Click here for an Op-Ed piece written by one of the guides on our tour Susan Gibbs, grand daughter of the the vessel’s designer, architect, and creator.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Note the unique “sampan wing” tips on the funnels.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This is midships looking aft in the First Class corridor, as it looks today.   To the left, you can see the deck “footprints” of suites, including where the plumbing rested.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This section of the “First Class stairs,” like the entire interior is stripped to bare metal.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Use your imagination . . . this is the First class ballroom, where Count Basie and other greats played.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This is the port side promenade deck.  (Follow the links there.)  Too enclosed, you think?  You’d want it enclosed for a passage in the North Atlantic in January as she speeds along at nearly 40 mph.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  Click here for David Macaulay’s blog about the vessel that brought him to the United States.

For more info on the the SS United States Conservancy and their efforts to save the ship via repurposing, click here.    More soon . . . if not tomorrow.

By the way, in yesterday’s post, the first three fotos were as follows:  1955 Packard Clipper Super, a 1941 Cadillac Series 75 hearse, and a 1955 Buick Road Master . . . all contemporaries of the SS United States.

Many thanks to the Conservancy for the opportunity to tour the vessel.  If you have personal stories related to the vessel, please consider adding them to the comments.

Cold weather keeps me inside, where my fingers keep the keyboard warm.    I’ll start by revisiting this foto I took a warm morning in 2010.  That tugboat was 60 years old at that moment.  The easiest name to read is Ocean King, but in raised metal letters on the port bow, you might make out some other letters,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

here and

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

even clearer here on the starboard bow.    And in between those two names, she also went by David McAllister.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The following three fotos come thanks to Allen Baker.  The foto below shows Resolute in 1974 in Fells Point, when she was part of the Baker-Whitely Towing Company.    Click here and here for posts I did in Fells Point and Baltimore back in 2010.

0aaaaresolute74a

The foto below dates from 1980.  Notice Grace McAllister to the left.  At this point, McAllister had just purchased the B-W Towing Company.

0aaaares2bwfleet

The boat to the right I can’t identify.  Notice Holland and Britannia also.  Britannia was built as Thomas A. Meseck at Marvel in Newburgh NY in 1942.

0aares3bwfleet280a

It turns out that Ocean King aka Resolute was built at RTC Shipbuilding, the same yard in Philadelphia Camden as  John B. Caddell, which I last saw, sold for scrap here.

Many thanks to Allen Baker for sharing these vintage fotos.  And thanks to the folks at tugboatinformation.com, without whom I’d have a much harder time tracing back these names.

First three fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Although quite common for tugboats and other smaller craft, New York is a rare place of registry in large vessels today.  Horizon Trader belongs to the same aging Jones Act fleet as Producer, Navigator, Challenger, . . . Crusader now scrapped.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I’m way out of my depth in bringing up the Jones Act, a set of statutes regulating maritime commerce dating from 1920 sponsored by Senator Wesley Livsey Jones.  But here is a fact:  35 years old is the average fleet age of Horizon’s container vessels . . . a large if not the largest Jones Act carrier.  That compares with 12 years  . . . for the international container vessel fleet.  Source for these ages is here.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

As an untrained observer of the industry, I can state that Horizon Trader looks all of her 40 years, and again . .  as a fervent but unconnected news consumer, I’ve heard/read nothing that blemishes their safety record.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And here’s the newest development . . . Horizon will cease their commerce through New York, substituting Philly instead.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Technically Trader is a Type C6-S-85a designed for Farrell Lines by George G. Sharp, a firm with a stellar list of vessels to its name.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Enjoy the 40-year-old details.   I’d love to hear from someone who’d been onboard.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

She looks small beside Laura K. Moran.  All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

First, thanks to Birk Thomas . .  . Ice River currently in Philadelphia.  Here’s the reefer fleet list.

0aaaars1

And thanks to Mike Abegg, Alice Oldendorff, currently in the sixth boro, the vessel that started this blog over 2000 posts ago.

0aaaars2

Also, still in port, Asopus.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And just out of the repair dock, it’s Stena Primorsk, having spent weeks in or around the harbor.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And finally . . . NYK Joanna leaves town yesterday.  Watch between tug and ship, starboard side,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

here, for what has to be one

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

of the more dangerous jobs on the water.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

It’s the docking pilot leaving the vessel as it heads for sea.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Perusal of the NYK fleet shows names like Mark Twain and William Shakespeare.  I’d love to see them come to town.

Unless otherwise attributed, all  fotos by will Van Dorp.  Thanks here to Birk Thomas and Mike Abegg.

Foto from Birk.  I never noticed before how much the colors of a McAllister tug and Santa Claus are alike.  Now all Alex needs is to sport white fabric bow pudding, you to squint, and  . . . et voila!  To the right . . . I think that’s she who did a last waltz this past July.

0aaaax1

Christmas decorations on USS New Jersey?  Except this foto was taken in October.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

0aaaax3

Tugboat Lizzie with reflections  . . . and made by a frustrated retired jeweler friend of John Ericsson.

0aaaax4

a gold- and silver-plated copper tug!  Trophy material.  See more at the Independence Seaport Museum, not where the road has taken me but well worth a visit.

0aaaax5

Top foto by Birk Thomas.  All others by Will Van Dorp, who’s quite inland and equidistant from the Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico.

Sandy?  Of course, if you live inland from a beach, you may be scoured by the stuff.

These signs appeared along the NJ Turnpike today.

I had to return to the sixth boro from a little time spent in Philly.  I saw Lois Ann L. Moran (2009, Washburn & Doughty) pass quite close to Penn’s Landing, but she was way up by Fishtown by the time I could grab my camera.

High Roller (1969, Jakobson) passed also, but the light hardly allowed Roller‘s brilliance to show.  Scroll through for a foto of High Roller and her siblings with unique names in a post I did here over two years ago.  The dome is the Camden aquarium, where some float-through-and-over-anything hippos live.

Two weeks ago, these small craft bobbed resplendent in summery sunny, but now a storm that should be called stormy or squally or even super-tempestuous dulls their colors.

For now, get to high ground;  otherwise, batten ‘em down.  Dog’em.  Double’em up.

All fotos today by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s some sixth boro area tempests of past years.  As I post this (1700 hrs), Queen Mary 2, Maersk Kentucky, and Yasa Golden Dardanel are among the last large vessels leaving boro6 for the safety of sea.

gCaptain comments on vessel heading counter-to-trend with paramount urgency . . .  here.

Foto below was taken on July 3, 2012.  Charles D. McAllister . . . featured here dozens of times, was assisting British Harmony (see name on lifeboat) out of IMTT Bayonne . . . for sea.  Where?  Doubleclick enlarges fotos.

Related:  note the follow-though handwork demonstrated by the line thrower below.  Where is he?  He’s not throwing the line to anything belonging to British Harmony, but he is in the same watershed.

Ditto this tug and barge.  Where it it?  Notice the water color.  Notice the name on the barge.

MANAUS on the tug is the best clue.

All fotos in this post except the first one were taken by my daughter, Myriam, who’s on the Amazon all summer as a grad student.  I bought her a camera and said . . . “tugster needs you,” and she’s been following through since mid-May while I’ve focused mostly on my end of the sixth boro, not hers.  More on this later in this post.   That’s a sweet ride below.

She’s based in Macapa and took this and all the others from her workboat.  No, she doesn’t drive it.

Cargo moves by vessels like this, and

this.  Right now Ikan Suji is Shanghai bound with a hold filled with Amazonian raw materials, I’d bet.

My guess (and I’m often wrong) on this cargo is navigational aids in the making.

I wish she’d caught the rest of the ferry . . . but there are fewer possibilities for a bow than a stern.  I’d never imagine this house/stern arrangement.

NYC’s sixth boro  . . . as all areas . . . have their

government boats.

Behold two Amazonian “rebocadores ”  Excalibur and Merlin. Click here for Smit Rebras including some interesting newbuild fotos.  Thanks to Harold Tartell for suggesting looking here.

But, not unexpectedly, vessels on the Amazon and its many fingers are as diverse as the population of that great country.

This could be the Mississippi,

as could this.

From Macapa to Manaus upriver is 500 to 600 air miles.  Stadt Gera, in Macapa today, was in the sixth boro and on this blog  a year and a half ago.

And here’s why I put the foto of Charles D. McAllister and British Harmony first:  British Harmony is about halfway up the Amazon to Manaus as I write this.  One really can get anywhere watery from the sixth boro.    Knowing that and having concrete reminders like this are not the same.

From fishermen, people with cameras along the KVK, and Macy’s barge waiting for the 2012 Independence Day fireworks . . . to kids in wooden boats like this . . .  all seen by crew on British Harmony  on the same trip  . . . I find amazing.

I hope you enjoyed this glimpse of another watershed.   Myriam certainly has the gallivant gene.  Here’s some self-disclosure.  39 years ago  (!!) I traveled to my first professional job about 500 miles up the Congo River on a huge tugboat named Major Vangu, pushing four deck barges.  The tug had 8 or 10 “staterooms” and a bar/restaurant for paying first class passengers.   Second class were on a barge with shade, and third class slept among the cargo (barrels of fuel, trucks, crates of beer, misc .  .  .) on the other barges.  It took four days and nights to get from Kinshasa to Mbandaka, near where I spend the next two years.  The reason for the choice of a tug was the airplane was non-functioning and roads to get there would have taken weeks.   Making this realization today suggests the need for a long river trip next year. . . . hmmmm . . . .

This post is inspired by Jed’s extended resume of last April here, and a “lightbulb”  comment by Maureen.   Thanks to you both.

Related:  Several times I tried unsuccessfully to find good profile shots of Major Vangu, which sank in 1979.   Anyone have ideas on finding fotos of the old Onatra vessels like Major Vangu?

Related:  In writing this post, I stumbled onto this blog by an artist in Belem, a major Amazonian port.

Today marks the end of the four-day historic ship festival and the official opening of Pier 25.  Friday and Saturday I worked on Pegasus.  Click on that link and you can find details of her history, starting from her inception as Standard Oil No. 16, including a time when she sported the flying horse on her stack.  1907 was a recurring number in the history-oriented tour:  the date of Pegasus launch in Baltimore and the date of the opening of the Kenneth M. Murchison-designed Hoboken terminal of the Erie Lackawanna Railroad.

Drydock tug Hoboken dates from 1963, but

Yankee ferry, the only surviving Ellis Island ferry, entered service in 1907.  Click here for much more about the Philadelphia-built Yankee.

Here’s a view of Union Dry Dock & Repair company . . . from Pegasus.

Also giving tours on the water was the historic John J. Harvey.   Type Harvey into the search window on this blog and you’ll see more fotos I’ve taken over the past five years.

Folks including me took fotos of Harvey from Pegasus, just as folks on Harvey zoomed in on us.  In the cowboy hat, it’s Mitch . . . of Newtown Pentacle.

Over 150 folks enjoyed a FREE!@#@!  Hudson River ride on Pegasus Saturday.  Lucky them!!  I’m just saying . . .  this is a rare treat, and you could make it less rare by joining in this way or that.  FYI . . . the engine burns about 35 gallons per hour, if I recall correctly.

If you’re in or around the sixth boro tomorrow, you may see this scene above.  I took that foto about a month ago.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who yesterday befriended MV Algolake. a bonafide facebooking, literate ore carrier!   Be the first among your FB friends to befriend an ore carrier;  for me it’s therapeutic, helping me forget the bulk carrier Alice that has made distance between us!!

Maria J (ex-Jesus Saves) . .  .63′ loa (length overall),  you’ve seen her here at least once before;  since that link mentions vhf chatter, you must see bowsprite’s latest creations and transcriptions.   Maria J was quickly overtaken by the three Brants.  Remember, for most fotos, doubleclick enlarges.

Crystal Cutler . .  . 67′ loa, all new and shiny . . .  has been in the harbor now at most . . . three months.

Recently I saw OSG Independence . . . 131′ loa pushing barge OSG 243 .. 557′ loa, in the sixth boro for the first time.

Swarming here from left to right:  McCormack Boys … 73′ loa,  Austin Reinauer … 110′ loa, and Bohemia … 95′ loa with barge GCS 235 … 285′ loa.

The venerable Crow, a Brooklyn-built Bushey tug …. 86′ loa.   I believe Crow first appeared on the blog here, almost three years ago, back when she was “crow red.”  To hear Crow‘s horn and see its ability to raise/lower the wheelhouse, click here and see the embedded youtube at the end of that post.

Freddie K. Miller passes by in its latest colors.  Remember when she was orange and also when she was white with black/orange trim and operating for the same fleet as …

Erie Service … 98′ loa, and Eagle Service … 115′ loa here?  Beyond Eagle Service, might that be Scott Turecamo … 116′ loa?

Here’s a light Norwegian Sea .. 131′ loa and here she is

deep in the notch of DBL 103 … at least 381′ loa.  Any guesses on the build date of DBL 103?

2005 was launch date for that, from Bollinger Marine Fab.    Click here for the main Bollinger site.

Finally, here’s a mystery tug moving a deck barge through KVK last weekend.  Snow covered up the name, and it’s a tug I

can’t recall seeing before.  Help?

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who’s happy we’re in the short winter month now.

Unrelated:  If you didn’t read Megan Fraser’s comment in Non-Random Tugs 5, she embedded a link to all the photos in the exhibit at the Independence Seaport Museum in Philly.  Here’s a shortcut to the link to these fabulous images.   Thanks, Megan.

Fundraiser TONIGHT Dec 1, 2010 for the tug Pegasus!!  It’s unfortunate that I have to work elsewhere tonight.

A short post today . . .  it’s December and just to call it windy out is an understatement along the lines of saying that in winter the sixth boro is less hot than in June, that sex is just exercise, and that this video is a fenderbender.

Oh, well . . .  enjoy these fotos: Specialist II slings a string (strings along a sling?) of rock scows into the confluence of the East (so-called) River and the Hudson.  That’s

Red Hook container port in the background, with the nose of Mary Whalen protruding from behind the blue warehouse.

And here’s a catch-up from my Philly posts of last week:  when Captain Dann towed the Lockwood 2002 barge south-bound the cargo looked

all boxed up like this.  Maybe something headed south or east for Sinterklaas?

Nah.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Thanks to Carolina Salguero of PortSide NewYork for calling that video to my attention.

And since I’m linking to videos today, see this one, a music video that uses the Witte scrapyard as backdrop.  I really like the music, but I think the ship remains in the Arthur Kill location should be the main event, NOT the backdrop.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 404 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments? Email Tugster

My job . . . Summer AND Fall 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

Archives

free web page hit counter
October 2014
M T W T F S S
« Sep    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 404 other followers