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Bear with me here.  I got up at 0430 and caught the 0535  Long Island Railroad (LIRR) to Penn Station.  On the LIRR, marathoners.  In Penn, I caught the #1 subway to the Staten Island Ferry (SIF);  at 0615, it was standing room only on the subway, worse than on a work day rush hour except all marathoners.  These are the stairs leading up to the SIF, all marathoners almost.

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Here’s from the roof of the ferry terminal on Staten Island looking south.  See that line of people?

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They’re all waiting for a shuttle bus ride (approx 3 miles) to the starting line.

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I was there to watch a particular marathoner, so I made my way to a pier.   Double click on these fotos to enlarge them.  The FDNY water display was intended for all 48,001 marathoners, including my favorite, who has the distinction of  being accommodated to pass UNDER the bridge rather than over it.

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Recognize her?

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Escorted along the end of this leg of her ongoing marathon by Marjorie B. and Robert E. McAllister, it’s

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you guessed it, the only contestant to negotiate the sixth boro, Alice Oldendorff.   If you’re new to this blog, type Alice into the upper left search window and you’ll see the particulars between Alice and me.

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I recall seeing Alice back in 2005, and since then she’s deliver several million tons of Canadian maritime aggregates into the port, the stuff you need to build and maintain a metropolis.   She’s an indefatigable marathoner.

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What a day for her to arrive.

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All fotos and fabricated view of reality by Will Van Dorp.

For NY Daily News pics of the race, click here.

Some random shots from–more or less–a year ago . . . October 23, 2012 and

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the eerie calm before the storm.

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October 29, 2012, in a different part of the sixth boro, here’s the last look of an intact boardwalk.

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October 30, 2012, floating toothpicks . . . and waterlogged cars.

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October 31, 2012 and unexpected vessels in the sixth boro . . . Wright, Kennedy, and Gallatin.

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Scroll through more post-Sandy–the week after–here.    Large parts of the damaged shoreline areas . . . they are still as they were and depressing to look at, but better that than hastily rebuilt places as they were before, vulnerable again.

Meanwhile . . . now there’s been a storm on the other side of the Atlantic . . . .

If you’re going to the market event in Manhattan today, look for signs like this, painted what must be Ceres

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blue.  This is the west end of the Brooklyn Navy Yard, closest to Vinegar Hill.   Beyond the East River there, protruding into the sky to the right, that’s the empire State Building.   Ceres has arrived, and

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on schedule!

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Inside this warehouse, I picked up my order of Ricker Hill Orchards vinegar and Champlain Valley Apiaries  honey.

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Excuse the poor quality foto.  Could someone explain the dried (?) birds’ wings?

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There was seaweed . . .

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pumpkins,

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wild artichokes,   and much much more.

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Agger Fish–right next to the warehouse–was a sponsor of the Brooklyn event, as were Brooklyn Grange, triple island, and Marlow & Daughters.

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Morgan O’Kane played, parents shopped and talked, and and kids danced.

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If you’re local and  have time, get down to the New Amsterdam Market today . . . on the opposite side of the river here.

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Congratulations to Erik and the team for a very big accomplishment.  Although there’s lots of work left this season, season two starts up soon.   Here’s some preliminary info on the vessel, which was modified in the construction. In case you’re wondering . . . Erik’s estimate is that Ceres sailed only about twenty percent of the trip.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who alone is responsible for any errors in reporting.

Here, here, and here are my previous Ceres posts.   Last but not the least least . . . it’s bowsprite’s rendering.  Here’s the NYTimes version.

Here was part a of this series.  Twelve hours after arrival, Balder could already be 25,000 tons lighter, although I’m not sure at this writing at what hour of darkness the discharge began.

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But in daylight as by night, the Cats labor to keep the salt piled for maximum space efficiency.  Since I’ve not done it, I can only imagine what a time lapse of the unloading process–in say 60 seconds–would look like as the great orange hull rises in the water as a mountain–with Cats scrambling laboriously– grows on shore.

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Periodically the flow of salt stops along this nearly 300′ long arm, and

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the traveling deckhouse,  covering the unloading machinery and keeping the process virtually dustless, trundles over a still loaded portion of the hold.   The fotos below come from the MacGregor site.

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Notice the Empire State Building–almost 10 miles distant– in the foto below, just down and to the left from the starboard side lifeboat.

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Here’s another shot showing Balder‘s traveling deckhouse.

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Salt goes off the portside while fuel enters to starboard from

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Doubleskin 33 squired by –here–Quantico Creek.

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All fotos–and narrative–by Will Van Dorp, who is solely responsible for any factual errors and who is grateful to Brian DeForest for permission to observe and take fotos of this process.  I’d also LOVE to accompany Balder for the six-week 6000-mile voyage to the Chilean desert for more seasonings to tame your wintry commute.

Returning to the foto above, notice the creamy colored hull intruding from the right . . . well, more on that tomorrow.

Postscript:  Balder might have loaded this salt in Patache, in northern Chile.  Click here for a CSL article on Balder’s South American bulk trades.

 

It’s appropriate that this was Salt 6.  You’ll understand as you go through this post and the next one.

Just like it’s appropriate that this Cat is prowling.

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Wonder what’s the relationship between this dark shape arriving and safe driving and even on safe walking on streets in the lit-up Manhattan in the distance?

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Balder is in port with almost 50,000 tons of crystals from the deserts of Chile aka road . . .

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. . .  salt.

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She drifts in silently and crews make her fast.

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Can you imagine doing this in a February or any other cold month sixth boro?

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Well  . . . it happens

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again and again, ship after ship, with utmost concern for safety.

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Balder (2002) features a self-unloading system.

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Once all lines are secured along with customs check and other paperwork,  partial crew change .  . .

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While some of the city sleeps, Balder’s arm stretches forth and the Cats get to work.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who is very appreciative for Atlantic Salt terminal manager Brian DeForest’s permission to  be in the yard.

 

Here was 13 . . . from what seems ages ago.

And the next few?  A freak snowfall in the sixth boro?

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And might these be protest signs?

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Not at all!  Today is open house in lots of places in NYC, including the “salt pile” aka Atlantic Salt.  And kids at local schools have prepared banners to adorn a ship.

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This ship . . .  already seen in this blog last week here.  Here and here are fotos I took at the “salt pile” previously.

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. . . out of the mouths [and from the brushes and paintpots] of babes . . .  and young’uns come some impressive sentiments.

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Fotos 4 through 7 were taken by Brian DeForest, Terminal Manager, who also took the first six fotos here.  The others . .  Will Van Dorp.

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Aug 31.  A late summer day at the beach, where a new “towel drying rack” has been adopted and a bumper crop

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of sand awaits the erosion of winter, perhaps?  All photos here taken by Barbara Barnard.

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Sept 1.  A tug (Trevor?) moves a crane barge to where the “drying rack”/piping needs to be fished out for transport to the next job.

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Sept 13.  The remaining pipe on the beach, no longer serving to dry swimmers’ towels, awaits dismantling and

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allows for closer inspection.

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This Rockaway series was of course motivated by Hurricane Sandy and the photos of Rockaway by my friend Barbara in the past 12 months.  Barbara, many thanks.   Here was my Nemo to Flag Day post, which started with a mystery house.

And now it looks like the Nola “make it right” rebuilding plan is coming to the Rockaways.  Click here for the design for “resilient house.”    Here’s an earlier article.

Click here for a project/business entirely created by the devastation of trees during the storm.  It’s not maritime, water,  or even specifically landthreshold related, but is quite interesting.

Here’s where the “leverman” sits for a twelve-hour shift as the C. R. McCaskill slews port to starboard 400′ once each three and a half minutes.   Another way of saying that is  the dredge moves using a five-point mooring system: two swing anchors, two breast anchors and one stern anchor to move forward or back.  A different configuration uses a spudded idler barge;  in this case, the “swing” is longer and takes more more time.   Food gets delivered so that the leverman aka dredge operator can monitor all these screens and respond so that dredging can proceed 24/7 as long as equipment and conditions permit.  More on food later.

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Slewing . . . drawing on cables attached to positioned anchors and pivoting on a stern point . . . requires that the 30” diamater hose be able to flex.  Hence, the easy curved slack before the piping to the beach.

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The crewboat in the distance alternates between hydrographic survey work and other tasks.  More on that in a moment.  More crewboats in a future post.

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Attachment at the stern is a ball and socket joint . . . like your hip.

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Here’s the starboard GE engine, part of the power supply to the dredge.

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Here is another view of the two huge hull-mounted pumps that do the work.

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Another task of the crewboat is illustrated here:  recreational boaters sometimes allow their curiosity to override any sense of danger caused by a busy, slewing dredge.

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The helicopter happened to be here on assignment to photograph the work from the air.

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About the food, here’s  mission control presided over by Edwina Arthur, a member of the 30-50 person crew.

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Food rules and pecking order are clearly posted.

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Captain Randy Guidry, my host for this tour,  proudly displays the builder’s plate, Corn Island Shipyard in Indiana, where the hull was constructed.

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As I stated in the previous post, McCaskill’s part in the dredging/beach replenishment has now ended and vessels and crew have moved south for the next job.

Many thanks to Captain Guidry, Jan Andrusky, and all the other fine folks at Weeks Marine for this tour.

All fotos, text, and (any inadvertent errors) by Will Van Dorp.

Here and here are previous posts on a Rockaway Beach replenishment dredging operation that has now ended.   Sea Wolf is still local, but the vessel on the horizon (“atop” the red buoy) has now moved to southern NJ.  Remember, for most fotos, doubleclick enlarges.

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Weeks’ Trevor was assisting in this project.

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Also assisting was George W.

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But here’s the powerhouse, the dredge.  Let’s take a tour.

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In spite of about 16,000 total horsepower, C. R. McCaskill is not self-propelled.  To see what towed the dredge to the south, see the foto at the end of this post.    All that power moves the cutterhead on the submerged arm (called a “ladder”) that extends to the sand at the bottom of the Channel here.  At the top end of the ladder are two huge pumps (you could stand inside the pump housing) that suck the sand and whatever else off the bottom and send it as a slurry to a point on the beach some miles away.  Click here for a pdf that shows the beautiful (ok . . . roll your eyes) virgin red cutterhead with green teeth.    Each tooth weighs around 35 pounds!

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Here inside the dredge are some interesting astounding facts about the machine.

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See the sand colored building on the horizon off the stern of McCaskill?  That’s the area around 105th St. Rockaway Beach where the sand is headed through piping powered by this vessel.  The first few fotos in this post were taken at that beach.  There’ll be another Rockaway post soon.

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Candace towed C. R. McCaskill south.  I missed her when she was in town, but John Skelson caught her here.  Click on the foto to see John’s complete shot.  Many thanks to John for use of that shot from his Flickr page.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp, except for the one shared by John Skelson.  For more info on each of the Weeks tugs, click here.  More McCaskill tomorrow.

Random, recent, and variously sourced.

The closeup of Nanticoke pushing Doubleskin 57 toward the Goethals Bridge below comes compliments of Allen Baker.

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I took this foto of Robert E. McAllister.

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Marie J. Turecamo here assists Barney Turecamo, pushing

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the 118,000 barrel barge Georgia.

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Four of the Dann Marine tugs:  l to r, Emerald, Chesapeake in the distance, First,  and Calusa . . . all Coast.

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Pegasus . . . the former John E. McAllister and so much more . . . the only tug in the sixth boro that today still excurses (yup . .  that’s a word!) for the public.

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First Coast, the former

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Morania No. 18 . . .  See the traces of “R–A–N” in the painted metal?

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Over in the East River, it’s Bruce A. and

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Charles D. McAllister.   See the McAllister striped Rosenwach wooden water tank on the building upper skyline left?

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From l’amiga .  .  it’s another shot of Patricia, a 1963 tug built in Port Deposit, MD.

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And last but not least . . .  just cellphone-snapped by chance by Birk Thomas yesterday, it’s Miss Lis, which at this writing is about to steam past Sandy Hook on her way out of the sixth boro.  What’s remarkable about this foto is that Birk caught this Tradewinds tug in the last two miles of a journey that started in LA!   I feel like there should be a brass band playing or some other celebration of completion.   Click here to my previous “seeing” of another Tradewinds tug.

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Click on this foto below . . . and if you have a Facebook account, you should be able to see Tradwinds Towing’s FB page.

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Fotos should be credited as I tried to indicate;  non credited ones by Will Van Dorp.

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

My Parrotlect Flickrstream

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More Photos

Seth Tane American Painting

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Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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