You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘NYS Marine Highway’ category.

Here was Highway, the first.  As I approach the end of my sixth year doing this blog, I’m looking to recycle/update some titles.

Many thanks to L’amica dalla torre . . .  , here are fotos of Margot just after having rounded the Battery on Tuesday.  Previous fotos of Margot can be seen here and here.

Margot‘s payload is a Metso paper machine . . . although I’m not entirely sure what its function is.

Here between the leaves still on trees after a leaf-stripping hurricane and piled up snow . . .   Margot passes the mouth of the Morris Canal, to the left of the clock.  Note that red crewboat over closer to the mouth?

Here’s a closerup foto.  I can guess ownership from the shade of red, but  . . . anyone know the name?

All fotos but the last one thanks to L’amica.

Three vessels at the roundup this year appeared there for the first time .  . well sort of.   The red one, aka Augie, was in fact there for the first time.  The other . . . on the left, Frances, has been there before but with very different appearance.

Here’s a closeup of Augie, who first made a show here and here.

The surprise newcomer at the roundup this year was Wendy B, but with a bit of search, I’ve found this blog about here journey from Toronto to DC seven years ago, by the previous owners.

Click here for the specs at the time of her last sale.  Talking with the owners, I learned she was delayed in the sixth boro–on her recent northward passage–by the 4th of July 2012  fireworks.  Does anyone recall seeing her in town?  Here are my fotos of the spectacular illuminations that day.

Here’s Augie, nestled up to Cornell, in current colors.

When I saw Frances this weekend, I first assumed I was looking at Margot, currently working on Lake Ontario.

Here’s how Frances looked two years ago.

I’m enthusiastic to see Frances (1957) covered in new paint that just exudes vitality.  Soon she’ll be working like Margot, her one-year-younger sister.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated but thanks to Barbara for sending this link along:  South Street Seaport in the news.

This is the work and play post . . . the real connection is that although we all have to work, an important secret is to enjoy what you do.    Imagine this enthusiasm in a  co-worker or yourself on Monday morning, whether you’re struggling to finish a group report or

like the Villiersdorp farmers and ALE and their associates moving Alwyn Vintcent on 80 functioning wheels–at least– around Table Mountain.

If you don’t enjoy it . ..  or relish the challenge and execution,

you won’t even start the job.

This is the only way to get through obstacles that stop your progress . . .   Revel in the task  . . . like

the folks at NYS Marine Highway, now shipping corn–yes–corn–out of Ontario and into the Erie Canal.    How long has it been that agricultural commodities have been shipped on the Erie Canal . . . how long have people talked about shipping same on that waterway that revolutionized NYC . . .  or international shipping entering the Erie Canal, but Margot (over a half century young) and its crew

is actually-as we speak–

doing it!  Bravo to the folks at NYS Marine Highway.   Click here for lots more fotos of Margot.

Sun dancing is great, but the spirit that drives the dancers also animates folks

who dance with ships and lines and

get one task done safely and then move to the next and the next.

So whatever you do, whatever I do . . .

I know that if I can do it in a way that gets me satifaction and pleasure,

the better.

South African fotos come compliments of Colin Syndercombe;  the Oswego/Erie Canal fotos,   . . . Allan and Sally of  Sally W  and all the others by Will Van Dorp.

Related:  Here’s another ALE job.

Unrelated:  The longest marathon swim starts tomorrow morning over 100 miles up the Hudson.

Blue is the colour of the sky . . .”  in the Donovan song of almost a half century ago, but this isn’t a post about foliage, although I took this foto Friday . . . if you’re wondering why I didn’t post.  Guess the location?

Brown is the color of the Hudson, yesterday, as seen high above crane barge Columbia (and Sarah Ann??) viewed from Storm King, about 60 miles north of the sixth boro.

Brown flows under Margot and Benjamin Eliott at Waterford about a hundred miles north of Storm King.

It has been the color of the Hudson and feeders streams since the visitation of Irene (note the high point on the Second Street Bridge) and the rest of the rainy season in the Hudson and other Northeast watersheds.

But go another 70 or so miles north of Waterford, not far from the headwaters of the Hudson (as far north from the sixth boro as Washington DC is south!!) and the

waters through the rock

are clear, not cafe au “way too much” lait.

Twas a good place to get away and

reconnect.  Hiking here . . . offers no clue of what cliffs lie downstream.

I know I missed the arrival of tugs Justice and Reinauer Twins and who knows whatever else     . . . come through the boro, but gallivants can’t and shouldn’t be postponed.

Fotos by Will Van Dorp.   More Donovan?

And speaking of colors from inks and pigments as multi-hued as nature up north, check this out from my favorite niche-leaping, river-crossing, shipshifting cliff-dweller . . .  and so much more.

For explanations on all manner of color, checkin with seaandsky.

When I took this foto in 2006, I knew none of the folks depicted;  more about this foto at the end.

This Sunday in the sixth boro is the 19th annual tugboat race.  If you are free, come down to Pier 84.  Will Beth M. McAllister be there?  the young Pegasus?

Viking was partly there last year.  Might she race this year?

Might Tasman Sea clench her pins and sprint to the finish?

Will Bohemia lope ahead of the field?

Will Lee T Moran show just how misleading the “Gramma” part of her name is?

Will Socrates miraculously spring free from these lines and parade over the finish line first?

Will Brendan Turecamo and all these other occupied Moran vessels churn up the one-nautical-mile race course?

In previous years, the weekend following the tug race in the sixth boro, there was a tug roundup in Waterford, NY.  Bad news this year:  because of Irene’s reckless bluster and immoderate rain, the 2011 Waterford Tug Roundup  has been cancelled.  I will miss the puppytugs,

the pushoffs of fiberglass into steel,

the carefully matched performers,

the hometown favorites taking on the outatowners.    But I’m not going to miss

the hospitality of Waterford and its fine folks . . .  because I’m coming up anyhow.  See you on the 9th or 10th.

Thanks to Stray for sending along this link to fotos of Irene devastation upriver.  I feel sick.  Crow and Wire, #94, 119, and 181, were at the Roundup last year.  Black Knight, seen in a tugster post a week ago, shows up in #178.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Details today, delightful ones like the house of Crow,

stern of Margot in front of portside and rope fender Governor Cleveland,

stern of The Chancellor in front of Margot,

twin barges 1914 Lehigh Valley 79 and 1942  Pennsy 399 (venues for music and photographic displays),

stern of Wire and Governor Cleveland,

lots of stacks,

bow wave of Wire,

W. O. Decker downbound in Federal Lock,

bows of MV Bear and Seahorse (from Ontario and Connecticut, respectively),

and bow of Hestia in front of Crow.

The Roundup had two music stages this year:  New York Canal System tug Grand Erie and Lehigh Valley barge 79 .   Enjoy these snippets from a group called Tug Bitts.

Capt. Walter E. Hughes joined Tug Bitts on stage for this unlikely Johnny Cash piece.

x

(Silent version)

The Roundup begins with a parade between the Port of Albany and the wall below Lock 2 at Waterford.  Waterford is the easternmost point on the Erie Canal. From wherever they find themselves, crews and vessels begin to gather around mid-day Friday.  Benjamin Elliott headed south from Waterford,

Cornell saved fuel, waited at the wall, and met the parade just below the Federal Lock,

Crow joined in at its place of work,

Governor Cleveland, Grand Erie, and W. O. Decker traveled down from the Waterford wall,

some traveled in pairs like Chancellor and Decker,

Grand Erie and Decker,

and Gowanus Bay arrived from the south.

Some folks and boats worked en route in one way or

another.

Lots of folks and some vessels worked during the Roundup.  The fireworks barge would not have been  in place without the efforts of Mame Faye.

(Sound version)

Wind roar, spray, hiss, deep pitched throb, horns tuning up, whistles, pipes, percussion, more horns, and whoopnhollering of the crowd on Saturday night.

Fotos and video by Will Van Dorp.

More from the Roundup tomorrow.

Related:  World Canals Conference starts next Sunday in Rochester, NY.

Just back from the Roundup, but before I can relax, I want to download my fotos and put a few up.  Below is a lineup as seen from the 2nd Avenue Bridge to Peebles Island.

Another lineup, as seen from the fotog boat–Tug 44–loitering just north of the 112th Street bridge.  Many thanks to Fred and Kathy.

Left to right inside the Federal Lock, the Erie Canal’s largest and newest tugboat, Grand Erie (ex-USACE dredge tender Chartiers, 1951!!)  and Urger, (1901!) a frequent focus of this blog.  Type Urger into the search window.

Throngs crowded the waterfront in Waterford this weekend all day.

Just after dawn on Saturday fog rises from the calm waters.

W. O. Decker won the “people’s choice” vote.

Empire wins my prize for the most altered color from last year.

My thanks to the sponsors.  I appreciate your sponsorship.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  More Roundup fotos and videos this coming week.

OK, Seattle just has to wait when a bridge (that gets built over  100 miles north of the location where it’s destined to replace another bridge that has stood for 109 years)  gets shipped downriver by three tugboats AND gets covered by the NYTimes AND the Wall Street Journal.  My plan is to get fotos early tomorrow morning as it navigates between Manhattan and Hoboken or Jersey City.  For now, with many many thanks, here are fotos from Deborah dePeyster . . . as it passed by Coxsackie, where she camped out so as to ensure not missing the excitement, then

Catskill Point;

then fotos by Jeff Anzevino from the walkway and bridge at Poughkeepsie;

then Harold Tartell with fotos from Newburgh.

What the mainstream newspapers missed was the names of the tugs:  left to right:  Ruby M, Margot, and Elizabeth.

I have and will share lots more fotos from Seattle, a location seriously trying my faithfulness to the sixth boro.  But for now, my plan is to get up early enough to catch the bridge  edging somewhere tomorrow at dawn through the sixth boro.

Articles from the mainstream media are here:  NYTimes, Wall Street Journal.  New media here: DNAinfo.com, iStockAnalyst. My only criticism of these articles is that they do not specify  the names of the tugs, not to be picky or anything.

After “taking your house on a trip,” moving a bridge to somewhere is the next best thing.  Oh, what is the world coming to?

Thanks to Deborah, Jeff, and Harold for these fotos.  So if the old Willis Avenue Bridge lasted 109 years, how might you imagine the replacement for THIS one happening in 2119?

More Seattle soon.

To see a recap of the North River fireworks, click here, and for Queens/Bronx/East River fireworks foto’d by Mitch, click here.  In that foto, you can see three barges, each accompanied by a tug.  Anyone know which ones?   I mostly heard fireworks in what sounded like a north woods war, which must have chased all the fish into the deepest holes in the lakes.

On the way up, I sailed with Jeff Anzevino on Tide Rider and caught this view of NYS Marine Highway‘s  Margot‘s wake just after we had

circumnavigated this nameless

and peerless 1948 Chris Craft, which seemed to serve as waterside chase

crew for this hot air balloon, one of a half dozen launching from Poughkeepsie.

Later we headed to Portsmouth, where we talked to Bob Hassold (facing camera).  Interested in his 1966 tug (ex-Matinicus)?  It’s for sale.  See this article.  Bob runs a tugboat paraphernalia shop on the Portsmouth waterfront, where I found Thomas R. Flagg’s book New York Harbor Railroads in Color (a treasure for anyone interested in a “pre-truck intensive” when short-sea-shipping and cross-harbor shipping was the rule!) for less than Amazon’s price.    If you don’t know this book and are interested in the sixth boro, this IS a “must-read” book.  Tug Alley . . . it’s the most intense tug-oriented shop in the East . . . if not in the world–and I was not asked or paid to say that.

I love Portsmouth, up north in general . . . .  with its lights,

boats,

sights,

blue produce and brews,

planters painted in red-white-blue,

(actually these are Hudson River bottom feeders), and

the water.  Enjoy this gratuitous, top-feeder tugster-relaxing foto.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who continues gallivanting (from Puget Sound) soon.

And happy 234th . . .  read the sentiments here.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

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More Photos

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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