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Three years ago and a day exactly, I did a point-by-point comparison among QE2, QM, and QV.   I attempt something similar here.  I’ll throw out some names too, which wil be identified by the end of the post.  First set of names:  Olsen, McNaught, and Wells.  Know ‘em?

The foto above and the one below . . . the bows of the two most recent Queens seem … identical?

Their cleavage . . . at least that which cleaves the waters .  . .

however, is not equally exposed.  And it appears the bulb of QV, below, has gotten mottled in her several years communion with the seas.  I trust the yellow color is a metal coating . . .

Portside frontal profiles, including the “balls” forward of the stack cluster, seem

quite the same also.

A close look at the bulb and loadlines shows that, for whatever the reason, QV  is about 40 centimeters

higher in the water than QE.  Notice the ice glazing on both.

With QE in the background, here is one of the four props of one of the vessels that has come up in a lot of conversations about the Queens, the mothballed SS United States, which used to deliver 240,000 hp to its wheels.

Bunkering QV here is Harley’s St Andrews, I believe.  While we’re talking about saints, here are two more names relating to these vesels:  Saint Nazaire and Marghera.

Thursday after noon up to an hour before QM2 started to move upriver in search of her calves, this unidentified Vane boat was bunkering her in Red Hook.  Anyone know which Vane tug stands by here with the bunker barge?

Here’s another shot of the Brooklyn passenger terminal, showing (from left to right) Mary Whalen, a Watertaxi vessel, and an unidentified Reinauer tug and barge unit (anyone know which?) directly in front of the Vane boat and QM2.

By the way, can anyone help me out with the name of the green-gabled skyscraper in the right portion of the background?

Two hours later, here’s a shot of (far to near) QM2 and QV, showing their stepped stern decks.  Some numbers:  3056–1253, 2250–1253, and 2092–992.  These numbers are maximum passenger capacity to crew size 0n QM2, QV, and QE, respectively.  If you want the best passenger-to-crew ratio, it appears, then take QV.

In contrast to the two slightly older Queens, QE has a fuller, boxier stern . . .  hence, the slightly larger passenger capacity on QE relative to QV, which both came into existence in Marghera, a “suburb” of Venice.  QM2 was constructed in Saint Nazaire, on the  west coast of France.

Finally, that first set of names (Olsen, McNaught, and Wells), these are the Masters of the three Queens.  Inger Klein Olsen is from the Faroe Islands and Cunard’s first female captain.  McNaught is from Glasgow and son of a marine engineer.  Wells worked on Shell tankers and became second officer on QE2 before becoming master of QM2.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Fundraiser TONIGHT Dec 1, 2010 for the tug Pegasus!!  It’s unfortunate that I have to work elsewhere tonight.

A short post today . . .  it’s December and just to call it windy out is an understatement along the lines of saying that in winter the sixth boro is less hot than in June, that sex is just exercise, and that this video is a fenderbender.

Oh, well . . .  enjoy these fotos: Specialist II slings a string (strings along a sling?) of rock scows into the confluence of the East (so-called) River and the Hudson.  That’s

Red Hook container port in the background, with the nose of Mary Whalen protruding from behind the blue warehouse.

And here’s a catch-up from my Philly posts of last week:  when Captain Dann towed the Lockwood 2002 barge south-bound the cargo looked

all boxed up like this.  Maybe something headed south or east for Sinterklaas?

Nah.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Thanks to Carolina Salguero of PortSide NewYork for calling that video to my attention.

And since I’m linking to videos today, see this one, a music video that uses the Witte scrapyard as backdrop.  I really like the music, but I think the ship remains in the Arthur Kill location should be the main event, NOT the backdrop.

To see last year’s post from August 30, click here.   For info on the race next Sunday, click here.  If you scroll through that previous link, way down in the fine print you’ll read that this year’s race is dedicated to the memory of Don Sutherland.  Below is a short video I made at a memorial to Don held in June 2010 aboard PortSide NewYork’s Mary Whalen.

This post is dedicated to those folks who . . . on Labor Day . . . can’t make the tug race or even the family BBQ because they will labor in the house,

on the bridge,

on deck,

following the border,

in the service,

pushing oil around, or

trying to clean it up.

Happy Labor Day.

Because of last night’s rain, you have one last chance to see “Seven Deadly Seas” TONIGHT at 8 pm.  Go early and catch this hard-to-replicate combination:  left to right Cape Race, Gazela, and Mary A. Whalen … as seen from the entrance to the Brooklyn Passenger Terminal in Red Hook.

Big doings also are happening for Pegasus, here with a happy tour group.  Pegasus and Lehigh Valley 79 will be docked in Brooklyn Bridge Park starting later this week.

Uh . . . shoes of future mariners?

Contemporary mariners work aboard such vessels as

JoAnne Reinauer III

and (right to left) Twin Tube– a supply boat–and CSL Atlas, cousin of my longlost Alice O.  By the way, Atlas brought in the beginnings of the upcoming winter’s supply of road salt .  . or was that table salt??

Colleen McAllister and other vessels labor away at the sisyphusian task of dredging.

R/V vessels like Blue Sea do their own research/education work.  Here RV Blue Sea is on the high and dry as a preparation for a new season.

Jay Michael frequents the sixth boro, and

in parting, this sloop (Margaret A ?)  passes a fuel barge.

Unfortunately, I missed yesterday’s lobsterboat races up in Portland, Maine, and I have to wait til 2011 to see them.  But you can still get to the 18th Annual Great North River (aka sixth boro) Tugboat Race on September 5.  See you there.

Tomorrow … yes … another few days’ gallivant.  Details later.

All fotos here by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated:  Check out this Newtown Creek shipping post by Restless.

Ooooolala!  What’s this?  Make your way to Atlantic Basin ASAP;  click here for tickets … only two shows Saturday (tonight!)  and two Sunday left, before the floating burlesque sails over the horizon.

Staging this burlesque is barquentine Gazela, whose first life fishing for cod continued until the year Armstrong stepped onto the moon.  Yessir, this fine vessel served as a dory boat until 1969!

Up to 35 dories (many built in the Merrimack Valley north of Cape Ann)  like the one in the foreground here served “mothership” Gazela.

Daytime tours of Gazela as well as nighttime entertainment can be had only through this weekend!  This is also the last chance (for a while) to see Mary Whalen at Pier 11.  For directions to Pier 11, click here.

So I went to the show “The Seven Deadly Seas” the other night.  Before the show, the devil’s advocate (of the Flaming Cherries) emerges from the nether portions of the ship, and

the city darkens as the band begins to play.  See the twinkling Manhattan lights off in the distance.

Feisty bawds dueling over everything

can be charmed only by

dancing

and more dancing and

still more dancing that sometimes lead to …  lost clothing.

Come learn the story of Calico Jack, who imagined he had all the skills needed to thrive on Wall Street.

Bring a dozen friends and make it the most memorable night of the summer, the summer of Atlantic Basin as prime offshore Broadway.

Will Calico Jack swing here, or is it Camp Butner FCC for him?

Don’t miss the boat.

Fotos by Eric Lorgus (some taken in Philadephia)  and Will Van Dorp.

home of the two Marys.  The farther Mary comes and goes, but the nearer one–Mary A. Whalen, hub of the Basin–will

serve as locus for (literally) tons of visiting historical vessels (See Atlantic Basin 1)  this summer as well as intangible amounts

of fun.  See the full calendar of music, movies, lectures, and visiting vessels on the calendar here.  Or just come by to hang . . . during TankerTime.  When I tried to interview Mary A. Whalen about the summer, her only response was the smile created by red-white-blue bunting hanging between the portholes on the house.

As to the other Mary, the distant one with a tiara suggested by her name, she’s itinerant.  She left yesterday (7/19) and will return

in early August . . . if the schedule is to be believed.

Hail!   Marys of the Atlantic Basin.  See bowsprite’s adorable rendering here.

This coming Saturday–July 24–is City of Water Day in NYC.  Some of the events at Atlantic Basin include a marine security display with a VACIS container scanner, a sniffer dog from US Customs and Border Protection, Urban Divers mobile marine museum, a container mover from American Stevedoring, tours of visiting steam lighthouse tender Lilac, live music, food from local Brooklyn vendors including Kevin’s Restaurant and  Kustard King.  And more!

See more City of Water Day info here.

Middle three fotos by Will Van Dorp;  all other fotos and mosaic here by Carolina Salguero.

Unrelated:  Earlier today I asked the following question:  Can anyone help identify this large floating object on the Hudson here?  Foto was taken by the Mighty Quinn five days after the Willis Avenue Bridge floated by, and a few weeks after the house barge sauntered through.       And the answer . . . just in from Richard Canty, captain of Glen Cove:  The object in question is a set of “cooling towers for the new power plant being built in Astoria at Steinway Street.  They were  built at P&M Marine’s dock in Coeymans, NY. That dock may be remembered by some as the old Brickyard.  The towers are giant sails. Very exciting driving in a wind….. any wind.”

Thanks, Richard.

And this will be my last post for July.  Lake Opeongo has called.  It seems some mysteries there need my immediate attention–or I need theirs . . .  stuff like deciphering the code of crickets, the flickering of fireflies, the meandering of muskellunge, the wiles of wintergreen, the secrets of snipe, the contours of congress (lower case), the rituals of relating, the protocol of pursuit, the finesse of friendship   (oh.. this could be endless)  . . . .  Ah, the glories of gallivanting.

Til August . . . cheers from tugster.

Oops!  Here’s some merry music from Tina Turner, Jimi Hendrix, and Tom Petty.

(Back in New York)  You’ve seen this before here.  No, it’s not named for a boat competition, as someone suggested to me yesterday.  The paint is spiffied up, but

imagine my surprise and delight when

Cape Race glided into Atlantic Basin yesterday under

her own power, accompanied by music from her own Cat 3512.

Ah joy!  Eggs hatch (or make delicious souffles), apples ripen, oysters open, bread rises, and projects evolve.  Click here and here for festivities in Atlantic Basin last year, and come

check out this calendar of July events planned there this month and next, including Underwater New York (Check out their “An Oral history of Atlantis“)  and a movie about Poppa Neutrino.

First five fotos by Will Van Dorp.  Composite by Carolina Salguero.  By the way, if you do Facebook, you could befriend Mary Whalen, the 613-ton ambassador (See post for 2/20/2008).

Tangentially related and from the other side of the continent, check out these blog posts (thanks to Tom Larkin)  on

Log broncs (a variation on truckable tugs)

Seattle’s Tug race

A collage of wooden boats and other delights.

BlueBQ?  Why blue?

“Blue moon?” I wondered.   “Blue eyes, blueberries, or blue chips . . . ?”

No, it’s blue space, the “watery parts” needing consideration in urban planning . . . like green space . . . only aquaeous. The sixth boro is blue space.

BlueBQ:  It’s PortSide NewYork’s fundraiser held on July 3, 2010 on Pier 11 Atlantic Basin.  See all details here.

All fotos (taken in 2007 and 2008) by Will Van Dorp.  If you do Facebook, check out Mary Whalen‘s page here . . . with lots of fotos, including ones from their event last weekend:  Concierto Tipico.

Unrelated:  Check out the current state on this tugboat,  launched as ST 246 from the Levington Shipyard in Orange, TX, in 1943 . . . after surviving WW2 and morphing through French, Italian, and Turkish hands.  ST means “small tug.”Be sure to click on the “gallery,” and enjoy beautiful music even if the images are a bit repetitive.

Uh . . . outboard up?  Just an illusion.  And official uniform?  uh . . . just a hot-day display.   This one’s small enough to be trucked, yet it

can move a sizeable barge.  No name was visible anywhere as it passed through the KVK Thursday.  In the background is (I think) St. Andrews, leaning on the landing at Snug Harbor.  That’s the salt dock to the left.

This incognito truckable tug herded up a smattering of scows over at Bergen Point, on the western Bayonne side of the Bayonne Bridge.  Remember, most fotos enlarge when you doubleclick on them; I notice raised letters “reliant” on the back of the house just above the two hanging lengths of line.  Reliant?

Any guesses on the size of the red tug headed to the southwest across the Upper Bay?  I’ll give dimensions a little farther.  For now, that’s the Red Hook Container Terminal in the background with Mary Whalen (red house) docked along the pier with the blue warehouse.

It’s Louise, first time for me to spot.  Louise came off the Oyster Bay Jakobson ways in 1959:  34′ loa x 11.’

Compared with Rae (green) built 1952 and 46′ x 15′ x 5,’  the farther half of this tandem, Robert IV is newer and larger:  built in 1975 and 54′ x 22′ x 9.’

With their low bows and push knees, these are  river and harbor tugs.

It’s Glen Cove with a “side tug” or “outrigger tug.”  Don’t quote me on those terms;  I just made them up.  I took this foto the day the fleet arrived; all the folk outside the house had something of a water platform to see and salute the fleet.

On Glen Cove‘s starboard hip, it’s Harbor II, which first appeared here.  For one of Glen Cove‘s previous appearances, click here;  use the search window on upper left to find the others.  Dimensions:  Glen Cove is the largest (actually not small at all) in this post:  71′ x 28′ x 11′ launched in 1975 and having previously starred as Mary Gellatly, Philadelphia and Capt Danny.

Last one for now, it’s Maria J (ex-Jesus Saves built 1971 and 63′ x 22′ x 9′) . . .  I know I’ve told you that before, but I just love that name as I do its former New England registry.

All these smaller tugs has traversed the sixth boro in the past month;  all fotos .  . . Will Van Dorp.

Motivation for small tugs?  Some call them “rule-beaters.”

What Bonnie does here for Flatbush, I’ll attempt within the sixth boro, starting here with the venerable Mary Whalen and

King Dorian (glad that’s not “durian“) before shifting to shorter wavelength in

Jo Selje and

Panagia Lady, here lightering onto (I think) JoAnne Reinauer III.

Continuing across the spectrum with Stolt Vanguard and sibling

Perseverence.  Then

and Ever Refine and

the snarkiest Don Juan and

the Bermudian cargo shuttle Oleander and

Bro Albert.

For something my eyes register as indigo, violet, purple . . . I can’t guarantee you’ll agree . . .  I had to go outatown, like back upstate to Newark and a foto from last summer of Grouper. Has she now begun her journey west?

All fotos . . . so far … Will Van Dorp.

But from shipjohn via Shipspotting . . .  here’s that purple fleet down in Philly . . . like  Purple Hays,

Big Daddy, and

Grape Ape. Many thanks shipjohn.

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My job . . . Summer AND Fall 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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