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I’m very impressed . . . all the images I put up yesterday got identified and within a few hours either in comments section or on Facebook.

The top foto yesterday came from Thomas Scian of the USS Slater project in Albany.  Click here to read the latest Slater Signals publication with info about the upcoming dry-docking.   Thomas has promised to keep us informed about the tow down the Hudson around mid-February–in two weeks or so already– so that this transit can be well-photographed.  I took the foto below back in September 2013.  Here’s the navsource.org info on Slater.

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The engine room pics came from Kelsey Patrick Connors.  The first engine room is from Navigator, with twin EMDs 12-645-e4, 2150hp each.   Here’s a foot of Navigator Norfolk-bound out  the Narrows.

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Some of you commented on how clean the Detroit Diesel was.  It’s one of two 16-cylinder 149s at 900 hp that power Outrageous.   I took these fotos of Outrageous in May 2009.

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Thanks much to Kelsey and Thomas for use of the pics.   Thanks all of you for your answers.   I have no news on Sea Lion.

Lots of images you can try to identify today, but I’ll hold any further info until tomorrow.

First . . .  this vessel will be visible and will be an interesting subject of photographs from many points along the Hudson next month,  February.  Clue:  Note the hull  color.

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Unrelated to the top foto . . . any guesses about this and

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and this from the same vessel and

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this from the same fleet?   Both vessels are occasional visitors in the sixth boro.

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And finally . . . from a secret salt, a foto easy to identify.  My question in whether there’s any news about this incident.

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You’ll have some answers tomorrow.

Finally . . . here are some of my favorite ice pics on the Hudson taken a few years back by Paul Strubeck.

And here’s hat’s off to my Canadian cousins . . . if case you missed this late addition to yesterday’s post.

What’s this?  Reptile skin?

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A major East coast river.

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Here’s the post I did when Reinauer Twins came to the sixth boro for the first ever time.  What pushes this bow through the ice . . .

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some 400+ feet back . . .

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is Reinauer Twins in her third winter, probably

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her toughest winter yet.

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Hope the cabins are warm . . .

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The unit goes through the ice like a dart.

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I can’t wait til July, myself.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

A late addition .  . I’ll add it to tomorrow’s post too . . . what would our northern neighbors do on a river like this?  You gotta see it here.

I don’t know how many folks were glued to this webcam yesterday, but I was not the only one.  Let me walk us around the foto, different in subtle ways than the other five in this post.   First, note the time stamp upper left:  it’s 11:16 a.m.   This was happening yesterday midmorning at the Miraflores Lock, the first of three set of lifts out of the Pacific on a transit toward the Atlantic/Caribbean.  In the distance on the right side, the large white object is Norwegian Star, negotiating the next set of locks . . . Pedro Miguel Locks.

The ship almost fully shown in this foto is Tai Success, bound for Altamira, Mexico.  Tai Success is 656′ loa (length overall)  by 104′ , the maximum width for the current set of locks.   Extending from lower left is the ex-Left Coast Lifter, towed by Lauren Foss.    Note the relative size of Tai Success and the crane barge.   Lauren Foss at 141′  loa is larger than almost all tugs currently on the Hudson.

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11:20 a. m.  The entire crane is in the lock chamber.  On the stern of the crane barge is Cerro Majagual, a 2013 Panama Canal tug built in Spain.  For the transit from the San Francisco Bay area to Panama, this role was played by another Foss tug, Iver Foss.  Iver is currently waiting for the tow on the Atlantic side.

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11:24.   The water in the lock has started to rise.

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11:30

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11:40.  The doors on the high side of the Miraflores Locks have opened and the tow heads for Pedro Miguel.  By the way, on the horizon beyond the Pedro Miguel you can see the Centennial Bridge, about 10 years old.  As of this writing this morning, the tow was docked just north of this bridge.  I suspect it will complete the transit and be on the Atlantic side by the end of today.

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I see from the Journal News story that Fluor has already changed the crane name from Left Coast Lifter to I Lift New York, presuming they’ve “purged the old from Poseidon’s ledger.”  If you look at the fourth foto above, you’ll notice “Left Coast Lifter” is still painted there.  I wonder when that will be painted over;  maybe the name purging will happen in Gatun Lake today?

Meanwhile, I’d like to propose some alternatives . . .  Hudson River Hoister and Tappan Zee Titan are more local and maintain  the same LCL pattern.

As to size, currently the largest crane in the Hudson Valley is DonJon’s Chesapeake 1000, the number being its tonnage lifting capacity.    Last summer in Rio, I saw a crane called Pelicano 1 with a lifting capacity said to exceed 2000 tons.  The ex-LCL is said to hav a capacity around 1900 tons.

Click here for one of the posts I did from the Panama Canal–a place well worth a visit and a second visit– about two years ago.

Keep in mind that once the tow clears the Atlantic side locks, it’s still more than 2000 nautical miles from the Narrows.  Assuming an average speed of seven knots and no delays for weather or other causes, that’s still almost two weeks.  So, I’ll wager ETA at the Narrows around February 1.

OK . . . I’ll admit that I’m foolish enough to think every day is Christmas, every day in New Years,  . . . and I could go on.

So happy 18th day of Christmas 2013.   And my heart-felt thanks go out to Tim and Bill Hughes of Hughes Marine for these images.  Thanks also to John Skelson who helped reformat them for this blog.

Let’s go back to November 1997.  Tugboat Spuyten Duyvil delivered a barge carrying a Torsilieri truck carrying a Norway spruce bound for Rockefeller Center.

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The tree was felled in Stony Point.  Click here for the article by James Barron detailing the tree transaction.

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If that tree is 74 feet, that’s a long trailer.

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You gotta love those red balls.  By the way, Hughes logo on the barge was painted out for this transit.

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Here were some fotos taken in the Upper Bay.  I highly recommend getting the children’s book version of the story in part to see the artistic liberties taken in rendering both tug and truck.

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Fireboat John D. McKean  does the honors.

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Although I’m still working on locating more pics of this event, including Joyce Dopkeen’s shots of the offloading process, I am thrilled to share these with you here.

Again, many heartfelt thanks to Bill Hughes for sending these photos and to John Skelson for reformatting them.

I hope to have more belated “christmas” fotos soon.

Darell T. Gilbert took this foto . . .  a hot air balloon over the water in Red Hook around the 5th of January.  WTF?!@#@!!  Anyone know the story?

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Thanks to Sam Zapadinsky . . . can you identify this creature walking on the icy upper Hudson?  Coyote?  Here’s a post from a few years ago of eagles on the mostly frozen river.

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Sam also took this foto from the tug Frances, which

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is the forwardmost tug in this foto by Bob Dahringer.    Frances and Kathleen Turecamo move crude oil tanker Afrodite into the dock in Albany, one of many water tasks that happens whether the temperatures are 0 or 100.

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And finally, Mike Abegg took this foto of Alice Oldendorff in the Brooklyn Navy yard, taking on

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fuel.  Quantico Creek and a Dann Marine boat (either Chesapeake or Discovery Coast) assist with this operation in the ice-choked area around the docks.

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Thanks much to Darell, Sam, Bob, and Mike for these fotos.

Click here for Bob Dahringer’s YouTube videos, recently with a lot of ice.

Check this video report on USCG ice-breaking in the upper Hudson as well as this one of Ellen McAllister shifting ships safely on cold days.

Now here from Harbin, China is a completely other reaction to cold weather.

David Hindin alerted me when this voyage started on November 8 . . . departing San Francisco, sixth boro bound.  I’m very happy to share some folks fotos of Tradewinds Miss Lis‘ arrival at the Narrows this morning.   Many thanks to Peter Michael Patrick Codd, who sent the first two.

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Here  . . . as seen from the Brooklyn side.

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John Skelson caught these next ones.  Click here for larger versions on his Flickr photostream.

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Note a new-to-NY assist tug here . . . Pelham.  I hope someone on Pelham got some good pics.

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Many thanks to Peter and John for letting me share their fotos here.

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And David . . . while I was driving my way back to NYC through central NJ, he got this record of the last mile of the voyage . . . image thanks to marinetraffic.com

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This bargeload is support equipment for the herculean  (oops . . . that’s just a storm?) Left Coast Lifter now heading south from San Francisco to the Panama Canal to work on the Tappan Zee bridge project.    Here’s a link to Tappan Zee Constructors.

My sincere Merry Christmas/Happy 2014 wishes to all of you.  Actually, I hit the road Monday morning for the now-annual road trip to see family in greater Atlanta.

Consider this my Christmas card.  Any ideas what this is?  These three fotos come courtesy of Nancy Donskoj.

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It’s the tugboat Gowanus Bay delivering Sinterklaas and his entourage up the rondout to Kingston, NY’s annual Sinterklaas festival.   Sinterklaas is the red-clad legend I was first made aware of, and he would supposedly arrive on December 5.   Click here for more pics.    Kingston was the third oldest settlement in New Netherland.

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Believe it or not, Sinterklaas stories are clouded in some controversy because of the guy standing to his left.  Actually not this guy per se at all.  In the Dutch tradition, this man is Zwarte Piet . .  or Black Pete.  The Americanization in the foto below is interesting.

As the Dutch say, prettige kerstfest.

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The next two pics come thanks to Jen Muma currently of New Orleans, and it’s fuel for the

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Christmas bonfire.

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Here are two East Coast traditions, but I’m thinking the sixth boro really doesn’t have much PUBLIC Christmas tradition spectacle related to the water at all.  Four years ago, I floated an idea about a harbor tree inspired by what folks do in New England, but I’ve moved on.  For myself, I like the idea below, the nautical clutter tree in my friend Ed Fanuzzi’s backyard.

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Have a festive day with your loved ones.  I will repost again in a few days.

Thanks again to Nancy and Jen for use of their photos.

Chancellor . . . built pre-World War 2 in Brooklyn.  This post is timed to satisfy a request from Bob Price  . . . as follows:  “as part of a group working to restore the tug boat Chancellor, I am trying to find any extant engineering documentation regarding her construction details.  Built by Bushey & Sons in 1938, it is currently in the keeping of the Waterford Maritime Historical Society and my group of volunteers recently arranged to have it moved into dry dock at Lock 3 of the Erie Canal where we laboriously winterized it, pumped its bilges dry and a making plans to create a very thorough hit list of things to do.   If you would be so kind as to point me in the direction of any person or entity that might have access to drawings or any engineering related stuff pertaining to the Chancellor I would be most appreciative.  Thanks for your time.     Bob Price    Knox, NY      518.895.8954   The first three fotos below come from Bob.

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The next three I took in 2010.  Here she’s cruises north on the Hudson headed for Troy.

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Here’s she’s downbound following W. O. Decker into the Federal Lock.

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Housedown, she prepares to depart the bulkhead in Waterford.

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And in my foto from either 2006 or  2007 she goes nose-to-nose with Gowanus Bay.

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If anyone knows the whereabouts of construction drawings or other plans for Chancellor, you can also email me and I’ll pass the info on to Bob and his group.  Click here to see Fred tug44′s video of Chancellor being pushed upstream by the tagteam of Ben Elliot and National.

All ships are basically containers.  They are –after all– sometimes called vessels.   And just as is true of a FedEx aircraft or a semi or a plain-brown wrapper . . . ship’s names give little clue about what’s in the holds.  So for now, let’s just look at a few and leave it at that:  they are a delight to look at.

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Would this be pronounced “pango?”

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And finally from Maureen . . . our elusive and fast Afrodite, southbound for St. John.

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Thanks to Maureen for this last one.  All other by Will Van Dorp.

 

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