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Really random . . . starts with this foto thanks to Maureen Cassidy-Geiger.  More of hers to come, fotos of other waters directly accessible FROM the sixth boro of NY and NJ.  This foto of unidentified cruiser and tug was off Livorno, Italia.   Hmmmm . . . maybe we need a new government agency with initials SBNYNJ . . . another place to get permits from and provide studies for . . . hmmm   NAH!!

Here’s a closer up.  Might it be the tug  seen in this youtube?  Here’s an article about some new Robert Allan designed tugs in that port.

Next two fotos from Bill Whateley showing a tug delivering a crane barge off the island of

Spinalonga east of Iraklion, Crete.  Bill usually blogs about the South Devon coast.

Moving into the waters that ARE the sixth boro . . . Elk River and Peter F Gellatly cater to the needs of Carnival Glory at the Manhattan passenger terminal.

McKinley Sea pushes northbound along the Manhattan from the GW, and

–a foto thanks to Captain Zizes–Ross Sea eastbound towards the disused Manhattan banana piers on the East River aka tidal strait, and in roughly the same location,

Beaufort Sea yesterday headed under the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges and into the Brooklyn Navy Yard, and

Margaret Moran southbound last week headed southbound after assisting Universal Amsterdam with raw cane crystals for my “unprocessed”  friend “sugar,”  while

a miniscule white ball line (?) tug pushes Islip tug Barbara Ann in the Harlem River recently, and

Atlantic Salvor was tailed by a sailboat when Blue Marlin lingered in pre-load mode.

Thanks to Maureen, Bill, and Justin for some of these fotos.  All others by Will Van Dorp.  If you wish to share what you spot in exotic places–all accessible from the sixth boro because of the miracle of water–I’m happy to post.

Off topic:  last night northbound near Haverstraw Bay, I crossed path with –I believe–southbound steam yacht Cangarda.  Meeting this vessel around midnight in a wide, dark, calm part of the river almost seemed like an encounter in a dream, a pleasant hallucination.   Has anyone spotted her southbound on the Hudson this week?  If so, I’d love to put up your fotos;  grainy fotos I don’t like to use. . . . sorry.  Here’s a TV news report from last week about Cangarda.

 . . . or triplets.  How much can you identify about these three eastbound units?  Doubleclick enlarges fotos.Margaret Moran squares off with the bright orange Michele Jean,

semi-concealed Atlantic Salvor and Miss Gill,

Mary Gellatly and Colorado-registered Crow’s Nest, Blue Curaçao Citrus and Miller Girls,

near-twin Vane Brothers boats,

several pairs, very roughly speaking, near the Narrows,

Nicole Leigh and Davis Sea,

a pair of deckhands enjoying springtime on Eddie R,

and a pair of early-Cold War Ford tractors at a plowing party.   

Happy Cinco de Mayo.  All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

or maybe I should call this “windy saturday 2,” because as I watched the merciless wind from a shelter on the “cliff,” Kyle Stubbs felt it from the water.  All fotos today come thanks to his efforts.  Merci merci.

And these first two fotos, perfectly complement (as in andouille to crawfish-boil)  Bowsprite’s recent Jumbolaya post here.    It’s the dredge Atchafalaya, named for the great Cajun river and region. (Treat yourself to the 7.5-minute video at that link:  great cuisine, music, accents, and swampscapes .)

Atchafalaya first splashed into the water way up in St. Paul MN in 1980, quite a journey from its namesake.

Recall how gusty Saturday was:  additional assist work is needed, as in yesterday’s foto of James Turecamo standing by Pati T. Moran.  Here Brendan Turecamo waits at Robbins Reef Light to

tie in.

Ditto here as Mary Gellatly assists Quantico Creek and Doubleskin 39, like a refusing-to-huddle mass under a dramatic sky.

Here decommissioned 65′ harbor tug Swivel shuttles between Governor’s Island and Lower Manhattan.

And finally, harbinger of fotos coming tomorrow, Spirit of America defies the winds as it heads for St. George.

Again, many thanks to Kyle Stubbs for sending along these fotos.

My parting question:  which company now operates Atchafalaya?  Or . . is that a Crowley “C” on the stack?

And with all these Cajun and pre-Mardi Gras  references, check out the blog of a local Brasilian Carnival expert here.   Laissez les bons temps rouler.     And for the young at heart, watch Robert J. Flaherty’s Louisana Story here, for authentic life in Atchafalaya Country.

Featured many times on this blog:  McAllister Responder (ex-Exxon Empire State, Empire State) launched in 1967 in Jacksonville.  Note the deckhand’s communication.  If my info is correct, then ghosts

live there today.  Here’s a haunting timeline and set of b/w fotos.  That’s tanker Lian An Hu in the background.

Weeks tug Robert (ex-Emily S, 1982) stands by Crane Barge 532 in midstream off the Financial District, awaiting more “erosion mats.”

Austin Reinauer (1978, ex-Mobil 5, Morania No. 1, Tamarac) heads across from the KVK toward Erie Basin.

Jill Reinauer (1967, ex-Ranger)  southbound past Ellis Island, the place the Lenape knew as Kioshk . . . or Gull Island.

Peter F. Gellatly (delivered just over a year ago)  heads in the same direction as Jill Reinauer.

Eagle Service (ex-Grant Candies, 1996) and crabber Alexa J off the wintry dunes of  “Konstapel’s Hoeck.”

Jakobson-built, 1967   Ruby M, ex-Texaco Fire Chief, pushing fuel barge Fire Island.  Now if you didn’t know this to be the name of local geography, wouldn’t such a name as “fire island” make you nervous?

Lincoln Sea, used to be blue, anchored off Red Hook a few days ago.  Off to the left, Moran barge Massachusetts anchors.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

New twin house arrangement with complex logo on forward/back stacks?

Nah!  Just Patapsco assisting Peter F. Gallatly with turn to port while backing off the dock.  Note the twin circlers in the sky with one witness.

Peter (94′ x 34′ x 14′ and 4200 hp)  was launched three years after Patapsco (96′ x 34′ x 15 and 4200 hp) ;  hull 141 to Patapsco’s 124.  And the barge is blue-house GCS 238.

Looking at shapes, just basic externals, I’d call Peter F the 16th Vane Brothers vessel of that class.

Two peas

in a pod; yellow

stripe among green.  At least for now.

Jed caught this foto even more recently, blue-house GCS 235 moved on the hip by green stripe by Sassafras (90′ x 32′ 13′ and 3000 hp) built at Chesapeake Shipbuilding.

Green with blue and yellow . . . almost like courtship this spring.  Foto was taken at the head of Gowanus Bay.  Ship in the background was subject of post a month back;  foto then also taken by Jed.

All fotos, except the last one by Jed, by Will Van Dorp.

Late December featured the second post on dredging and more; here’s the latest installment.  At first glance, Baltic Dawn seems about to lose its stern to an oversize bucket (or at least get a machine’s version of a butt pinch), but

–no–it was just an illusion.

All progressed well with this project not far from mid-channel in the KVK in front of Atlantic Salt until

MSC Carla approached from the west and Peter F. Gellatly approached from the east.  Whether the sudden plume of black exhaust resulted from reversing the ship’s engine full or not, I

can’t say, but the dredging continued, as did the journeys of container ship and tug with barge on hip.  This MSC Carla (ex-HanJin Long Beach) dates from 1986; a former MSC Carla, built in 1972, cracked in half in 1997.

Meanwhile , trailing suction hopper Padre Island crisscrossed the water in front of Stapleton.  There’s lots going on beneath the dredger, but  very

very little to see from the surface, except hoses running into the water, port, starboard, and possibly trailing from the stern.  I imagine it like a vacuum cleaner transiting a carpet.

I’d love to hear from someone working on Padre Island and willing to explain more of the working below this vessel.

Dredges … mechanical bottom feeders, bringing up dirt, literally.  They’re time traveling too, uncovering silt of many past events.  Be they adventures or misadventures, the act disturbs the memory of the watershed, you could argue;  in exchange, they make way for a modified future.

All fotos taken today by Will Van Dorp.

It’s been over a half year since I played voyeur at a docking, so I was happy when I got to watch Minerva Eleonora sally in recently, following Mary Gellatly. Note Laura K. to port and Doris Moran to starboard.

Once Laura K. controls most forward momentum, Doris cuts around the stern

and makes to.

Shore crew catching lines await behind some unambiguously inhospitable signage

When signals are clear, Laura K. puts her 5100 hp into pushing,

shoving Eleonora toward the dock,

with utmost control, pinning the tanker.  Note Laura K. prop froth extending most of the way across the KVK.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Full disclosure:  I spent an hour yesterday and an hour today in the area between Piers 66 and 90, i.e., Krevey’s and the Passenger Terminal.  If I didn’t say this, you’d wonder why the light looks different.  So any idea what’s happening in this  start  foto?  That is the Hoboken Terminal tower across the river, and those are tools dangling on line lanyards, a really good idea you know if you’ve ever worked over water.  I can’t count the screwdrivers I lost overboard as I worked on planking of a wooden boat some years back until I “discovered” this solution.

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Ok, so it’s head rig.  Bent  (did it strike one?) dolphin striker and figurehead . . . which vessel?

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The one and only.  Marlon Brando worked here, and so did  . .  uh . .  some racier pirates.

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By early August Bounty will start a European tour.  See the schedule here.  

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 Here Mary Gellatly  maneuvers a bunker barge away from .  . . .

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Peace Boat (ex-Starship Oceanic and Big Red Boat 1).

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Not unusual, some vestige of its previous lives remains.  Can you make out the previous port of registry?

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Nassau.  Below is one of the megayachts  (Can you think of another name for this vast assemblage of floating stuff?) in the sixth boro.  Earlier this week I missed Le Grand Bleu,  although this foto comes from Jed. There are three “tenders” on her starboard side, but have you EVER seen a sailboat, mast stepped!!, as tender on a yacht?

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Yesterday I caught Lady Christine.  Readers/commenters compared one of Bart’s recent finds, a similar yacht, to . . .  a small power tool for personal “hedge” trimming?  Can you imagine what such a yacht looks like in the body shop getting re-painted?  If you can’t imagine, check here.  

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Given all this transient traffic, it’s always therapeutic then to see the venerable McAllister Responder or . . . 

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keeping its distance over on the other side, Cheyenne.  Use the upper left search box to find many previous fotos of Responder and Cheyenne on this blog.  

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All fotos . . .  by Will Van Dorp, except Jed’s, for which I am grateful.

Remember . . . I might not post tomorrow because the  Appalachian Trail … or some such . . . beckons.

I won’t dredge up this heavy eloquence of Melville’s “November in the soul,” but I can attest that today I witnessed the cure to “gloomy June.”  And it is:  a hike and a ride around the Upper Bay.  All manner of friendly gestures did their best to bring cheer.  Like Baltic Sea and the two lighthouses, one black/white and the other green/gray.  Oh yes, she was a lighthouse once!

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Hornbeck’s Atlantic Service . . . call it a bone in her teeth if you want, but I saw it as sweet fizzy water to a thirsty man.

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Sludge tanker Red Hook.  Yeah . . . New Yorkers, every one of us including the Mayor, as fertilizer producers ..  that always makes me chuckle.

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Michigan Service, another Hornbeck boat . . . just looks like good energy.

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Maas Trader in Red Hook Container Port, shuttling between Brooklyn plus other eastern ports and points on the island of Hispanola.   Maybe someone who was nearer by got a better foto?  No matter . . . I know there was excitement over there that I’ll hear of later.

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Peter F. Gellatly, a mere youngster among boats in the Bay.

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Potomac not quite two years off the ways . . . . and already immortalized in Bowsprite’s sketchbook.

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Jack Newman, a Great Lakes Dock and Dredge boat.  More on Jack Newman and other GLDD vessels and toothy tools tomorrow.

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So I fail to understand the mechanisms at play, but this day on the bay –overcast as it was–chased away the “gloomy Junies.” By Saturday I might feel prepared for the mermaid invasion.

200,000 + . . . . that’s  the number of hits this blog has registered since November 2006.  Thank you for reading and telling your friends to check out the site.  We bloggers  get a $10 bill from the Madoff Fund for each hit we register, right?

A little more than 1 . . . . that’s the number of days left for you to EBay bid on an utterly delightful dinner with Bowsprite and Tugster as part of a Mary Whalen fundraiser.

All fotos . . . unfortunately . . . by Will Van Dorp.

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