You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘new year’ category.

The foto below is Nellie Crockett, a 1925-6 Tangier Island “buy boat” that may never have cleaved sixth boro waters, but–used with permission here from the FB page Chesapeake Bay Buy Boat–certainly conveys the notion of a workboat decorated for the end-o-year holidays.

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The rest of these fotos come courtesy of Justin Zizes, taken earlier this week in the Hudson off the west side of mid-town.   Circle Line does lights this way.  Here’s how you could get on board.

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Nearby, World Yacht does it this way.  And although you can’t get on for the end-o-year holiday, there are many other events.

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Notice anything interesting about this arrangement?  Look to the left side of the foto.

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It’s Sea Bear aka Sea Gus as the red-nosed draft animal.

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Here’s that same small tug without the Rudolphian accoutrements.

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Many thanks to Justin Zizes and to Chesapeake Bay Buy Boats for permission to use these fotos.

In the next week or so, if you take a foto of a workboat–or mariner– with colored lights a la Christmas, please send it to tugster.  I could possibly even come up with a gift for what we deem as the best foto.   By the way, I’m still mildly obsessed with finding a foto of the 1997 transport of the Rockefeller Center tree down the Hudson via tug Spuyten Duyvil and barge.

And what is the story of Sea Bear aka Sea Gus?  It looks to be cut of the same plans as 8th Sea.

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Bonne annee from Savannah, but look who’s working:  crews of Maersk Jenaz and tugboat Bulldog.

Except this bridge officer, maybe.

Transfighter heads out in the setting sun to meet 2010 at sea.

Diane Moran travels upriver for an assist.

Another shot of Diane Moran with Cape Charles farther back and Peacemaker to the right.

And a final shot for now . . . Cape Henlopen upriver as well.

More soon.  Happy New Year whether you’re at work or play.  Ooops!  In honor of Conrad‘s steam whistles tonight, which I’ll miss, check out Susie

King Taylor‘s whistles as well as

the calliope on Georgia Queen.

Party at least a little tonight (in the blinking of an eye if that’s all the time you can afford).  Happy 2010.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Here was the first post in this series.  Some months back I wondered what this vessel was;  only by the time it had sailed a thousand miles southward did I realize it was a dredger, B. E. Lindholm.  If only I had gone around the barge here at the east end of Caddell’s . . .  .   But I was in a hurry that morning.   Kenny Wilder took these fantastic dredge fotos for which I am grateful.  All my hopper dredger fotos are too far away to demystify the bottom vacuuming business.   More Lindholm fotos can be found here.

Great Lakes Dredge & Dock has a hopper dredger in the harbor right now, but my shots are

always too far off.  This trailing suction hopper dredger is called Padre Island.

Here’s a GLDD clamshell submerged and probing the topography of the bottom of the bay,

emerging,

and re-submerged.

Here’s a hydraulic excavator.  The equipment is mammoth.

Deeper, deeper, the task seems herculean and somewhat futile at the same time, except it’s not.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

To see how the huge dredger Leiv Eiriksson is put together, click here.

Dredging . . . besides being essential work of the harbor, it reminds me of how my consciousness works:  each morning, whatever the hour, when I wake up, my perception is affected by whatever topography of my memory is then exposed.  It may be peaks or valleys or even human-created highs and lows.  Stuff resolved or not but accepted last week or last year needs to be dealt with again and again.  Not that I’m a slow learner, just new perspective brings new doubts, refreshed hopes.  Unsettling, pun intended.  I suppose this makes a post about dredging an apt end-of/beginning-of  year post.

Related to dredging is dealing with the nagging stuff that comes up in many of our consciousnesses as relates to getting along with people.  A type of post I’m thinking to add is an advice column.  Being on Georgia backroads now with only a quite blank laptop,  I have no sixth boro fotos to illustrate, but here’s a an example, which–@!%&*#@–sounds so much like Shakespeare that I’ll just modify this synopsis of Midsummer Night’s Dream. . . except this writing happens to be  midwinter.

Sample advice seeker whom I’ll call “December dredgerist”  —-

Dear Tugster, My crewmate Mori (married to a lubber Elfin Princess . . . aka EP) feels profoundly attracted to Tori (a lubber), and Tori feels deeply attracted to  Luis. EP loves Mori but also–being elfin–has strong attractions and liaisons with a plethora of  fairies, sprites, nymphs, mermaids, and sirens, and other magical creatures of the forests, islands, tidepools, hills… all of which is fine with Mori, who understands elfins and their openness about Mori and Tori.  There is neither pressure to change anything nor complications that exist, but (I’m writing for Mori) Mori wants to know if you could dig into your experience to help Mori either attract Tori or deal with her lack of attractedness to him without turning into an ass.  Many thanks… December dredgerist.

Henry Fuseli Titania and Bottom circa 1790
My response:  Dear Decemberist:  Tell Mori that change is the only constant, and since I have no control over the elves, sprites, and other magical creatures that make  stuff happen in your/my lives, just  . . . do what you’re doing–be sweet or salty or neutral according to your custom and … ride out the hurricanes, calms, ebbs, surges.  May your anchor hold tight in spring tides as in lows.  Dress warmly, and always wear a life jacket.

Lame, maybe?  Any  advice for either the advice giver or the advice seeker?  Much appreciated, and  Auspicious 2010!  Enjoy the midwinter’s full moon.  I’m starting to make my way down the Savannah watershed.

PS:  If your advice to me is to call off this column and terminate the personals-dredging, I’ll consider it.

Unrelated:  check out the mini-tug on Gypsy pirate wench! Fair winds to her as she joins Amistad!

Being on inland roads for now and rendered somewhat blank-in-the-head, I’m happy to finally use these relief crew fotos.  Call this a ship-tease or port-tease post.  Look them over closely and guess the location.  Answer and stories at the end of the post.  A sub and a trawler headed for sea . . . sounds vaguely like the start of a joke?

and  Zeus enters port . . . now that sounds like a mythological tale, fractured or otherwise.  So where?

SeaBart aka Uglyships sent me these.  He writes:  “The fishing boat & the submarine pic is made by my wife in  January 2006 in Den Helder, the official navy port of the Netherlands.  The fishing vessel is obvious:  every port in the Netherlands has it’s own fishing fleet, going out on Sunday evening/Monday morning coming back Friday or Saturday.”

And Zeus:  “has 2 main engines driving one propellor, bollard pull is 101 ton, and from what I heard although she has only one prop she is a very manoeuvrable ship. Finnish flag but she had a Dutch master until he retired a few years ago. On the picture she is just entering Den Helder. She is on the spotmarket and is mostly used for rig moves, when she isn’t chartered usually she is stand-by in Den Helder. I have no idea when the pic is taken because, as I said, she is coming & going.
Den Helder is besides navy-port also the most important offshore-port in the Netherlands. The big oil-companies have bundled their supply-vessels in a pool: the Southern North Sea pool (SNS-Pool), about 12-15 vessels all operating from Den Helder, which gives a tremendous amount of traffic to and from the port, almost too much. On a daily base you see 4 or 5 suppliers coming & going and a lot of shifting  going on in the port it self. If you have a berth, then it’s not for sure that you can keep it…….very annoying!”

Thanks, Bart.  Gelukkig nieuwjaar!   And I say that and a hearty thank you to all who read, in whatever language, patois, or register you say that.

While we’re on the topic of year’s-end, thanks to my referrers, the top 10 of whom for 2009 I list below for special thanks.  A glass of whatever exuberance-bubbles I certainly owe you; please collect.

10   Google Reader

9   WordPress

8   propercourse.blogspot.com

7   samgreenfield.com/log

6   bowsprite.wordpress.com

5   intheboatshed.net

4   urban-archology.blogspot.com

3   70point8percent.blogspot.com

2   San Diego Union-Tribune, who picked up my  US Air Salvage post

1   gcaptain.com/maritime/blog

And staying on stats a moment, my top 10 posts for the year are:

10   Mermaid Parade 2009

9   Ghosts

8   Figureheads

7   More Mermaid Parade 2009

6   NYC Tugboat Race 2009

5   Mardi Gras

4   NYC Tugboat Race

3   Pleasure Tugs 2

2   Weeks and Flight 1549 Re-Emerges

1   Equinox

Now I’m not saying these are my favorites or most-representative posts . . . just statistics.

For an example of one of my favorites, how about this:  magic in the mists by the Kill.

Looking northwest from Stone Mountain toward Kennesaw Mountain (roughly from greater Atlanta toward northern Alabama) around the start of the new year and

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teaching my grandson the basics of using a compass, I’m

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wondering–like everybody–what the year will bring, which direction (s) it’ll turn.  As the original inhabitants depicted in this statue of a Cherokee fisherman in Chattanooga on the southern bank of the Tennessee, we all need basic sustenance for starters.

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Where we head keeps us guessing.  The Tennessee heads south from greater Knoxville and then west and north to empty into the Ohio before its waters feed the Gulf of Mexico.  The Coosa, here in headwaters near Atlanta, heads into Mobile Bay as the Alabama.

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Not far away, the Chattahoochee heads for the Florida panhandle,

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carrying these driftboat trout fisherman along for a new year’s day ride.

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Tomorrow I head for the Carolina coast and then to the sixth boro and then . . . who really knows.  Driftboat anyone?

Of course, many bright happy spots and fine people surround me this dark solstice.  Yet, I have to consciously remind myself of this brightness sometimes, given how bleak this time of year can seem, and especially this December.  So . . . an especially cheery thought is that, given the best scientific knowledge on merfolk migration, the next parade mermaids and consorting sirens is only six months away now.  So how’s about some aides-memoires from summer 08 . . . music for the season . . . like the  East Village Sea Monster Marching Band, or

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Santa of the sands, his chariot guided thru the seas back to the boro by a purple-eyed pooch and rearview red-tailed African gray, and

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some of his helpers.

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With such thoughts floating through my head, I think I’ll survive the darkness, the monochromatic city, where sometimes

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spirits just don’t sparkle or fizz and

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even some favorites look black & white.

Buoyed by the impending mer-migration back north, I feel better.  Happy “getting past winter solstice,” be jolly, thanks for reading the blog, and huzzah that the next mer-parade in the boro is only a mere 4300+ hours away!

All fotos always unless otherwise attributed by Will Van Dorp.

Blogging keeps rewarding me with tendrils extended my way by folk I’d otherwise never meet. Thanks to David, I just learned of a blog outa Wisconsin named gardengrow (new link on left) and colourful Nassau tug Snapper.

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Above, colourful reflection of Manhattan and an unidentified tug beside a crane barge preparing to lift the Empire State building? Below, the venerable Crow, antique red sibling of Cheyenne, built in Brooklyn 45 years ago.

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Stemming the tide northbound on North River it’s Scott C, less than a year old out of Rhode Island.

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Anchored off the Narrows, it’s Treasure Coast, twice Scott C’s age, out of Maryland.

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And tugging [ ;) ]for inclusion here is this foto of colourful decorations in Chinatown.  Happy Year of the Rat, our industrious brother.

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All images, Will Van Dorp

The new year sun breathed hot on the snowy hillside above the Winooski

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forcing a melt. And as the water I am, I sought my level

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to find the bell had “told” … this vessel to move

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and frogma announced this one seeks a new master. It’s a steal.

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It seems like yesterday Rosemary Ruth splashed back in, and …

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it feels like I’ve been gone for ages. Call me Rip v Winkle.

First you decide on a course. Or someone commands you to steer a course. Then, if you’re at the helm of 80-year-old tug Governor Cleveland, here’s what you act on, a conventional wheel.

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If you’ve at the helm in the upper wheelhouse of Janice Ann Reinauer (see bottom foto at that link), you’ll steer just as well with the tiny monkey-fist knob on the joystick lower right.

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I wonder how helmsmen will steer ships 80 years from now and what courses will hold value.

Steering or not, we’re all nearly at the end of another year. This is my last post for 2007 and until mid-January. It’s time –as happened last year– to head up the Winooski.  If you’re in New York, steer your way down to South Street any day now to see the Peking move!  Or steer yourself down to the Narrows to see the three Queens . That’ll happen a week or so after Three Kings Day.

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2007 has brought me its highs and lows. Thanks for reading and commenting. Enjoy the archives. I wish you all a better 2008. Peace everywhere and joy!  This last foto by coyote.

or heeze for tugster new year . . . maybe it’ll get added to all the others here on wikipedia. Since I’ve no fotos of my favorite sea grapes (ctenophores), I’ll blow some underwater fireworks,

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find a clear space to offer you a virtual glass to fill

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from whatever my net hauls up . . . along with all the treasures of the past year,

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happy new year from the sixth boro!!

Special thanks to frogma for posted some great 6th boro sponge shots today!! Kinda reminds me of the first time I snorkeled in Folly Cove (near Gloucester, MA) and spotted gorgeous pink anemones on a ledge about 10 feet down.

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My job . . . Summer 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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