You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘food’ category.

If you’re going to the market event in Manhattan today, look for signs like this, painted what must be Ceres

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

blue.  This is the west end of the Brooklyn Navy Yard, closest to Vinegar Hill.   Beyond the East River there, protruding into the sky to the right, that’s the empire State Building.   Ceres has arrived, and

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

on schedule!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Inside this warehouse, I picked up my order of Ricker Hill Orchards vinegar and Champlain Valley Apiaries  honey.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Excuse the poor quality foto.  Could someone explain the dried (?) birds’ wings?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

There was seaweed . . .

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

pumpkins,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

wild artichokes,   and much much more.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Agger Fish–right next to the warehouse–was a sponsor of the Brooklyn event, as were Brooklyn Grange, triple island, and Marlow & Daughters.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Morgan O’Kane played, parents shopped and talked, and and kids danced.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

If you’re local and  have time, get down to the New Amsterdam Market today . . . on the opposite side of the river here.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Congratulations to Erik and the team for a very big accomplishment.  Although there’s lots of work left this season, season two starts up soon.   Here’s some preliminary info on the vessel, which was modified in the construction. In case you’re wondering . . . Erik’s estimate is that Ceres sailed only about twenty percent of the trip.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who alone is responsible for any errors in reporting.

Here, here, and here are my previous Ceres posts.   Last but not the least least . . . it’s bowsprite’s rendering.  Here’s the NYTimes version.

Vermont Sail Freight . . . south bound.  Click here for their ports of call and dates.   More fotos courtesy of Fred Wehner.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I’m eager to see them with masts stepped and sails billowing.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

If anyone wishes to contribute fotos of the vessel making her way south and calling at ports headed south, please get in touch.


Is it a vestige of a past whoseOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

artifacts are mostly

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

disappearing?  Or

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

is it an enterprise of

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

what is

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

to come?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Read how the Danes and Dutch already do it.  These Dutch from Tres Hombres wanted to sail into the sixth boro last year but were stymied by red tape.   Then there’s the Vermont working sailcraft project discussed here.  Andrew Wilner has more examples in his blog here.   Here’s a veritable bibliography of hybrid sail ideas.

Working Harbor Committee presents a panel discussion of this topic tonight from 6 pm — 9 pm in Manhattan.    Click here for details.

All fotos here by Will Van Dorp.  The disintegrating sailboat fotos were taken near Bear Mountain last weekend, and the Black Seal three-masted schooner fotos date from when it delivered 20 tons of cocoa beans to Red Hook in June 2011.   Here and here are related blog posts I did back then.

 

I heard that whales frolicked out in the Ambrose this morning.  Maybe they too felt their hearts quicken as Bebe approached.   My bebe’s back!!

Bebedoura, that is.  And with the orangest-orange lifeboats!

Bebe . . .  it used to be someone else, but now it’s you.  Only you can make the sunshine so sweet in February.

Dancing to starboard, then to port.  Bebe . . . the sight of you makes me so glad

it makes me want to hook up . . . right here, no matter how inappropriate.   Oil and

juice don’t mix, I know.  I’ll wait and bask under the perfect sky.

But soon enough, these couplings will be engaged and the sweetest nectar will flow.

Ok ok . . . let me scale it back.  Bebedouro is a municipality in Sao Paulo state renowned for the orange juice industry.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

And yes, whales did frolic in the Ambrose this morning.   I am looking for a word derivation of Bebedouro.  When I first saw it, I imagined a permutated “hard baby,” but then I caught a drift of drinking gold . . .   although my online translator also comes up with “ouro” as to make crazy . . . as in baby, you make me crazy!  But I realize now I’ve gone way far overboard.

Check out this gallery of fruit juice tankers that ply the oceans . . . maybe making the sea mammals go crazy.

Today, in honor of all the wings folks will eat while watching balls move in various ways so that gold can enter the coffers of burly boys calling themselves patriots and equally burly ones calling going by “giants,” and inspired by bowsprite’s clarity and conciseness on the subject of balls, I thought to reflect on them myself.

British Mazel, moved here by Elizabeth McAllister,  has one white ball up high that seems to exist as a major node in the vessel’s nervous system.

A full- and a half-ball serve

the same function high atop Affinity, on the arm here of Marion Moran.

USCGC Seneca WMEC-906 sports a communication ball as well, and then some

others, including one that’s slit, serve other mission functions.

My field notes include appearance of more balls–three of them–and in unexpected places, such as these on a pleasure cat.

Explorer of the Seas has four.  Lacking bowsprite’s clarity and self-assurance, I’ll hazard a guess that ball quantity might vary directly proportional to crew size.

Ball color might relate to artistic intention, which could trigger a cease-and-desist.

Just as with the arcane rules of football, the ball code mystifies me here . . . uh . . . Artemis of Ephesus comes to mind here, or the fecund tomato plant that I’ve never had in my urban window garden?

The good folks in Detroit seem to have the right idea . . .  make them gold.  Put your local sports jersey on the statue.  I’m sure that golden “ball” perforated by golden rods here . .  is really a prolate spheroid.

I’ve failed to bring clarity to this topic, as bowsprite so artfully did.  I’ll go on with my observations and quantifications.  Spare me the entertainment and singers.  Pass the wings, please.  Lucas Oil Stadium . . . that’s along the KVK, right?

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

#1 was here.

It’s June.  Might you be suffering from hypoclupea . . .  deficiency of herring?    Read what the celebrated neurologist Oliver Sacks writes about treatment here, as published in the New Yorker two years ago.  Hypoclupea can leave you blase, bleached, apathetic . . .

dried out . . . as Miss Callie herself is feeling these days.  To see Miss Callie in her element among the fishes, click here.

Even on Coney Island, the painting near the boardwalk looks off because this siren has taken to eating . . . @#@!  dogs, and they’re not even hot.

Go fishing . . . whether you use bunker for bait and catch your own, or just

exchange cash or credit at the nearest purveyor of “new catch holland herring,”  and you’ll find your zest for life just

returns!    You might even end up seeing mermaids without having to go to the latest Depp/Disney show.

All fotos by will Van Dorp, who has lots of unrelated odds and ends and who just might not post tomorrow.

A herring-eaters blog

Translated info on the fleet at  a “loggers” festival in Vlaardingen on the Rhine this weekend.  “Logger” in Dutch is “lugger” in English.

From Uglyships’ Bart, here’s a video on an uneventful loading of  the loading of 15! tugs onto SSHLV Fjell in Singapore bound for Maracaibo via Cape Town.  Here’s a Reuters article on same.

And finally, last but not least, you’ll see a new image of “tugster” on the upper left side of this blog; click on the image and you’ll see part of an article that appeared in Jack Tar Issue #5.  Watercolor is by Herb Ascherman of Cold is the Sea blog.  Another great example of his work is cover on Jack Tar #5.

Finally, if you find yourself in Manhattan Saturday, look to the water:  I know of at least one swim around the island race going on.  New York has enthusiastic swimmers!

Happy solstice!

Using what’s stowed in this vessel and the one from two days back–Black Seal–you’d have “fixins” for lots of

banana splits.  To ensure these tropical foods arrive in prime condition, stow those bananas properly on this reefer.  All manner of stowing advice comes your way from Stowmasters.

What impressed me, though, since I could observe it, was the quick tie up and turn around:  Albermarle Islandapproaches the dock at 8 a.m. with assistance from Brendan Turecamo and Margaret Moran, who

ease the vessel sideways.  Slowly and

steadily.  Crew on the ship and the dock make lines

fast.

By 8:20, it’s “all fast” and the tugs move to the next job.  Less than 10 hours later, Albermarle Island has headed out the Narrows bound for sea and Europe.

I’m left wondering about the story of these bananas in both the weeks before and after this docking.  Here’s a start.   Bowsprite drew a sister of Albermarle here, and I  wrote about the previous generation of reefer vessels in the sixth boro over three years ago here.  Anyone know what happened to the smaller “Ocean” class, and why the “Island” class calls at Red Hook rather than Howland Hook?

All fotos here by Will Van Dorp, who wrote about shipment of another commodity here.

The solstice happens in a week.  Is your household ready, mobilized.  Can you safely take it out onto the highways and wetways?

Thoughts of anything but summer . . .  with its adventures and gallivants . .. are elusive, for me.  Dana Spiotta writes of that in tomorrow’s NYTimes magazine, recounting a voyage on the Erie Canal by rowboat with Tide and Current Taxi‘s very own Marie Lorenz.    You could go fishing:  both Marlin and Minnow are currently in the sixth boro.

You could just go sit by the water and see all there’s to see.  I saw a classic loon yesterday–who dove before I could snap evidence.  This Corsair passed more slowly, less skittishly.

A week from now you could swim around Manhattan . . . or volunteer to keep swimmers safe by emailing cweber@nyc.org

You could swallow new herring and gin.  Here’s more info.

In a week you could go to the Clearwater Festival.

This foto from last year comes from Yen.  I know where, like these monks, I’m going . . . .

Next Saturday . . . the sea will again boil with hot blood and creatures rarely seen will emerge and parade.  It’s  the 29th

annual Mermaid Parade and Ball!!!

Thanks, Yen, for that foto.

Unrelated but priority . . . don’t know if this is real:  Colvin schooner on beach for sale for $15000

I quote from gcaptain:  “According to AP Moller, the parent company of Maersk Lines, a single 20-foot vessel container on average can hold about 48,000 bananas. In theory then, Emma Maersk is capable of holding nearly 528 million bananas [aka 11,000 teu] in a single voyage – enough to give every person in Europe or North America a banana for breakfast.”    So I wondered . . . if Emma and sisters carry that number of bananas, then

CMA CGM White Shark = 243 million bananas,

Ital Lirica – 244.3,

Port Said – 82.03 . . . .   and

MSC Linzie – 242.3

There you have it, a new measure for container ships, the banana.  It’s right out there waiting to catch on  . .  like smoots, donkeypower, helens, and  hedons.

All fotos recently by Will Van Dorp.  Thanks to gcaptain for bringing up the banana idea.  Now would those be Cavendish bananas, plantains, or something else?

Guest fotographer #1 here is John Watson.  He caught this foto of Orange Sun with my favorite cargo last week, less than an hour before I stopped by the Kills; Laura K provides the assist.  Some previous orange juice vessels have appeared here and here.    And here’s my first, Orange Star.

John has been shooting sixth boro ships much longer than I have, and I look

forward to more collaboration with him soon.  Above bulker is Tai Bai Hai . . . and below is GencoSuccess.

Richard Wonder sent along the fotos of YM Efficiency from the Bayonne Bridge last week.  Here he takes a turn at

MOL Paramount, getting a turn around Bergen Point with

assist from Responder and Ellen, who’ve

appeared here countless times.  That’s Port Elizabeth in the background.  Click here for a foto of MOL Paramount mounted high and dry in a floating drydock.

John and Richard . . . thanks much.

Check out this eBay ad for Q. A. Gillmore, a 1913 tug with functioning steam engine power.  I’m NOT going to bid although I might be interested in partnering.  The clock is ticking.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 404 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments? Email Tugster

My job . . . Summer AND Fall 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

Archives

free web page hit counter
October 2014
M T W T F S S
« Sep    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 404 other followers