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Name that tug?  Answer follows.

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Kodiak . . . this is a new one for me and a one-off trip for the vessel?

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The tug here is

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Liberty Service.  And yes, that’s Chesapeake Coast in the distance.

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McKinley Sea leads Bluefin in from the anchorage.  I’m not sure why Bluefin is still gray.

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This is an impressive lineup in the late fall afternoon light:  the McAllisters Kate, Bruce, Helen, Brothers, Brian .  . and more.

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This vessel I truly don’t know.  It’s new in the harbor, and I have a hunch . . . but will keep that to myself.

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And the mystery tug at the start of this post was none other than W. O. Decker.  Here’s one of my favorite set of old photos of Decker.  Here are many others.

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All photos very recently by Will Van dorp.

Despite the distance and the fog covering the escutcheon,  I could immediately identify this tug–once a regular on the Hudson and in the sixth boro– on the Mississippi.

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Let me end out this series with tugboats and other vessels:  Sydney Ann

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and Brandi,

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Mary Parker and

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Port Ship Service Little Ray

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David J. Cooper and

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Bulk Guatemala with selfie-shooting watch stander,

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Sonny Ivey and

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Connie Z,

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Moose, 

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Jena Marie C, 

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Capt CJ, and

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fireboat Gen. Roy S. Kelley,

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Jo Provel with the 9th steamboat named Natchez.

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Now all of this has nothing to do with the photo below, which nevertheless deserves recognition . . . interactive art which really seems to have caught on.  Thanks, Candy Chang.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s even now in the cold NYC air plotting a return to

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Nola.

I wonder . . . if I move here, will I tire of watching the traffic pass?   Sometimes there are familiar vessels . . . like Buster Bouchard, but otherwise . . .

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commerce rafts in vessels never before seen . . . like Fu Kang (almost a racy name?) foreground and Caribe Pearl protruding from around the bend, with  Angus R. Cooper, Bollinger, and Algiers Point in between.

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Leopard Sea and Miss Sylvia keep the excitement going, with

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handoffs to Karen Koby,

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Cindy R and Zante,

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C. Mack Zito, 

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Jesus Saves,

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Presager,

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J. K. McLean, 

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Alice I. Hooker, 

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Merrick Jones, 

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Louisiana and Angus R. Cooper meeting Qingdao Tower.

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The Mississippi never stops, but I will of now, with a note of familiarity, not Dolphin per se–she’s never been pictured on the is blog, I think–but rather the Kirby livery.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Back to Jesus Saves, is there any truth to the story that somewhere along the Mississippi a nun is master of a tug?

Know the location?

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I took it from a southernmost point in the Bronx looking eastward toward North Brother Island . . . the brick chimney to the right.  I can’t identify either the Weeks tug or the current usage of the red-and-white striped stack to the left.

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What caught my attention was the pink breast cancer awareness ribbon on the front of the house of Mediterranean Sea.

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By the time I got back to the sixth boro, the pink “M” on Moran tugs was once again white.  The only photo of a Moran tug I managed in the whole month of October was the one below, a photo of a photo of a Catherine Moran in the lobby of a restaurant in Lockport.  Label says . . . as you can read it . . . “Lockport 1939.”  Would this have been the vessel built by Neafie & Levy in 1904?

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As to the pink ribbon, I was happy to see it.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

The difference between “really random” and just “random” is that with the former, I include photos taken in different waterways and ports.  Guess the ports/waterways here?

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All these photos have been taken during the past 30 days by Will Van Dorp, who needed to do a random __ tugs post to dispel notions that this blog has succumbed to focus creep.  Soon, maybe tomorrow, I’ll return to my zoning of the canal.  I’ll also return to some background vessels in this post.

Oh . .  the first four photos were taken near the Delaware River in Philly, the next two were in the KVK, the following was the Hudson river across from the mouth of the Rondout and the now-derelict Delaware & Hudson Canal, and the last one was between locks 7 and 6 in the Erie Canal.  I included the KVK pics to show that although I’m mostly gallivanting these days, mu roots still remain emplaned in the sixth boro.

But first . . . it’s a race, and there are trophies for such categories as best-looking, best mascot, best tattooed crew person . . .  .  And there is pushing and jostling, for which there are no trophies.  But what would you call this?

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Step back a hundred and some feet . . . and clearly it’s USAV MGen Anthony Wayne LT-803, 5100 hp, and delivered from what is now  VT Halter Marine in June 1993.  Off her port side is Eric R. Thornton.

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From l to r, lining up are Meagan Ann, Houma, Bering Sea, a little of Robert E. McAllister, Buchanan 1, Mister T, and Emily Ann.  

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Here’s a view of Robert E.’s business end under way.

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Mako III seemed to carry a different name last year.   It began life as an Army ST, although I don’t know what number she carried.  66, perhaps?

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And they were off.  Fells Point, the nearest vessel, is likely the newest boat in the race.

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More photos later.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is grateful to NYMedia Boat and Bjoern Kils for getting the best positions for photography during the sixth boro’s premiere Labor Day event, the 22nd annual Great North River Race organized by the Working Harbor Committee, who also deserve a big round of applause.

Two questions you might have are . .  why does the Army have boats, and who was MGen Anthony Wayne?  Here are links A and B to answer the first part–please add detail if you know it–and here’s the info on General Wayne, sometimes called “mad General Wayne.”

Dorothy J was once known as Angela M

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and first appeared here about four years ago.

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Mediterranean Sea working and

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being worked upon.  There’s no significance to the blue bicycle in foreground lower left, but I like that it’s there.

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Peggy Winslow is a boat I’ve not seen in a long time, unidentified here but identified in the next one here, in town last week with Mrs W.

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Mrs W has some sort of shaft on board.

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It’s a Hebert boat . . . Larry J?, and Bering Dawn dredging in the Arthur Kill.

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Now known as Caitlin Ann, this 1961 tug first appeared here (scroll) in 2008 as Vivian L Roehrig.

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And if that’s Oleander, it must be Thursday.

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Most photos taken fairly recently by Will Van Dorp, who is amazed by changes in ownership in the sixth boro.

And unrelated, check out George Conk’s post here about a vessel with an unusual name and even more unusual purpose.

 

Bergen Point, a 1958 Blount product,  coming through the Narrows last weekend.  Click here for many interesting vessels from Blount that have appeared on this blog.

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And a first timer on this blog . . . John Parrish.

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Penn No. 4 all painted white . . . click here and scroll through to see her in PennMaritime gray.

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Bluefin . .  still in PennMaritime gray . . . or is that primer?

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Maryland . . . with reflections.

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If my search window serves me right, then this is the first appearance of Katie G. McAllister on this blog.

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This is definitely the first appearance of Pelican State here.  The photo of this Great Lakes Dredge & Dock boat is here thanks to Mike and Michele Mcmorrow.

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And thanks to Mage, here’s Esti and

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Cerro Jefe.

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A previous view here  of Emily Ann had her as Solomon Sea.

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Brian Nicholas at work in Great Kills.  Click here (scroll through) to see her as both Banda Sea and Brian Nicholas.

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And finally . . . it’s the mystery tug Elbe when it was Maryland Pilot boat Maryland.  At its stern is its predecessor, Baltimore.  I haven’t found out much about Baltimore.  Any help?  About Maryland, Capt. Brian Hope–who shared this photo, said this, “In 1985 and MARYLAND was donated to Greenpeace.  She was a great boat, but too expensive to operate. She had a crew of 18, plus a chief steward.  The crew worked two weeks on and two weeks off, so that, counting the steward, we had a total of 37 crew.   When we went ashore that was reduced to about 21 and our fuel, repair and food costs dropped dramatically as well.   I am very glad to see that she has been preserved (in Maassluis).  She’s a great boat!”  Thanks to a generous reader, here’s an article about her sea trials.

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When next I post, I hope to share photos Elbe in her restored glory.

Sorry to miss NYC’s fleet week again.

Here’s the first in this series.   David sent me some photos earlier this week and offered to write the commentary as well.  Hence the quotation marks.

Marie J. Turecamo steam harmlessly through the harbor.”

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James Turecamo makes a splash as she heads towards the Kill.”

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Lincoln Sea sits patiently in the notch of the DBL 140.”

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“Two displays of heritage in the form of New York State Marine Highway tug Margot and Ellis Island.”

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Herbert P. Brake pushes a scrap barge (possible future additions to her hull?) through the harbor.”

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Crystal Cutler pushes the Patricia Poling as Andrew Barbieri bears down upon her.”

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My take:  if a waterborne Rip van Winkle had fallen asleep 80 years ago and awakened today, the bridge and the light might be among the very few structures he would recognize.

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Stephen Reinauer steams lite through the harbor towards her next assignment.”

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“Ever ready, ever vigilant.”  

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Thanks, David.    The sixth boor’s the star here, IMHO.  To post some corny doggerel in Poetry Month “collaboration is the game and “sixth boro” the star’s name!

 

Mako . .  .  in early April, and

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a day or so later.

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I’ll be keeping my eyes open to see the beautiful color-combo on those stacks transitioned away.

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Thanks to “secret salt” for shots of the painting in progress.

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