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This is the series for photos from all over.

First, from Bob Stopper, who makes it his business to –among other things–document Erie Canal life up in the  county where I grew up, it’s  . . . can you guess what’s under all that snow?

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It’s a hibernating Grouper.  I’ve done more than two dozen posts on this boat, which I keep hoping comes back to life.   Here’s a post that shows her working on the big lakes, the northern coast of the USA.

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And from the Maraki crew currently getting their passports stamped in the Conch Republic . . .  some Stock Island residents . . . like Robert W. Tomlinson (ex-YT-399 Numa) and

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Dutch tug turned yacht Itinerante (ex-Havendienst 1, Vulcanus).

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Here’s one of my photos:  that’s Iver Foss tailing the big ZPMC Shanghai-built crane as RORO Hoegh Shanghai follows them in through the Narrows last week.

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Some photos from Brian DeForest . . . Joyce D. Brown delivering a crane barge as

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RORO Don Juan rolls some vehicles off and some others on over in Port Newark.

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Here’s are two photos lacking a photographer both showing Tradewind Towing Rachel powering USS SS Mount Washington AOT-5076 on its final voyage.  The photo below I screen-grabbed from the Crystal Serenity, which is now off Japan.   Mount Washington is at the scrapyard and Rachel is preparing for the next job.

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This photo comes from the Gatun Locks webcam.

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Bowsprite caught these three last week:  apparent L to R, Arabian Sea, Mediterranean Sea, and Patricia in Red Hook.

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Thanks to Bob, Lucy my sister, Franco for standing in the cold with me at the Narrows, Brian, bowsprite, and the remote cameras for these photos.

The days to use the westside pedestrian/cyclist lane of the Bayonne Bridge are winding down . .  if plans are to be believed.  And then, in 2014 or so when the work is completed, the walk/cycle lane will reside on the east side.

Note the bulb of a vessel appearing between the support members.  I’m thinking that given the use of “flags of convenience” in this industry, this foto might make a suitable flag for an aquatic micronation like Republic of New Atlantis or Oceania.

Behold a possible 4892-teu vessel headed straight for the narrow channel at Mariners Harbor.

Fortunately, that trajectory will be modified by Amy C McAllister.  But I wonder, what would happen if that bow tug should suddenly lose power.

That gray console on the portside bridge wing, can I cal that a bridge wing helm station?

Note the folded forward mast.  Vessel is APL Oman.  Any guesses where she was built?  A clue is that builder is listed as a company named Daewoo.

Bruce A. McAllister acts as the starboard stern thruster.

She’s five days out of the Panama Canal. Here’s APL’s itinerary for the past two months:

2012 August 19th, 13:00:31 UTC New York
2012 August 14th, 04:00:44 UTC Balboa
2012 July 29th, 00:00:08 UTC Pusan
2012 July 27th, 08:30:05 UTC Yang Shan
2012 July 25th, 00:30:49 UTC Hongkong
2012 July 24th, 11:00:17 UTC Yan Tian
2012 July 21st, 22:00:58 UTC Yan Tian
2012 July 21st, 22:00:40 UTC Hongkong
2012 July 19th, 22:30:28 UTC Kaohsiung
2012 June 18th, 08:00:09 UTC Norfolk

The rotation is progressing well.

It seems the starboard bridge wing helm station is covered,  so portside to the dock?

Color-coded overalls keep hierarchy pronounced?

While I’m up on my vantage point overlooking Newark Bay, I have a chance to see what else is around.  From roughly far left to near right, it’s upper blue wheelhouse of DonJon boat, Bebedouro!!, an unidentified ferry, and Cashman’s drillboat Kraken.

All fotos taken today by Will Van Dorp, whose computers are happier than they were yesterday.

And the place of construction for APL Oman . .. Daewoo Mangalia in Romania!!

You’ve seen “turning 70” and other rotations, get ready for this . . . it’s a windy day on Newark Bay as

Margaret has forward starboard line and

Emma dashes to the point where a turn of greater than 90 degrees needs to be negotiated to rotate into the

KVK.

The calculations of forces resisting and favoring this turn go way beyond my mere high school physics, and my high school physics class was more than 40 years ago.

I’m guessing what’s happening was accounted for by Newton and I’d enjoy hearing a description of forces like resistance caused by hull and keel design, ideal speed for flow across the rudder, and coordinated push of the two tugs deployed such that 5100 hp is near stern and 3000 hp opposite but toward the bow;  and taking into account the current/tide and wind.

But ultimately, I suppose the principles are the same as turns a canadagosling.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

This foto shortchanges both Porto–container vessel at Howland Hook–and whatever aircraft flies above it.  Which aircraft . . . you may wonder?

This one!!  Or these ones.

Astride the Boeing’s shoulders is OV-101, the engineless shuttle that never entered space, escorted

by a T-38 chase plane.

They checked out the Bayonne Bridge and

scoped out progress on the still second-tallest building in Manhattan,

as closeup as they could . . .

and flew over Newark Liberty International before landing at Kennedy.  The foto below is a clue to my special platform for these shots . . . to be revealed tomorrow.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Check out John Skelson’s fotos here.  And great landing fotos here by John Huntington.  Still more here by Mai Armstrong.

Ultimately,Enterprise will be barged upriver and be preserved as part of the Intrepid Sea, Air, and Space Museum.  To make room for OV-101, the museum has sent three aircraft upriver, literally: MiG-15, a Douglas F-3D Skyknight, and a Supermarine Scimitar.  To see them barging upriver to ESAM, be at the Waterford Flight of Five tomorrow.

And on the subject of preservation, a request . . . tug Pegasus and Lehigh Valley 79 need your vote to demonstrate the power of social media and, thereby, win a grant.  Vote DAILY!!

Click on the logo below, register, scroll thru to find “Tug Pegasus and Waterfront Museum Barge,”  and vote once a day through May 21.  Ask your friends to vote too.

 

Answer can be found at the end of this post.  I was thrilled to find this sixth boro foto today.  Shot appears to be towards the northwest, but I’m not certain yet.  It appears to be a merge of two fotos.  On lower left side of my original foto the handwritten number “1906” is visible.  A date?  Maybe not.  Doubleclick enlarges.

Now we sweep from right to left.  I see at least a “stick deck barge” and an Erie covered barge on this side of the pier, which has a crane on it.  Then a ?? 200′ unfinished steel vessel, something beyond that, and a four-masted schooner farther still at a dock.

Middle sections shows steamer Ursula and an unidentified (by me) vessel “south” of the cove off its stern.  I can’t quite make out details in the cove.  There was an Ursula that operated at one point between the Battery and Glen Island (near New Rochelle.)  Another  shot of Ursula appears in this 1919 foto. Beyond the many buildings on this part of the island . . . at least two hulls surrounded by scaffolding?

More manufacturing buildings and a larger “wooden stick barge.”  Lettering on the white building says “Standard Shipbuilding Corp.”    That should be the clue that identifies this place.  But did they operate here only between 1917 and 1921?  Could 10,000 workers have operated here daily?

It’s Shooter’s Island as I could never have imagined it!!  Click here for some Standard/Shooters built vessels.  One of these Standard/Shooters vessel–SS San Tiburcio–was mined and sunk in 1940 and now attracts divers, as here.  Of course, the most famous Shooter’s product must be Meteor III, launched Feb 25, 1902 (click here for a very detailed NYTimes account of the event) which eventually was broken up at a site not far from Shooters.   More on that later, I hope.  An interesting note on the christening of Meteor III . . . the act was done by Alice Roosevelt, who later . . . 1959, also christened the USS Theodore Roosevelt SSBN-600.  Can anyone point me to fotos of Meteor III aka Aldebaran when she came back to the sixth boro for scrapping?

Foto thanks to Ed Fanuzzi, whose father worked on ships on Shooters.    I’ll never be able to look at Shooters the same again.

Has anyone published a Shooters Island shipbuilding book?

>><<Vote for tugster blog for “best neighborhood blog” and “best foto blog”  in the Village Voice Web Awards.  Ask a friend to vote too . . . click  here .>><<

First, fotos I didn’t take include ones of a half dozen sailors riding the Staten Island ferry this past  Sunday.  These days that’s not a common sight. Should I have said . . . Can I take your picture?  I usually don’t take close-ups of people, at least not strangers.  Of course, if USS Iowa had been homeported here, seeing sailors on the ferry would have been routine.   Bitterness persists in some circles about the Navy pulling out of Homeport Staten Island.  Here’s what’s happening on that space . . . although as of Sunday, the federal buildings are still standing.

Now a foto I did take.  Can you see the rest from this?

FFG-28 USS Boone was in town this past weekend after its last deployment before decommissioning, scheduled for February 2012.  Anyone fill me in on what chain of events that sets into motion?  Do all personnel get reassignment?  Will it be mothballed?  Is sale to another country a possibility?

Since this is a “thin-ice” post . . . I’m parading my unfamiliarity, here’s a vessel I saw over in Newark Bay Sunday.  Pilot boat?

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Late tonight I anticipate strolling through Penn Station as part of my transit from work to sleep; usually I run, but on Halloween it means the parade has wound down and that all types of creatures will inhabit that transit ecolabyrinth.  Halloween in New York and most places in the US produces a mix of the grotesque, macabre, sexy, and just plain bizarre.  This post is intended to mirror the spectrum of the menagerie I expect to see tonight.  Meanwhile, to see Halloween aboard MV Algolake, go to their Faceboook site. 

Start with the raised Helen Parker, which capsized and sank off Manhattan earlier in the month.  These fotos come thanks to Jerseycity Frankie.   No one was physically hurt, although

feelings certainly suffered.   Here’s more on the story.

Halloween critters in Penn tonight will be diverse, hard to identify.  Any thoughts on this foto I took yesterday?

Seatrout . . . here she be!  I’ll bet they don’t serve smoked salmon on board.

Taken yesterday also . . . right near where some fisherman pulled out a 37″ striper.  Guesses?

Misplaced oculus?

It’s Tsereteli!  Enjoy these other manifestations of the Georgian sculptor.  He might write his name as  ზურაბ წერეთელი  . . .  that kind of Georgian.

In any parade, some costumes are simply unidentifiable by the uninitiated.  Like this, which stands as a piece of post-industrial sculpture just behind the A&P in Bergen Point Bayonne, between Elco Boat Basin and the old Esso yard.  Can anyone identify its former use?  Speaking of the old Esso yard, here’s an old piece of British newsreel showing response and cleanup after a quite tragic June 1966 tanker collision and explosion there.    Here’s the NTSB report.

Here’s a foto I took yesterday, tribute to the surprise pre-Halloween snowfall.  APL Qatar was about to be backed down for departure for sea.   More fotos of Qatar soon.

OK, this was a season and a half ago, harbinger of a pre-Samhain snowfall.  Get ready for indian summer.  Beginning of summer 2011–Coney Island style–was documented here, here, and here.

Finally, here’s another shot from the Lady Liberte parade.  If you haven’t done so already, check out bowsprite’s reaction  . . . at least  . . . to this vessel being in town.  “Lightship” just doesn’t have the energy of the name for this class of vessel in some other languages:  for example in Danish, it’s a fyrskib.  See fyrskibs and much much more here.

Top two fotos come from Jerseycity Frankie . ..  all others by will Van Dorp.

Here’s last year’s Halloween post about a trip to Issuma.  Issuma today is off Alaska after having sailed east to west across the Northwest Passage!! And I could have taken a leave and gone with . . . ah silly me.

Latest word on MV Algolake and the Great Lakes in general, looks like I’ll spend Thanksgiving with my sister in Michigan, after stopping briefly in Toledo and Detroit.

For a walking  lunch, the  crescent along the Elizabethport side of  Arthur Kill ‘s northeast end tip satifies.  It’s no picnic, but many worse places come to mind. 

Yesterday I arrived, sandwich in hand, at 1:07, to catch Evening Tide headed for Newark Bay following

Evening Mist.  1:09

By 1:32 I had reached the end of the park and glanced at Mariner’s, where Maryland lay.Pegasus rounded the bend at the east end of Shooter’s and passed me at 1:36

1:40    Turecamo Girls and

(1:41)  Gramma Lee T were returning from a ship assist I must have missed.

1:43  Meanwhile, Patapsco and McAllister Responder headed southbound into the Kill.  1:44

McCrews, which I’ve never seen before, headed into Newark Bay.  1:44

All fotos yesterday by Will Van Dorp.  Now I mentioned the “crescent” earlier because this “park” where I walked was once a shipyard.  Crescent Shipyard made submarines;  fotos here.  It went by other names before and after, but of them all, now there is no trace.  Seems a shame.

Here’s Random Tugs 66.   The foto of Quenames in the Gowanus comes thanks to Vladimir Brezina, the bow of whose vessel intrudes ever so slightly into the bottom of the foto.  Doubleclick enlarges.

Eddie R of Interport Towing and Transportation steams through the harbor with 1 WTC in the background.    More 1 WTC views soon.  Eddie R‘s fleet sibling Lucinda Smith is here.

Maryland . . . northbound toward 1 WTC.

Red Hook Grain Terminal in the background, Christine M. McAllister pushes Reinauer RTC 502.

Elk River exits the east end of the KVK, with white cranes in the background at Global Terminal.

Torm Anne gets ushered in by Gramma Lee T Moran.

Ross Sea pushes a deep-loaded barge.  In the distance, a small portion of the Brooklyn Army Terminal.

Farther upriver Patty Nolan finds herself alone at the dock surrounded by a thin layer of ice that

in the brackish water over in Newark Bay would not form.  That’s Port Elizabeth to the northeast.

Last shot:  a nameless pusher tug on the high and dry at an undisclosed location north of the Tappan Zee aka (but rarely) Malcolm Wilson Bridge.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, except of course the one by Vladimir.

The Bayonne Bridge has stood astride this blog from Post #1, and yet, I’ve never slung my lenses over its walkway.  Truth be told, I rarely view  the sixth boro FROM the Bridge;  instead the Bridge frames my view . .  . . fills background.  Richard Wonder–who previously submitted this wonderful shot of John B. Caddell almost four years ago–has convinced me with this next stunning series of shots that views from that bridge must lie in my future.

Yang Ming Efficiency slides inbound.  Might that be Ellen port (along) side?

I’m wondering what the large “granular” load is in the open-top containers. . . . castings?

Heading toward Shooter’s Island, Efficiency begins a rotation to starboard.  That’s either Charles D. or McAllister Responder between Efficiency and Shooter’s.

To execute the turn, Margaret Moran plays stern thruster with all

its might.

All fotos by Richard Wonder.  Thank!!

Related:  The NYTimes this morning ran an article on those links between this bridge, Savannah, Panama, and August 15, 2014.

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