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Here was my post two years ago, and here are some photos I took on and around the first CoWD.     Peter Stanford, several decades back, organized an annual Sea Day, which I think is a better name.  Squint your eyes looking at the photo below and you almost imagine a planet of water.   Almost, right?

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I’m happy that summer and winter brings sightseers onto the water using these vessels.

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Squint again and from this perspective the boro of Manhattan looks a bit like the bow of a vessel, WTC1 being the stem post.  Fireboat Harvey and the rowboat are much near New Jersey, though, than the city of NYC.

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It’s the city of Hoboken water day?

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It’s actually the sixth boro water day . . . with land activities on boros, islands, and cities in a neighboring state.   Below, it’s Village Community Boathouse rowers past Pier A.

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Meanwhile, in the midst of it all, work goes on along the front of the inimitable Manhattan skyline, Sassafras here with DoubleSkin 39.

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And here as the day starts, the iconic Pegasus  . . . and crew  . . . reporting for duty, getting those who signed up for free tours on

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the primordial boro.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who leaves with his red passport tomorrow for the north country.  Posting will happen when possible.

 

Click here to see why John J. Harvey made this trip to Caddells.  These photos were taken around midday today, as the .org retired fireboat made its way to its home dock.  With new metal covered with absolutely brightest red, nothing but the most brilliant April sunlight would do.  Enjoy these photos!

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The trim is not yet finished but there’s some time before her first trip upriver to kick off the season.   Note the sternway wake.

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I thought I could jump in my land conveyance and beat them to one of my “offices” along the Kill, but I had to race . . .

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to catch them here.

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Yup . . . pass the plate.

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Here’s a photo I took September 1, 2013 as Harvey knifed its way between fast-moving boats in last year’s tugboat race.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s putting this Monday morning post up early.

 

. . . well, only one day of it, and she’s been around for over 30,000 days.  These fotos, shared by Al Trojanowicz, were likely taken on July 4, 2000.  This date should be easy enough to verify, given the sailing vessel along the left side of the foto . . . Wavertree with sail bent on.  Anyone know the tug escorting her?

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Bertha . . . tied alongside Harvey!   I’d first thought this was  near Chelsea Piers, but I’ve been corrected . . . it’s at the old fireboat house, Marine Co. 6, at the foot of Grand Street in Manhattan just south of the Williamsburg Bridge.  Thanks for the correction, Al.   Here’s a link to the fireboat locations in the 1960s.  And here are some great vintage fireboat fotos and info.

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Bertha underway . . . with a hint of Wavertree on the far side of the NY Waterways vessel.

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Might the tug in the distance be Pegasus?

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And given the date, the Domino plant just beyond the Williamsburg Bridge might still have been in operation.

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I hope to share more of Bertha‘s past, but the indiegogo fund raiser is critical for getting Bertha back into the water and sailing into the future.  Click on the “save Bertha” link upper left.

Many thanks to Al Trojanowicz for sharing these fotos.

The race may last for less than 10 minutes for (most) boats, but each participant spends hours before and after.  Here, using the power of thousands of conceptual horses and one very real donkey, all four vessels in Miller contingent make their way upriver.

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At Pier 66, crew on deck and crew below start them up.

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Lady B (read her interesting history here and here, the latter explaining that the “B” stands for either “Benazir” or Bhutto.”

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For boats that arrive on the scene early, Red Hook may have come straight from a job delivering bunker to Norwegian Breakaway, there’s time for what might look like lollygagging, and

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(in these next two shots from William Hyman) saluting the spectators or just

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being seen.  Does Seagus have another name?

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But it’s also getting acquainted time.

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Some regulars didn’t show, and other vessels arrived that I’d never seen before.

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I had to look up South River Rescue Squad attending the Great North River race . . .

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Somewhere in the attractively dressed race day crew on Jake-boat Resolute are two of the principals of tugboatinformation.com . . .  hi Birk and Craig, as well as the force majeure aka Rod behind Narragansett Bay Shipping.

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This kayaker stays well out of the stream.

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The white bowstriped vessel–Lt. Michael P. Murphy– in the distance won the prize for persistence, finishing the course in a historic half an hour . . . spending most of that time doing a mid-race-course onboard repair.

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Despite forecasts of storms–and rain north of the GW Bridge–the only lightning I saw was here and

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thunder from the crowds on the piers.  That’s the intrepid bowsprite showing us her drawing/painting arm.

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Spectators took advantage of any platform.

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More soon.   Thanks to William Hyman for his fotos, especially the one of an exuberant W. O. Decker, which I featured hard at work using Seth Tane fotos from over 30 years ago here.  Click here for John Huntington’s superb fotos from a wet place in the race . . ..

Again, my hat’s off to all who must work on Labor Day, including my son, who always works holidays for the higher hourly rate.  And if you’re inclined, read what Paul Krugman has to say about Labor Day.

Foto by Hugh McCallion.  Pier 25 Manhatan.  Three hours til high tide and not much pier left for Pegasus and Harvey to rise.

Also pre-high tide on Rockaway, and water washing sand over the boardwalk onto Shore Front Parkway, finally justifying the name “sandy.”

Thanks to Hugh, Pam, and Barbara for the fotos.

Prayers for safety for all.

Here’s  some of my May 2010 coverage of Fleet Week’s arrival.  So Fleet Week and OpSail 2012 have converged, commingling state-of-the-art with traditional vessels.   Now add  into the mix F/A-18s and Hudson river water pumped through the system of  1931 John J. Harvey.  Doubleclick enlarges fotos.

Leading the fleet is Eagle.

And leading the tall ships is J. S. de Elcano (1927).

The day was blessed with atmospheric light

…and acrobatic and disciplined sailors.

Not as common a name to our ears as Magellan, Elcano was Magellan’s second-in-command and the one who completed “Magellan’s circumnavigation” more than a year after Magellan was killed in 1521.

Vessels included destroyer USS Roosevelt (commissioned 2000),

Gazela (1901), (Get tickets to this weekend’s Gazela theater here.)

USS San Jacinto (commissioned 1988),

and Dewaruci (launched 1953, keel laid 1932).

I wondered what these crew would do if the ominous sky sent thunder and lightning.

Etoile, I believe, was there as were

La Belle Poule (1932),

and Cisne Branco  (2000) and   HCMS Iroquois (1970, 1992).

Crew rode high in the rigging of Cisne Branco.

Cuauhtemoc (commissioned 1982) passed in review with

more crew in the rigging.

Emily Miller made the parade and in the distance, it’s  USS Gonzalez (commissioned 1996).

Click here for info on the namesake for DDG-66.

Appledore 5 crosses JS Shirane (commissioned 1980).

The sailing vessel heeled over is Summerwind (1929) and approaching is James Turecamo  (1969), prepared to handle white hulls.

Pride of Baltimore II is especially significant, given that the rationale for an OpSail event this year is the bicentennial of the war of 1812.   This fact also makes significant the participation by a Canadian and a British vessel in Fleet Week.

And huge flag . . . says it’s Gloria  (commissioned 1968), passing

RFA Argus, container ship turned floating hospital.

Colombian crew –men and women–in the rigging

and on the jibbom put on a colorful show.

Guayas (commissioned 1976)

had skyscraper crew at the very top of the mast.

And finally . .  a return for USS Wasp.   Notice the tug midships port side.  Know it?

I was surprised to learned it was neither Charles D. nor Responder but Roderick (1967) !  Generally, Roderick is not a sixth boro tug.

And here’s another unusual sight, commingling the power of a McAllister and a Moran  assisting Wasp into the berth.

Parade over, Catherine heads back to the dock, as does Pioneer (commissioned 1885!!)

And a final shot for today, TWO French handiworks, Belle Poule and the Statue of Liberty.

All fotos by will Van Dorp.

This just in:  an exemplar of French femininity is occupying Bedloe’s Island, and has done so for  . . . 125 years!!  And today . . . something just had to be done about it.  Rubber bullets?  No.  Tear gas canisters?  Nah.  Ghostbusters?  Daryl Hannah?

Bring in Aphrodite, former motor yacht of a Wall Street financier.    And as a testament to the tension between Liberte and Aphrodite, keep a fireboat near by.

Bring in bright lights to shine in the occupier’s eyes.

And when things begin to smolder, Hornblower Hybrid notwithstanding,

turn on the pumps, all

the pumps, and

intimidate with the largest vessel in that part of the harbor following an erratic course.

Cool it down with tens of thousands of gallons per minute.

Well . . . actually . . . let me join . . . bonne anniversaire, Mademoiselle Liberte, she who never sits down at her job.   I’m glad you’ve faithfully occupied that island, once used otherwise, all those years and spawned replicas all over the world.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Notice who is and is not represented in the parade.

Ooops!  I forgot, click here for “torchcam” and see things from the enlightener’s point of view.

A little more watercolor from yesterday . . . the rainbow injects magic into what otherwise might just be distant Brooklyn waterfront, Clipper City, and a Staten Island ferry.

Here’s what creates the conditions for a rainbow.

Color on water, this time reflecting a certain survey boat with unique paint loss patterns.

You will notice an apparent repetitiveness in the next set of fotos of Frying Pan over at Pier 66 Maritime–my favorite place on the Manhattan waterfront, except not

really.  The evanescent colored shapes so took me that I just keep shooting as

Harvey‘s propwash made ripples and

swirls and pulsations and

teases, glimpses of  LV-115 Frying Pan‘s chartreuse hairy nether parts.

All was fine until I imagined what other situations exist that colors the

waters this living red or

rusty, risky brown .

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

in other words, the newest, pumpingest FDNY boat, which–if it serves as many years as Firefighter has–will be in service beyond 2080.  343 is the vessel facing in the lower left, the one not spraying yet.  The year 2080, now that’s a world I cannot imagine, but as to today’s welcome . . . enjoy the fotos.

Just the facts: one of two, designed by Naval Architects Robert Allan LTD.  The pressurized cabin offers protection against chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear contamination.  Dimensions:  140′ x 36′ x 9′ with four 2000 hp MTU diesels.  Screws are approximately two-meter diameter controllable pitch Hundestedts.  Crew of seven.  Top pump output:  50,000 gpm.  Price tag:  $27 million.

Many thanks to fireboat.org and the John J. Harvey for my ride.  Click here for google images (including bowsprite’s)  of the Harvey, and here for info on Jessica Dulong’s book, in which Harvey plays a pivotal role.  Harvey cranked up her own water display.

Our Lady (herself once damaged by a terror explosion in 1916) offered her welcome, and

rainbows arced hither and yon over the sixth boro, here created by John D. McKean.

The forward ballast tank allows 343 to lower the bow into the water to ease people transfer.

Once past the Statue, she passed Ellis Island and then

headed over toward Lower Manhattan, where

she paused,

placed a wreath for the three hundred forty-three firefighters who died in that event back in 2001, before

the three large FDNY boats diverged, here left to right, 343, Firefighter, and John D. McKean.

Welcome.  No one knows what events she faces.  I wish her an uneventful and boring life.

All fotos, Will Van Dorp.

For old salt’s perspective . . . click here.

For video of her launch at Eastern Ship Building in Panama City, Florida, click here.

Just the facts:  Firefighter entered service in 1938 designed by Gibbs and Cox (who also designed the SS United States and the LCS)  . . . to last and last and last.  And she has.  Firefighter is not only the oldest active-duty FDNY vessel but also

she who can deliver the highest gpm (20,000) through her pumps.  One of Firefighter‘s finest moments occured in 1973 . . . after the collision of Sea Witch and Esso Brussels. just north of the Verrazano Narrows Bridge.   See great text and  fotos of that accident here.   Salvaged portions of Sea Witch live on in Chemical Pioneer, still a regular in the sixth boro.  See her (Witch Pioneer) stern in this tugster post from a year ago.

Dimensions:  Built in Staten Island.  134′ x 32′ x 9′ with twin 16-cylinder 1500 hp engines.  gCaptain wrote about it here.  Watch a very informative 18-minute video here.

The Rolls-Royce of fireboats . . .

All fotos by Will Van Dorp in early March 2010.

If you’re still in the mood for video, you might check out this new site for cruiser USS  Olympia (C-6), featuring new reels of the battleship parading up the Hudson with Dewey on board in 1899, post-Battle of Manila Bay and Spanish-American War.  The second newsreel has the best video, 1899 technology.    Olympia today is is ship in trouble.

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My job . . . Summer 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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