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Small craft to come, but first . . . the missing foto from yesterday’s post . . . how DID the heaving line get through the eye aka “closed chock”?  Hope this foto helps;  I do believe I see the monkeyfist flying upward from the crewman at the rail;  crew on the upper level passed it to the crewman forward of the chock?

It’s been over two years since I’ve used this title. Small craft  come in many shapes,

are operated by professional mariners,

respond to emergencies with versatility,

and shuttle specialists between shore and much larger craft.

This one I first thought was transporting booms but now I think had some festive mission, given what appears to be a sizable bouquet over the engine compartment.

They operate for many agencies,

commercial entities,

government services, and

and law enforcement groups.

They work in diverse

weather, all

year round.

Enjoy a few more:

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who apologizes for not knowing who operates some of these small craft.

Ironically, Road Fotos 17 were taken where this post ends up.  And I had planned NOT to post today, but . . .  time affords posting, and posting makes a drive more like a gallivant.  Given that I drove to Hampton Roads, it’s interesting to reflect on what scenes are absent from this post.  Three hours after locking my house door, I was on New Jersey at the southern tip on NJ, looking

across Delaware Bay, where I narrowly missed a close up

with a Kirbyfied . . .  can you guess? . . . .

Greenland Sea.   Lots of other vessels anchored just outside the channel, here looking roughly toward the northwest.

Entering Lewes, we met a dozen or so dolphins . . . who all managed to evade

my camera, which seems to be more skilled with stationary objects like this pilot boat.

I’m guessing a fish boat, although I’ve not seen this configuration before.   It reminds me of an updated version of a menhaden boat?

The Cape Charles light is a skeleton a quarter mile inland.

The lights at Fort Story in the background, and Trabzon and Red Iris anchored outside Hapmton Roads.

This might be USS Samuel Eliot Morison foreground and USCGC Legare farther away.  And then again, the nearer vessel might be something else.

And finally, any guesses what Atlantic Dawn is towing into the mouth the the Chesapeake?

Cutterhead dredge Illinois!!  If Illinois makes it all the way to the sixth boro, you know who will have more opportunities to perfect her rendition of the toothy snouted machine.

And the reason for this gallivant–other than gallivanting for its own sake– will be clearer tomorrow.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp today.

@#$#!! . . . as I write this, USAV Winfield Scott is passing the precise location Atlantic Dawn was 90 minutes ago.  To see USAV Winfield Scott, check Jed’s most recent post here.

So what happens in the rest of the sixth boro during Fleet Week?  Works goes on.  Ellen goes past the Statue to the next job, possibly to move USCGC Eagle out.

As is McKinley Sea, with its Kirby livery.

Terrapin Island continues its 24/7 sand moving.

Tankers transfer fluids and container vessels come and go.

Susquehanna follows Quantico Creek to the east.

Holiday jetskiers race off bow waves, abandoning prudence and caution.

Gulf Service awaits an appointment at the tanks.

Ice-bowed Ice Hawk, newly painted and

maybe newly-named, awaits its call.

And (in town for OpSail, Bay City, Michigan registered Appledore V, enjoys the late Monday sun and breeze.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated from Lake Michigan:  1907 SS Keewatin moves.

Doubleclick enlarges most fotos.  Few words here, but lots of fotos of the cast that has now converged.  Count them . . . five here and

one more here, along with OOCL Kuala Lumpur in the distance, a lube tanker servicing an oil tanker closeup, and a dredger  in the distance to the right.

From Colombia, it’s Gloria, with Buchanan 1 towing two stone scows in the distance.

From Ecuador, it’s Guayas, with a

condor as a figurehead.

From Indonesia, it’s Dewaruci, with

a regal figurehead and

exuberant crew.

From Mexico, it’s Cuauhtemoc, which is also

the name of the figurehead.

From Brazil, it’s Cisne Branco.

And finally, of the vessels already in Gravesend Bay, it’s the schooner Juan Sebastian De Elcano.

All at anchor, awaiting the parade tomorrow.

Mare Atlantic also awaits orders or appointments within

view of the cliffs of Manhatan.

Thanks to Working Harbor Committee for organizing and executing this sneak preview boat tour tonight.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated:  See who I missed at South Street Seaport!@#@!!

Note the Crowley props and the orange-clad crew.  Doubleclick enlarges image.

Note the huge design difference between Socrates (1966, 3200 hp) and

Heron (1968, 3200 hp).  

My question is this:  what is the actual weight added to Swan by these five tugs, one barge, and one crewboat?  Does the load change the draft of Swan at all, given that she like any vessel is ballasted as needed?  And I do not know the answer.

For outatowners, these shots from Bay Ridge show the “west” end of the Verrazano Bridge.  Yesterday’s fotos were taken from the bluff more or less just above the white dome of the lighthouse.

And for this foto, I pivoted slightly toward the south, capturing both towers of the Bridge.  Entering the Narrows is a ferry and dredger

Terrapin Islandwhich as recently as two and a half months ago was sucking up silt from Jed’s coast in southern Georgia.

All fotos this morning by Will Van Dorp, who probably has one more installment on Swan.  For the title, my apologies to Marcel Proust.

Thanks to Harold and eastriver for their recent comments on (I’d say) opposing points of view on change, on of the future of the sixth boro as a major port.  Work has proceeded apace for a future involving larger vessels.  The barely visible yellow vessel in the foreground is one instrument in that work.  Some specs and a company foto of her, drill boat Kraken, can be found at the bottom of this company site.     By her virtual invisibility, she reminds of USS Monitor.

Low profile does not translate to low power.  With her three towers, Kraken drills holes into bedrock, inserts dynamite, and then triggers the blast to loosen that rock so that shovels on other Cashman and DonJon vessels can remove it.

The structure on stilts here must be mission control, like the “tower” for mid-20th century air traffic controllers.  Work was happening Sunday despite the cold snap.

After a blast, as I said, shovels transfer loosened materials into scows towed by vessels like Atlantic Salvor  to “dump sites” offshore.  notice in the background another drill ship, Apache, which I wrote about here.   Atlantic Salvor here tows the scow underneath Bayonne Bridge, another controversial target of change in the sixth boro as a port. I wrote about this here and here back last November, on the days of the 80th anniversary of the dedication of the Bridge.

Two notes:  First, not all the dredging in the sixth boro relates to navigation.  Along the Passaic River in Newark NJ, a dredging project to remove Agent Orange -related contamination is underway.  See a video on this project here.

Second, way over the horizon, but just a week away by sea is another node of this change in the sixth boro . . . I mean the Panama Canal.    Note one of the dredge boats Samson in lower right of this screen capture of the Atlantic end of the Canal.   Samson is one of the vessels operated by DEME-Group Dredging International, a contractor working on enlarging the Panama Canal.   Another one of their vessels is Yuang Dong 007, a larger version of Kraken and Apache.  Note that the screen capture below is time-sensitive.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who’s beginning to feel a stronger gravitational pull from the Canal.

Unrelated:  in today’s NYTimes, check out this article on maritime whistleblowers.

And (thanks to a reminder from jpaul) these 1940s/50s fotos of NYC by Charles W. Cushman published in yesterday’s NYTimes.

Here’s my post from a year ago. Where HAS the time gone?  A joy of doing this blog is to go back, and sometimes as with this one, my memory–or is it my gut–recalls the eagerness of that morning 365 days ago.  What I pursued then I still pursue  . . .

Can you spot anything in the foto below that suggests the time of year?  Answer follows.  All fotos look better if you enlarge by doubleclicking on them.

Oyster Creek reenacts a moment with the Bayonne Bridge that mimics a Fractor scene (see my “masthead” atop each post) from five years back.

L. W. Caddell struts out into the KVK all in a day’s work that

shows off its bollard pull.

Mary Alice (ex-Gulf Sword, 1974) sashays back to the work on the channel near Shooters.  I wonder, given how long the deepening of  the sixth boro channels has been ongoing and how from the surface, the water looks unchanged, has anyone heard of a moniker for this project akin to “big dig,”  a Boston phenomenon?

Behemoths like NYK Romulus, relatively small given the world fleet, benefits from this dredging.  Notice the red/green detail nearly in the center of this foto.  Might that be on-deck controls for a bow thruster?

In her last moments of this leg of her never-ending journey, she’s assisted by Gramma Lee T Moran and

Margaret Moran.  Without the dredging and without assistance, Romulus would never get here and

negotiate this

S-curve.  Notice in the distance, where on Shooters shore the dredging currently focuses.  If you missed this post showing Shooters a century ago, click here.  If you want a comparison then and now, click here.

So, did you find the seasonal reference in the top foto?  Here’s another look . . . move your eye toward the bell in front of Amy Moran‘s  raised wheelhouse.  Piney branches.  I like it.  And I’m thrilled to see Ice Babe Base back in town.

Parting shot for this solstice:  from left to right, Barney Turecamo, Amy Moran, and Turecamo Boys Girls (Thanks, Harold!).

Saturday I hit the road for the south, Chattahoochee watershed, then Cape Fear, then maybe Newport News.  Tomorrow I may put up some road fotos not yet used from the last trip.

Thanks for reading.  Peace,  friendship, prosperity, and imagination to all of you.    Health too.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, today. . . . first day of winter . . . 63 degrees in the sixth boro!

. . . not nearly so catchy a mnemonic  as “right red returning,” but it means the same thing.  Thomas J. Brown green left returning,

McCormack Boys green right going,

Kristy Ann Reinauer green port returning,

A nameless Caldwell truckable tug green starboard going,

Miss Gill with scow GPR (green port returning),

NJ State Police GSG,

scow GPR . . .

Miriam GSG,

Atlantic Salvor and scow,

That green 9 in the KVK is a great place to set up fotos, but IMHO, it’s best to stick with “right red returning” as a memory keeper.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

What a treat . . .  swimming beneath the first summer full moon of 2011 in a new climate zone for me.  No matter what other people call it,  I’ll call it “gallivant and relax” moon.

The day before . . .  at the mouth of the St. Johns River, a shrimper, one would hope carries more “swimmy-things” than birds, although  there’s no guarantee.  I love the two pelicans on the portside gear.

Crewboat East River and dredger–either Padre Island or Dodge Island–suggest something of the range of GLD&D vessels . . .  a year ago they might have worked the sixth boro of New York.

This is looking west here along the channel between Fisher Island (south) and Dodge Island, where the container port is located.  Being here has forced me to look at and appreciate the development of greater Miami and Biscayne Bay in a whole new way . . .  Venetian Islands?!@!#!!

Fisher Island, named for an automotive tycoon –still possibly the most exclusive neighborhood in the USA–has its own ferry system.

Truckable tug Toucan and barge auto carrier . . .  I have to find more info here.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who is a bit overwhelmed by Miami . . . and has so far only seen the barrier beach.

Quick post . . . when will Janice Ann Reinauer and the other emigrants load onto Blue Marlin?

Peking‘s 100th birthday aka launch date has NOT officially been mentioned by South Street Seaport Museum . . . her guardian . . . but then again, nothing else has been discussed in detail by this secretive disorganization.  A good dozen folks spoke on behalf of saving the museum at last night’s Community Board 1 meeting.

Thanks much to Justin Nash for this foto of the horns of Brangus;  she worked in NYC waters  for Great Lakes Dock and Dredge two years ago, but I’ve never seen a foto of the horns of this mighty vessel . . . til now, and maybe neither have you.  Tugboats used to regularly sport eagles atop the house.

And finally, for now, Hocking came through the KVK recently with what appeared to be loosely attached outriggers.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Finally, three people asked yesterday whether I had “coined” the now-ubiquitous term “sixth boro” to refer to the waters that unite the other five boros of New York City and its Jersey neighbors.  The answer is–for that usage–YES, loud and clear.  And I’m thrilled that so many folks have adopted the term.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

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Seth Tane American Painting

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My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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