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Click here to read the first five posts in this series.

I’ve noticed the vessel below docked along the south side of GMD Bayonne the last few days, and wondered about the name, Capt. David I Lyon, which sounds unusually American for a ship in the harbor.   Looking closer, I see the  black-gray-blue-yellow stack stripes that identify it as an MSC vessel, not to be confused with this type of MSC vessel.   I turns out Capt. David I Lyon is a very newly christened MSC vessel, and here’s the rest of the story.    Hat’s off.

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Completely unrelated . . . there must be some fish swarming alongside the vessel, maybe feeding and leaving scraps for the gulls.

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Check out Zim Texas, looking like a typical sixth boro sized c-ship . . . loaded with a few thousand identical containers.  But . . .

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up there near the top of the stack . . .

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I’ll never know what oversize cargo is wrapped there.  Here’s a post I did the first time I noticed that not all cargo on a c-ship is containers.  Here’s another.

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And finally, yesterday I overheard the conversation of these two cormorants .  . saying something about Gabby and the brightly colored squares, and I thought they were talking about a 1960s rock band I don’t remember.    But then I looked out beyond the two chatty birds and noticed

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Gabby.  That Gabby, but what was the cargo on this barge?

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Can you see it better here . . . thanks to New York Media Boat, the best way to see what’s happening in the sixth boro.  Many thanks to Bjoern for sharing this photo.   Here, from the Staten Island Advance, is more detail.

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Again . . . thanks to my friend Bjoern for sharing this photo.  And if you are out on the water today, keep your eyes open wide . . . and cameras handy.

All other photos by Will Van Dorp.

At 0630 today . . .  this vessel was still in Gravesend Bay, flanked by two tugboats.  I recalled it’d been there for about two days.

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As the tide turned, one assist tug switched out and others added.

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Three hours later . . . it was Margaret Moran, Joan Turecamo, and Marion Moran . . . and

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then Gramma Lee T Moran hooked into the bow, totaling over 16,000 hp if needed.  Pretty World looked like a dead ship.

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Towing stern first,

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Gramma Lee T brought her into Upper Bay by noon and then on to GMD Bayonne.  It looks like time to pop the hood on Pretty World.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here were 11, which clarifies the title . ..  I hope.

I’ve had these fotos from Seth Tane for quite some time.  I looked at them today while culling fotos from my library.  Foto shows Foss tugs moving the Sauvie Island Bridge span into position near Portland, Oregon.  Foss tugs visible are (I believe)  the larger PJ Brix and Jim Moore.

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This foto also shows Daniel Foss. The bridge move happened in late December 2007;  see page 6 of this Foss publication.  Looking up info on the Sauvie Island Bridge, I stumbled on the clever Flickr assemblage of fotos with the string “island bridge” in the name.  Try playing with it to see bridges with those two words juxtaposed from everywhere.

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Like I said, I was scrolling through and culling my 2008 fotos.  Joan McAllister . . .  haven’t seen it in a long time.

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Ditto Crow.  Has she been scrapped?

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Here’s a summer 2008 treat, tandem pushing Aegean Sea and Caribbean Sea, although still on Roehrig colors.  The K-Sea colors on both have yet to come and by now both have been repainted.

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Later in summer 2008 I took this, M/T Great Gull . . . now operating near the Panama Canal.

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And  . . . last one for today, Odin passing the stern of ITB Groton, also sold foreign. ITBs like Groton, obsolete now, were technically catamaran tugs.  Just forward of where the stream of water is exiting the hull is the “bow” of the tug;  look above it and you’ll see the “seam” where tug and barge conjoin.   I posted about ITBs here back in late November 2007, and since

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I’ve been enhancing my fotos on this blogs, let me add a few to that post here.  Here I’m looking between the “hulls” of the catamaran and toward the stern.  Note the portside prop.  For scale, note the size of the “lift basket” and yard worker.  The aftmost portside portion of the “barge” fits into the groove.

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Here’s the aftmost port starboard side of the barge.  These two fotos were taken in the Brooklyn Navy Yard GMD November 2007.

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Thanks much to Seth for starting this 2007/08 flashback.  I feel like a veritable John Titor after this glance back at how much the harbor has changed in five years.  All fotos except otherwise attributed, are mine.

And totally unrelated . . . prepare to laugh yerself buttless  bad lip reading the NFL.   This one is a guaranteed laugh-producer too . . . what they really said in the first debate.

As I write this post, Lincoln Sea is southbound on the Hudson, just south of where Stena Primorsk ran out of the channel a month or so ago.  Weddell Sea/Lincoln Sea foto was taken back in earlier September 2012.

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This closeup of the Lincoln Sea-DBL 140 embrace seems small and intimate until you read the gradations on the the barge .  . . those numbers mark feet.

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Length and breath of the tug-barge unit

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is 597′ x 79.’

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Ocean Leader, here coming into the Narrows four days ago and currently in Port of Albany,  is also 597′ loa but a little beamier:  105′ . . .  panamax wide.

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I don’t have the tug/barge dimensions of B. Franklin Reinauer/RTC 82, here paralleling Ocean Leader.

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Behind tugboat John P. Brown (75′ x 26′) lies Stena Primorsk, in the “hole” undergoing repairs at Bayonne Dry Dock & Repair, and shown

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here about a week pre-accident.  Dimensions of Stena Primorsk:  597′ x 131′ . . . . 280,000 barrel capacity.  Lincoln Sea‘s DBL 140 capacity is 140,000 barrels.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

A line locker, in my experience, is the place on a boat where all manner of miscellaneous line and rope is kept.  It’s like the “junk drawer” in your house.  I haven’t used this title in over three years, but when I get behind and have a set of unrelated fotos, it seems a needed catergory.

So . . .  since yesterday’s post had a foto of  Indy 7, which Harold Tartell’s wonderfully detailed in a comment, I went back to fotos from two years ago that I’ve never posted.  Behold the stern of Indy 7′s mother ship, Brooklyn Navy Yard’s own CV-62, USS Independence, which as of two years ago still

languished in Bremerton, WA, next to another Brooklyn vessel, USS Constellation, the last carrier built anywhere other than Norfolk.    Indy 7 . . . behold your mother.

The next three fotos come from John Watson.  Here’s another shot of the Chinese-built Algerian corvette Soummam 937.  Here–scroll through interesting fotos of other “small navies” –are some fotos of Soummam at the shipyard in Shanghai.

Also from John, recently the Massachusetts Maritime Academy T/S Kennedy left the sixth boro after work at GMD Brooklyn.

Here’s John’s Friday morning foto of Horizon Producer, in service since 1974;  by Saturday, she was outbound for San Juan.

I took this foto Friday morning, mostly curious about the two tanks on the afterdeck.

A few weeks ago here I ran the “fish flag.”  In response, Capt. Mark Helmkamp, manager of Ocean Tug and Salvage Ship class for the Military Sealift Command wrote the following:  “I had APACHE paint the “Fish Flag” on her bridge wing in reference to the Navy ASR’s – particularly the CHANTICLEER Class that I rode as a young officer – as the T-ATFs picked up that Navy mission along with the T-ARSs when the ASRs (CHANTICLEERs and PIGEONs) were decom’d.  The Fish Flag was flown during Submarine Rescue Chamber ops – the McCann chamber – designed by Swede Momsen, [my note:  who grew up in Queens].  The ASRs used to exercise the SRC to a ‘false seat” a few times a year after laying a four-point moor using the “cloverleaf method” that preceded GPS. . .

 We also had the Fish Flag painted on the bows of the ASRs…this goes back to the SQUALUS rescue. . .

Currently, SALVOR [T-ARS-52] is eligible to paint the Fish Flag too as she has worked the SRC for training.”

The MSC poster below shows sibling vessels of Salvor.

When I visited Apache in Little Creek, I also saw Grapple ARS-53.

Grapple was involved in the recovery efforts for Egypt Air Flight 990 off Nantucket in 1999.   Click here for a complete set of missions performed by T-ARS Grasp, including the recovery of JFK Jr.’s Piper 32 and remains.

Thanks to all who contributed.

Unrelated:  Thanks to Walter Scott for sending along this obit.

Actually that title captures 98% of this blog’s +1800 posts.  And just as elsewhere in Gotham or anywhere else, so on the sixth boro what work you see depends entirely on your station.  And my station this particular day was Tchefuncte River’s  Equitable Equipment‘s hull # 1428, delivered in August 1966 as Red Star Towing‘s New Haven.  Now she’s Freddie K. Miller;  I took the foto below just over five years ago when she was Stapleton Service.    I use this foto here because a downside of being on the tow is my inability to get a foto OF the tow.

At 0520 hrs, dawn was sweetest and coolest, from this point a mile south of Miller’s Launch.  When I reported at 0530, the Miller’s yard was already busy.

The crew of Freddie K Miller’s had a job: pick up Weeks Crane Barge 552 and its crew and proceed to the East River ConEd.  By 0615, crew was making the tow.

0645 we were crossing west to east across the Upper Bay.  Buchanan 1 was towing a scow  and

Douglas B. Gurion headed west for passengers.  The ferry is named for a victim of September 11.

0715 . ..  near Red Hook container port, we passed this ex-MSC vessel Transatlantic.  I will post more MSC soon.

0730 . . . we had passed under the Brooklyn Bridge and now could feast on this potpourri of  Manhattan skyline.  Side by side on the right are Gehry’s flowing-facade 8 Spruce (2011) and Gilbert’s spiky-tower (1913).

0745 . . . we pass GMD Shipyard, where morning shift has already started its work on Massachusetts Maritime’s TS Kennedy  (1967).

0815 . . . the crew have tied to the ConEd dock and Weeks’ crew has begun setting the spuds, for stability as the load is transferred.  My very general understanding of this load is that ConEd purchased equipment from  Manufacturer M.  Company A trucked it to the Weeks yard because installation by land (by Company B) was less feasible than installation from water.  Miller’s job was to move equipment on crane barge to ConEd so that Weeks–with collaboration from Company B–could set equipment exactly where it will be used.

0915 . . . first equipment is lifted and rotated over the East River counterclockwise to avoid obstacles on land, and at

0920 . . .  crew guides unit into exact location.  If half an inch off, then lift and get it right.

1010 . . . next piece of equipment is moved.   While the tug stands by with the crane barge, Miller crew does fine carpentry work in wheelhouse.

Since my self-appointed job is to record details, check out Carolina IV, sailing westbound on the East river . . . hailing from Stockholm,  Yes, sailing!  and  . . . yes . . . that Stockholm while

eastbound are Gage Paul Thornton and a floatplane.

1115 . . . heavy-duty pipe elbow gets lifted into place. Tower protruding from the building just right of MetLife is Chrysler Building.

1215 . . . the spuds are up,  the crane boom lowered and secured, Freddie K Miller has spun off the dock and now heads back westbound for the Weeks yard.  If the grayish vessel in the foreground is locally known as a “honey boat,” then this has to be one of the sweetest scenes possible in these parts.

1300 . . . as we approach the Weeks yard we cross Buchanan 12 towing three stone scows, possibly headed for a quarry up the Hudson.

1330 . . . Freddy K Miller is now “light,” having left the barge at the Weeks yard.  Ever Decent is outbound for sea, and by this writing is southbound off Cape Hatteras.

Meanwhile, close to Manhattan, Asphalt Star takes on bunker fuel from a Vane barge.  That black hose . . . that’s like the hose at the pump where you fill your car tank.

By 1400, I’ve said my thanks to the crew of Freddy K Miller —who await their next job on this or another vessel–and the dispatcher, and take a break to examine a familiar sight:  Alice, she who inspired my first ever blogpost!!

Back on the bank and before heading home, I get another shot;  she’s loaded deep with her Canadian aggregates.

Imagine my delight, then, later that day getting a foto from Mike C. of Alice Oldendorff north of the Navy Yard self-unloading her cargo of crushed stone.

Many thanks to all the folks at Miller’s Launch.  Also, thank you Mike for sending along this last foto.  All other fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Any guesses about the location on the far shore with the spiky masts?

The water is Hampton Roads, where ironclads first clashed.  Monitor was built in Brooklyn, and I’ve never known where the Merrimack, sailing as CSS  Virginia originated.

Here’s a closer-up view of the fleet in Norfolk, with Miss Katheryne (?) closer inshore.

Since I’m putting this post up quickly, I haven’t discovered much about the huge coal docks in Dunbar neighborhood (?) of Newport News.

From near to far:  USNS T-AKR 310 Watson, T-AKR-304 Pililaau T-AK 3006 Eugene Obregon, and T-AKR 311 Sisler.  Sisler, as recorded here on this blog,  arrived in the sixth boro a bit over a year ago for maintenance at GMD Bayonne.

Coming into the quite breezy Roads is MSC Florentino.

Here’s another shot of Florentina as she passes an unidentified dragger.

Another unidentified bulker in the mouth of Chesapeake Bay.  Star Breeze?

Actually, I’m back in the sixth boro, as of an hour ago. . . but it’ll be a spell before my head is unpacked.

Quick question:  I like the term “Hampton Roads” to described that water bordered by cities that include Norfolk, Hampton, Newport News, etc.  It reminds me of the term I take credit for, “the sixth boro.”  How did “Hampton Roads” originate?  Why isn’t it “Norfolk Roads” or “X roads” with another locality lending its name?  Why did “Staten Island Roads” or some such never take root here?  Just wondering.

Aqua diamonds here means anchored tugs;  only  Miriam Moran is moving.    It’s Sunday morning around 0900.

Now . .  48 hours later the harbor escapes dormancy:  blue is passenger vessels, green is cargo vessels, and red is tankers.

Monday by 1100 APL Sardonyx re-enters a fairly deserted port to complete her transactions;  she had left port Saturday evening before dark . . . as seen in third map here.

Ditto MV Azuma Phoenix;  she was here at GMD Bayonne Friday, went to sea, and returned Monday afternoon.  Foto thanks to John Watson.

Celebrity Summit also entered port on Monday morning . . .  one or two days later than usual.  Did her passengers enjoy a day or two extra as they rode out the storm?  I’d love to hear their stories.  Will the passengers that loaded on Monday lose time on their cruise?

Tuesday morning Maria J pushes a work barge out the east end of the KVK. Is this the crew repainting the VZ Bridge?   That project also needed to be dismantled in the uncertain face of Irene.

All manner of tankers got moved into the docks this morning, like Stealth Haralambos, unusual here that assist is provided by two different companies:  Miriam Moran and McAllister’s Resolute.

One blimp (heading for the US Open Tennis?) moves in from an unusual direction overtop Evening Mist, Barney Turecamo, Austin Reinauer and Stephen-Scott Reinauer.

Box ships come and go, like Zim Shanghai and Camellia as well as tugs Maurania III,  Elk River, and the ones already named.

And all the Tuesday fotos were taken in about a half hour!

Has anyone seen a description of the rebooting of NYC’s transit system in the other five boros?

All fotos by Will Van Dorp except the one credited to John Watson.  and did I miss these, pointed out by Rick Old Salt?

Here was Random  . . . August 2010.

Identify this?

And here, pushing barge John Blanche?

An unidentified sloop trails a self-assured looking Susan E.  Witte.

Lots of coordination gets Mangarella into Bayonne GMD, with Amy C, Ellen, and  Resolute;   John P. Brown escorts the door.

Norasia Alya makes its way into Global with help from Resolute and Ellen.

Stolt Bobcat (ex-Golden Legend) heads for sea as

crew snap some fotos of the receding Manhattan skyline, wondering what they didn’t see and who they didn’t meet.

Miriam Moran, indefatigeable  (and clearly “tireless”), sheet over the bow, travels to a paid asignation.   Ventura sails northeast between Robbins Reef and the Lady.

Your caption here for the foto below: ________

Maersk Barry anchors in smooth waters off the construction site that is the Battery.  Click here to see Barry in a turbulent Bay of Biscay.

Stena President transfers fluids at the dock in Bayonne.

Here’s more of that first shot:  Orange Blossom, transporting my favorite drink.    For another juice carrier post, click here.

Kraken?

Finally, about foto #2 above, it’s a first sign perhaps of the Kirby purchase of K-Sea;  tug is push boat Irene Frazier built by Kirby.  Irene will be replacing K-Sea’s Caspian Sea pushing John Blanche.  Many thanks to silverbk for the heads up.  Also thanks to John Watson for fotos of Mangarella and Norasia Alya . ..  and their associate escorts.

All other fotos by Will Van Dorp.

In case you’re wondering, I hope to puzzle more through the ghost ships soon.

Some great pics of a self-unloading Oldendorff bulker, Sophie, come our way thanks to John Watson, from his perch high above the sixth boro.  Alice has been around recently as well. 

Sophie delivered salt, since we don’t know how many times winter will resurrect before summer comes.. 

I’m not sure what procedure Siteam Adventurer expected to undergo, but she seems unusually positioned.

Many thanks to John for these fotos.

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My job . . . Summer 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

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Seth Tane American Painting

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My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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