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I took this foto in January 2008.  According to this site, Cosette–321′ loa, launched 1966– was seized in Martinique some time in 2010.

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She used to fill the niche currently occupied in the sixth boro by Grey Shark and Lygra, in the Narragansett Bay by Danalith, and who knows what vessels in any other port.   Anyhow, I was just wondering if anyone knows the current disposition of Cosette . . .

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Ditto  . . .  Sea Dart (II)?, here in a foto I took in October 2008 and never used.  Is she still around?  Is this the 1953 Higgins vessel owned by someone in Elizabeth, NJ?

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Here’s a pair I haven’t seen in a few years . . .  Realist

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and Specialist.  There was also a Specialist II for a while.  I recall stories about one of them going to the Great Lakes and another to Puerto Rico, but have no confirmation.   Just curious . . . not working for a collections group.

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Below is the boat that prompted this post . . . Edith Thornton back a few at the 2008 tugboat race . . . here’s another shot . . .  and

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same hardware now as Guyanese tug Chassidy.  Many thanks to Gerard Thornton for sending the foto below and starting the percolating process.  I have to mention here a novel that served as catalyst for this thought process:  The Adventures and Misadventures of Maqroll by Alvaro Mutis.  The book is part Joseph Conrad, part Gabriel Garcia Marquez . ..  with some Melville and Jensen thrown in as seasoning . . . and Maqroll el Gaviero–along with his “dispatcher/business partner” Abdul Bashur–are  aventureros sin igual!

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Here’s a different illustration of change . . . Pegasus a few years back and

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last weekend:  it’s springtime and she’s sprouted an upper wheelhouse

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Ambassador in March 2010 is now Pramuditaa very Buddhist name.  When Ambassador was here three years ago, she seemed to be under treatment for propulsion issues.

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Three years from now . . . or 30  . .  who knows what changes we’ll see . . .  All fotos–unless otherwise attributed–by Will Van Dorp.

10 was just over exactly a year ago, and my first “fog” post fotos were taken over six years ago here.    This autumn dawn brought fog and horns . . . horns that could be heard, with echoes, and felt.  Eukor Morning Conductor seemed asleep to shore folk

as Anna L. Miller motored by.

On the KVK, Gage Paul Thornton chugged to an appointment as Bow Summer , which I last saw in springtime Panama, made all lines fast.

Mary Alice towed more Kills bottom out to sea.

Finally, the loudest and deepest horn came into view.

attached to Americas Spirit, a name of a befogged yet moving vessel which I’ll avoid attributing too much symbolic meaning to.

Taurus passes Robbins Reef Light.

And Americas Spirit came closer.

She was so close to this shore observer that two of her crew could be clearly seen on the bridge wing.

Barbara McAllister spun her stern to put the tanker portside to at the dock.  More of these docking fotos tomorrow.

And Hunting Creek also made her way from Brooklynside to Bayonneside.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Actually that title captures 98% of this blog’s +1800 posts.  And just as elsewhere in Gotham or anywhere else, so on the sixth boro what work you see depends entirely on your station.  And my station this particular day was Tchefuncte River’s  Equitable Equipment‘s hull # 1428, delivered in August 1966 as Red Star Towing‘s New Haven.  Now she’s Freddie K. Miller;  I took the foto below just over five years ago when she was Stapleton Service.    I use this foto here because a downside of being on the tow is my inability to get a foto OF the tow.

At 0520 hrs, dawn was sweetest and coolest, from this point a mile south of Miller’s Launch.  When I reported at 0530, the Miller’s yard was already busy.

The crew of Freddie K Miller’s had a job: pick up Weeks Crane Barge 552 and its crew and proceed to the East River ConEd.  By 0615, crew was making the tow.

0645 we were crossing west to east across the Upper Bay.  Buchanan 1 was towing a scow  and

Douglas B. Gurion headed west for passengers.  The ferry is named for a victim of September 11.

0715 . ..  near Red Hook container port, we passed this ex-MSC vessel Transatlantic.  I will post more MSC soon.

0730 . . . we had passed under the Brooklyn Bridge and now could feast on this potpourri of  Manhattan skyline.  Side by side on the right are Gehry’s flowing-facade 8 Spruce (2011) and Gilbert’s spiky-tower (1913).

0745 . . . we pass GMD Shipyard, where morning shift has already started its work on Massachusetts Maritime’s TS Kennedy  (1967).

0815 . . . the crew have tied to the ConEd dock and Weeks’ crew has begun setting the spuds, for stability as the load is transferred.  My very general understanding of this load is that ConEd purchased equipment from  Manufacturer M.  Company A trucked it to the Weeks yard because installation by land (by Company B) was less feasible than installation from water.  Miller’s job was to move equipment on crane barge to ConEd so that Weeks–with collaboration from Company B–could set equipment exactly where it will be used.

0915 . . . first equipment is lifted and rotated over the East River counterclockwise to avoid obstacles on land, and at

0920 . . .  crew guides unit into exact location.  If half an inch off, then lift and get it right.

1010 . . . next piece of equipment is moved.   While the tug stands by with the crane barge, Miller crew does fine carpentry work in wheelhouse.

Since my self-appointed job is to record details, check out Carolina IV, sailing westbound on the East river . . . hailing from Stockholm,  Yes, sailing!  and  . . . yes . . . that Stockholm while

eastbound are Gage Paul Thornton and a floatplane.

1115 . . . heavy-duty pipe elbow gets lifted into place. Tower protruding from the building just right of MetLife is Chrysler Building.

1215 . . . the spuds are up,  the crane boom lowered and secured, Freddie K Miller has spun off the dock and now heads back westbound for the Weeks yard.  If the grayish vessel in the foreground is locally known as a “honey boat,” then this has to be one of the sweetest scenes possible in these parts.

1300 . . . as we approach the Weeks yard we cross Buchanan 12 towing three stone scows, possibly headed for a quarry up the Hudson.

1330 . . . Freddy K Miller is now “light,” having left the barge at the Weeks yard.  Ever Decent is outbound for sea, and by this writing is southbound off Cape Hatteras.

Meanwhile, close to Manhattan, Asphalt Star takes on bunker fuel from a Vane barge.  That black hose . . . that’s like the hose at the pump where you fill your car tank.

By 1400, I’ve said my thanks to the crew of Freddy K Miller —who await their next job on this or another vessel–and the dispatcher, and take a break to examine a familiar sight:  Alice, she who inspired my first ever blogpost!!

Back on the bank and before heading home, I get another shot;  she’s loaded deep with her Canadian aggregates.

Imagine my delight, then, later that day getting a foto from Mike C. of Alice Oldendorff north of the Navy Yard self-unloading her cargo of crushed stone.

Many thanks to all the folks at Miller’s Launch.  Also, thank you Mike for sending along this last foto.  All other fotos by Will Van Dorp.

8 was here.    In the foto below, note the name in raised metal.

Doubleclick enlarges, and then notice the same raised letters here.

Originally called John E. Matton,  built in 1958 near the confluence of the Erie Canal and the Hudson, the foto below [of Mischief] was taken in June 2010, and

the foto below of Thornton Bros was taken today, under the Bayonne Bridge, where

this foto was taken today as well . . . of the 1961  Caitlin Ann, as

was this foto in summer 2009 . ..  as Caribbean Sea.

This “colander” bow of  tanker Dispatch (ex-Texaco 147, Richmond, Nepco Dispatch) was taken in August 2011.  Dispatch was one of three identical ( I suppose) tankers built by Texas Steamship in Bath, Maine, in 1919.  Texaco 147 sank off Cape Ann in February 1957, and has therefore weathered underwater and differently.  Click here to see  a recent foto of Texaco 145 aka Chelsea.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  Thanks to Jeff Schurr for info on Dispatch.

As the sixth boro holds its tugboat race this weekend, Cape Ann has its schooner race.  Wish I could be in two places at once!  And speaking of the tugboat races, see who has really caught the illustration bug and might be another “sketchy” spectator!  Bravo!

Transitioning from the “farm tugs” post, enjoy Governor Roosevelt, sister of Governor Cleveland,  both came to the canal to  break ice and do other tasks in 1927 as steam tugs.   If you add the ages of Governor Roosevelt, Governor Cleveland, and Urger . . . you have almost three hundred years of boat work.   I found Roosevelt hauled out last weekend along the Erie Canal in Lyons.

Edna (1997) was hauled out for some work recently along

the KVK.

Here’s a first sighting:  Coney Island, built by

Blount in 1958.  Here’s George (a 2009 vessel with a simple name)  taken recently in Lake Charles, LA.

And (once again . . . might she be languishing?) Grouper, a year away from a century old.  This is how she looked last weekend, and I’d love to hear an update on efforts to bring her back to life, lest she become HMS (heavy melt steel).

George foto comes thanks to eastriver;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

Actually I’m creating the mystery, but I uncreate it after the fourth foto.  You might try to guess what’s happening.  I put in some lovely distractors.  What was happening on Coney Island this morning between 7 and 930 am?  Man with red shorts, a swimmer, and tug Edith Thornton (1951, ex-Signet Defender, J. K. McLean).

SUNY Maritime’s Empire State--all flags flying– returns from its three-month summer training cruise to the Mediterranean.

Man with red kite in the air;  black spot in between.

Man with green bathing cap wades in as a brace of jetskis bobs nearby.  So far, it’s all men with head gear, but

then Bowsprite approaches with camera;   yellow kayaks and NYPD as background.  She didn’t say, “We have you surrounded.”  This could mean only one thing:  click here and find out.  Here’s the site for CIBBOWS.

Swimmers in green caps (warming and limbering up)  did the 5 km race.

Long Island City Community Boathouse spotted, as did the jetskiers.

Cristian read the rules.

And the first wave went in, heading for the first

turn around the buoy.

The second wave (white caps) began their one-mile race to the Coney fishing pier and

back.

Bowsprite served as beach-spotter at the finish line, where here arrive the first finishers in green caps.  After

five kilometers in one hour and 18 minutes it was this close.

Now the man with the kite . . . that speck was a camera.  Click here and here to see Scott Dunn’s amazing photography with kite-suspended camera.

Empire State and Edith Thornton . . . their role was to bless the race with their beauty.

This was my first swim race;  I plan to attend the one in November.  About the Aquarium, it served as venue for registration and celebration;  as we prepared there for the race in the wee hours before sunrise, I overheard some flush pinnipeds wagering their fishy breakfast on race outcomes.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

And here’s another swimming organization to learn about:  Swim Across America.  Recall the 2009 swim post by tugster . .  . uh,  me?  And someone’s unconventional techniques?

1969 . . . a year for me of many firsts,  like finishing high school and going off to college and  . . . .  In events related to this blog, 1969 was the year of feats and firsts accomplished by the likes of Apollo 11,  Suhaili, a 747, a Concorde, another Airplane, and ARPANET.  A fire at Bannerman’s Castle destroyed much of the roof.  In December 1969, up at Matton Shipyard, James Turecamo first splashed.  Here’s early-morning 40-year-old  James westbound last week.

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This blog has featured fotos of James Turecamo in 10 posts since January 2008.  Use the search window to locate them.  Below, James (1700 hp) collaborates with Miriam Moran (3000 hp) to position Blue Jade at a dock along the Arthur Kill, giving

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a burst of power as needed.

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Deckhand on James’s bow coordinates with the color-coded crew aboard Blue Jade.

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Next time you see James Turecamo, think 1969.  And Andy will think 1969 this way.

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Other tugs seen in the sixth boro hailing from Matton include the following:  Jean Turecamo (1975) and Zachery Reinauer (1971).   Ditto Thornton Brothers (1958), whom I haven’t seen around at all in the past year.  Has Thornton Brothers gone off to Philadelphia?   Ah, the city of brotherly love . . . I was there this week myself.  Fotos soon.

All fotos here by Will Van Dorp.

Oh . . . some 1969 music, try this collaboration.

And thanks to Brian, tracking info on Flinterduin . . . sheesh . . .  this is starting to feel like a drawn-out Christmas Eve.

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Left to right:  Laura K Moran, new this year; Edith Thornton, 1951; and Pegasus, 1907.  Laura K didn’t race on Sunday but escorted in a cruise ship moments before.  Built in Maine, New Jersey, and New York, respectively.

Rosemary McAllister , 2008, raced, a stand-in for Andrew McAllister, also 2008, Florida.

And while we’re on McAllisters, this foto taken back in January shows McAllister Responder, 1967,  escorting Peking;  in the foreground in Helen McAllister, 1900,  recently disappeared from South Street Seaport.  Built in Florida and New York.  Hope Helen comes back a tractor.

So through the magic of blogging, let’s turn time back and shift camera position, kind of like the movie Groundhog Day.  Or “TR 2008  . . . Take 2.”  The crew of W. O. Decker–the only tug in the harbor taking paying passengers–coordinate to rope a bollard.  By the way, W. O. took first place in best mascot . . . and guesses what it was?  Answer follows.

Truth must out . . . these fabuous fotos were captured by Brian, also intrepid captain of Puffin.  Below, Charles Oxman pushes around Rosemary . . . until Rosemary turns on all her 6000 hp.  The Oxman takes my first prize for the most unusual house design AND best namesake.  Bravo Vinik!

Brian gets a prize for catching the drama of nose-to-nose gladiating (I’m sure that’s not a word til now) with Edith Thornton, who saved all its grit for this, twisting it up with St. Andrew.

Best-looking tug in the harbor . . . Matthew Tibbetts.  Anyone know its namesake?

And one more shot for today of “sturm und drang” as portrayed by speed winners, Ross Sea and Maryland.

Oh . . . about the best mascot:  beating out a disqualified tattoo queen, a ferret, a large dog and a puppy, and some very happy clams . . . winner was an East River spider crab.  Does it have a name?  A special snack for winning?  Check back later.

Daily News reports the news here, even dragging in some Yankees-RedSox causality.

OK . .  last addition for today, thanks to Bernie of the Working Harbor Committee, someone who loves spinach . . . although I still suspect it’s seaweed.  Either way, he’s gonna grow up strong.

Thornton Bros and Edith Thornton, the latter possibly not named for the actress, take a weekend break along the KVK. That’s Shooter’s Island and Port Elizabeth in the background.

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Edith is the ex-Tamaqua, built in 1951 in Camden for the Reading Railroad. I never noticed until now how much the Marine Steel white-diamond logo resembles the old Reading Railroad logo. Tamaqua is a Pennsylvania coal region town.

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The above foto is related to the Thorntons only in the color, green. Would you believe a barge full of emeralds transported to the gem district? No? Actually, this is a pile of broken recycled bottles used for . . .

sandblasting. Read the references in Props 1 and 2 to “green” material at the bottom of the dry dock holding Orion; yes, this is the sand. Glass is made from sand, right? April is environmental consciousness-raising month. This just makes sense.

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My job . . . Summer AND Fall 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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