You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Long Island’ category.

Here are tugster-takes on car-carrying ferries off North Carolina, on Champlain, and in the tropics.

And this is likely a Forks ferry entering the Upper Bay in the fog a few years back, almost invisible.  Long Island has a plethora of ferry companies.

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It seems from Shelter Island north you take a ferry of one company, like Menantic here or Manhasset or another, which I conclude is built way south, and

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from Shelter Island south you take a ferry like Sunrise built farther north.    I need to get back to the Forks of Long Island to find out more.

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Since Islander seems a fairly generic name for ferries, I’ve yet to find any specifics of this one, on the hard in Greenport.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who has failed to find a complete listing of Forks ferries on the internet.

By the way, I itching to gallivant soon . . . inland to Nola, then up the Mississippi to Vicksburg to  . . . St Louis and then zigzag back to the east coast, provided that storms stay elsewhere.

I took this foto in August 2010, here with my back to Anthony’s Nose.  Any guesses about the vintage of this chubby people mover?

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Here’s a foto I took yesterday in Greenport of

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this Morehead, NC veteran of WW1!!!

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At the same locstion, I took this foto.  Anyone know what manufacturer this beauty is, frontal and

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stern view.

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And from inside the post-Sandy rebuilt Scrimshaw restaurant, I’d love to know what vessel

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this figurehead once graced.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Day 24, midmorning  . . . fog reduced visibility to half mile or less along the beach and tower, and given my dose of Christian upbringing, I hoped I would tell a resurrection story, but alas, as I got close,

Le Papillon still rode the swells of sand,

piloted by wishful thinkers.

Moving on beach billows gets one nowhere, and I prepared to head off the beach, until I noticed

beyond the crowd, an unusual visitor, who

inspected the starboard hull,  moving and then lying a long period,

ear to the ground, seeming to divine–or attempt to–

the fate of the schooner.

It ambled around the stranded ocean voyager, conjecturing and

contemplating and

cajoling it to

follow it seaward.  All my ears could tell was that seal encouragement was ignored by the schooner just as much as human encouragement was convincing this seal to return to the water.

More seriously, the seal is believed to be a juvenile male gray seal, about four months old, healthy though tired, which would–if left unmolested–return to its watery realm.

Yes, I took these fotos with a zoom and avoided interfering with a marine mammal.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp on Easter, 2011.  Click here to see how saltaire38 ties this seal to a Fire Island tradition.

It’s 1430 hours, April 17.  Day 17 of Papillon‘s misery.   Click here on Saltaire38′s blog for fotos a few hours earlier . . . at high tide, showing Le Papillon awash.   Here was Day 10.  After yesterday’s blow with gusts over 25 mph, I was curious.   So was that mallard, not to inject a canard into this story already rife with them.  The most striking change is that

she’s now oriented roughly southward, even somewhat south south west, compared with eastward since I first saw her.  Yes, that’s a car in the distance, and low-level sand blowing across the beach.

Furthermore, she’s been sucked down, but surrounded stern to

bow along her both sides with

 a fairly deep lagoon.

Thousands of fotos will linger for years, no matter whether she

gets an assisted departure or

a shifting sands burial.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

I’m reminded of this wreck from Tierra del Fuego and southbound650.

Unrelated:  since this is the actual tax day, enjoy (or suffer)  biankablog’s “accountancy shanty.”

See November gusts here.  Today on the Upper Bay gusts were in excess of 25 mph.

Spray crashes over the bulwarks although to my untrained eye, Quantico Creek rides smooth, as

does Elk River, a short time later.

Pilot boats like Yankee are designed to ride in all weather.

Ellen Bouchard pushes B. No. 284 through quite effortlessly.

Kate Maersk holds tight.

But this outboard motorboat needed more care in negotiating wakes and swells.

Yet, here’s a similar size boat–a 26′ Grover–that crossed the Atlantic.  See video here and a background article here.

Some basic statistics:  route was from St. Pierre to Portugal, 26 days at sea, 615 gallons of fuel resulting in only 10″ freeboard upon departure, and an encounter with Hurricane Claudette.    You can see her in Freeport, NY.  See 10 minutes of fotos of a Grover restoration project here.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

See doryman for more small boats.  I ran some small boat posts here and here back in January.

Fishing vessel Sharon Ann is not coming ashore, nor is

she–as I’d hoped while approaching Le Papillon–here as offshore muscle to drag her off.

Hatches are sealed, but

here, on Day 10,

she remains, sanded in.

I wish I had better news.  Fotos by Will Van Dorp on April 10 midmorning.

 

I’d hoped to see movement today, but no news.  Just

weather.  Fotos taken at 9 a.m. Tuesday, Day 5

Hightide’s fury pounded it so hard that it did move, but like a horse with a broken leg

trying to stand.

I kept my distance, but I wondered about the size of openings where water geysers out here midships.

It’s a tough ship, but it reminds me of Gallopin’ Gertie.

Fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Fotos from a few days ago, here.

Launched a month before the big stock market crash,  drafted into submarine hunting duty during World War 2, and here three years back sailing past the sugar dome no more in Red Hook, it’s Shearwater, a product–like some of the new Moran tugs–of Boothbay, Maine.

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Below, she exits the northern end of Arthur Kill, after no doubt returning from post-New York sailing  season maintenance.  Unlike Lettie G. Howard, also a New England-built schooner, Shearwater was never a fish boat.  Oyster Bay of the Gatsby-era was her first port, and any oysters aboard were harvested by another vessel.  I’m told there’s a spiral staircase leading below.  I must make a point to sail aboard her next season.

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Anyone know where she winters this year?  Anyone have fotos of Shearwater as a gray-painted sub chaser?

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

It took a few months before I could identify this tug, which I’d seen in Kingston last spring.  No one was talking maybe.

When I saw the vessel again in Waterford, it bore a name:

But why . . . Nor did I know that it had arrived upriver via anything but its own propulsion.  The prominent broom in foto is a distractor.

It’s time to play . . . Samhain!  See neversealand‘s play here.

Sorry . . . the hallowdayeen spirit intruded.  All fotos that follow come via Harold, whose foto collection and expertise are immense.  Spooky traveled to the Roundup on the hip of . . .

Gowanus Bay, whose previous shots here can be seen using the search window upper left.

Before acquiring a patina of fright by lurking in the waters of Amityville (Long Island), the spooky one had been just plain Josie, pushing sand by means of her own propulsion.

Enjoy the weekend;  I’m off haunting the river of my my forebears.  See a halfmoonthly installment here later Friday.  More on that next week.

Sometimes I find I just misunderstood–and forget– stuff.  Like the story of Benjamin Elliot and Margot.  Margot is at the half century mark and Benjamin Elliot will be there in two years.  And they work as a major portion of New York State Marine Highway.

Margot came off the ways at Jakobson’s in Oyster Bay, NY, and Benjamin Elliot, Gladding Hearn.  Contrast Margot’s wheelhouse in the foto below with the one at the NYS link here.

I took the two fotos below in 2006.  Last weekend I spoke with a crewman of Margot, who corrected my erroneous assumption that these were semi-retired boats.  No way . . . on the most recent voyage, Margot traveled from Norfolk, VA to Duluth, MN, over 1500 miles away!    And after the Roundup, she would run a similar load to coastal Ohio.   Oh, what I forgot was my foto here of Margot following the highway through the sixth boro last winter.

I’d be happy to post either of these NYS Marine Highway vessels in any distant ports.  If you have one, pass it along.

Benjamin Elliot is ex-El Jean.  Margot is ex-Hustler II, ex-Jolene Rose, and ex-Margot Moran.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

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Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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