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Sunrise to the left of Coney Island Light and tug Escort, a Jakobson boat.  Note how calm the water is.

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The mighty Resolute passing the lofty Chesapeake Coast, with a loftier tower off in the distance.

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James Turecamo–a Matton boat– tailing Stolt Aquamarine

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Gulf Dawn with GL 54

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Escort six hours after the lead foto . .  notice what 22+ knot wind out of the west does.  That’s Taft Beach disappearing  behind the island.

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And Potomac heads eastbound.  I’m thinking to use Robbins Reef light as the terminal punctuation for all posts this week.  Do you remember these signs that used a product name in the same way?  I’m gathering if you are over 55 and a US resident, you’ll know about Burma Shave.  Otherwise, you’ll think I’ve lost it again.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp, this morning.

And check out this Staten Island Advance story on Robbins Reef light rehab work, featuring my foto!

More accurately . . . I could call this “off Duty’s starboard,” as all this traffic passed Duty in a 45-minute period while she was herself “off duty” and on the hook in Gravesend Bay.   Less than 24 hours after I took these fotos, Duty raised the hook and sailed off south.

Two years back I snapped this foto of Duty out of the notch.   Here, if you doubleclick to enlarge the foto below, you can see two smudges on the horizon, one on either side.  Currently off Duty‘s starboard is a dredger . . . probably Padre Island.  Off her port is a Zim container ship.

And something astern of that . . . and

that!

Zim Tarragona is a regular in the sixth boro, although I’ve possibly never posted/identified a foto of her.

Following her is this array, and

outbound, meeting her is MSC Pilar, now Europe-bound.

Together those two vessels carried a lot of containers . . .

Next into the Narrows and meeting MSC Pilar are APL Garnet and a ketch (?) named Bee, about which I know nothing.

Pilar (okay . . . I just like that name) moves under the Bridge at 13 knots . . .

And as they move into the Upper Bay, APL Garnet and Bee meet

Histria Gemma, a sister of whom I included here some six months back.

All this traffic went unnoticed by this fisherman, who . . . by the way . . .  caught nothing from the depths either.

Next vessel in was the speedy Atlantic Compass, itself carrier of some mighty interesting cargoes.

And the final vessel of this 45-minute flurry of traffic . . . . Bow Clipper, previously featured here.  Out beyond Bow Clipper is the slope where the ‘scapegoats do roam.  Click here for a sense of her own roamings.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who  . . . during all this traffic, was wondering what was happening on Duty.

What I’ve ben reading lately?  Check out the Arthur Kill deepening project/blasting as negotiated by NYTugmaster here.

Happy 5th anniversary and the demise of Oriental Nicety at Oil-Electric here.

And how does a wind turbine blade arrive in Gloucester?  Check out Joey’s blog here.

Finally . . . from the NYTimes, a new museum in Antwerp looking like shipping containers here.

Na Hoku (“stars”  in Hawaiian) 1981, ex-Chris Candies.  Sunset Park in the background.

Aegean Sea 1962 (ex-Francis  E. Roehrig, Jersey Coast, John Barker) Greenpoint in the background.  Click here for more Huxley Envelope/East River shots.

Peter F. Gellatly.  Delivery exactly two years ago, 17 November, 2009.  Leaving Newark Bay and headed into the KVK, eastbound.

James Turecamo 1969.

Miriam Moran 1979  on Citron   2007   bow.  James Turecamo westbound.

Kimberly Turecamo 1980  (ex-Rebecca P.) and Serifos 1995   named for an Aegean Sea island.

Duty 2006  headed south for another load of coal.

Margaret Moran 1979 assists Ital Moderna 2008.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who’s looking for fotos of Eldia, as she was towed from Cape Cod into the Kills and ultimately Witte’s yard in the mid-1980s.  Eldia blew ashore at Orleans in a spring storm 1984 (Click here to see how photogenic she was thought to be on the beach.) and ultimately was towed to Rossville.   Someone out there MUST have fotos of her as “dead ship” coming into sixth boro waters.

Please vote as often as they allow for tugster Village Voice web awards.  Read the directions upper left and click on the icon. And  . .  thanks!

Doubleclick enlarges most fotos.  From a distance, I knew the profile was unfamiliar.  Note Neptune‘s  outside controls on either

side of the house.

Laura K Moran, seen here dozen of times, assists Athens Star into the pier.

Consort delivers

coal.

Maryland heads westbound into the KVK.

Christian Reinauer sidles up to

RTC 145.

CMA CGM White Shark inbound for Newark Bay passes Seaborn and gets

escorted in by Gramma Lee T Moran.

Speaking of escorts, here tug by that name heads for sea and for more coal.

Not an impressive foto, but I’ve not previously seen ATB Corpus Christi, here with PetroChem Supplier.

All fotos today by Will Van Dorp.

No news on the Colvin schooner ashore on Fire Island, although plans are converging to attempt getting her off.

I thought you spelled it “okracoke,” as in cherry coke,” caffeinated but slightly more viscous and less fruity, she said.

Names and spelling change less frequently than shoals and shorelines.  Local Indians called the place “wokokkon” and who knows what Verrazano and Raleigh called it.  And Blackbeard . . . people originally called him  Captain Drummond before he took on a string of noms de corsair.

I photographed this 1970 National Geographic map where it was posted aboard ferry Carteret, since it shows my birthplace (Belhaven) and its proximity to both inlets at Ocracoke and Hatteras.  My father had imagined buying farmland inland from Swan Quarter;  now I’m thinking it’s a place for me to retire, whenever that becomes possible.

The yellow pickup on the foredeck carries a supply of wheel chocks.  Intermodal shipping with trucks on decks:  bowsprite should love this.

The 24-vessel ferry system also hosts an ongoing water monitoring effort called Ferry Mon.  In a separate strand of multitasking, ferry crews keep a lookout for marine life in distress.

Midpoint in the trip between Cedar Island and Ocracoke we crossed southbound

ferry Pamlico.

Note the two-floor passenger cabin.  Carteret was launched from Halter Equitable, the same yard that launched the sixth boro’s tug Aegean Sea and ferries Barberi and Newhouse.

Chincoteague has its ponies, and Ocracoke has its “bankers.”

We traveled from the north end of Ocracole to Hatteras aboard Croatoan.  Note the Fedex truck.

As we crossed Hatteras Inlet, we saw three small fishing boats inbound

hurrying to the dock with a catch.

Long and narrow with lots of  sheer, the boats resemble

New England lobster boats, although these “banks” boat have less beam, sharp chines, and smaller houses.

Can anyone identify the fish?

Midpoint in the trip between Ocracoke and Hatteras we were tailed by small fishing boats and

crossed southbound ferry FriscoPatti-built like the tug Duty.  I’d love to see a foto of Frisco hauled.

Let’s call it quits here.  More “road fotos” tomorrow.

All fotos here by Will Van Dorp.

Meanwhile, unrelated, how long do you imagine a powerboat would take between Hatteras and NYC?  Your guess?  Now watch this youtube on the consumption of 600 gallons of fuel.

Unrelated:  What happened to the vessel recently removed from the James River ghost fleet?  Read about it here.

And finally, here from Robert of Oil-Electric is an article about last summer’s whales … and an elephant, ladybug, and rails.

Part 1 of this series looked like this.  Now more.

Madeline, 2008

Duty, 2006

Lindsey, 1989

Brandywine, 2006

More Lindsey

More Duty.

More Madeline.

More Brandywine, and Amberjack and Bold.

Of course Brandywine ranges far and wide, and these days, maybe so does Inland Sea heading south here from the Ben Franklin Bridge.

All fotos last week by Will Van Dorp.

Note:  Since I overdo the links sometimes, the two most important background ones here and this on the China Tea Trade and this on the China clippers.

I start this post with five older fotos; the one below showing crew tidying up lines on McAllister Responder dates from January 2007.   Until now, I’ve always focused on the foreground, not the background.  Of course, all those blue warehouses are now being replaced by Brooklyn Bridge Park.

Another example–Francis E. Roehrig (now Aegean Sea but ex-Jersey Coast and John C. Barker and as Francis E. a hero post-Bouchard accident) has always been focus of this foto for me rather than what’s in the background.

Again, I’ve focused until now on the foreground, on the 140′ icebreaking tug Sturgeon Bay instead of on the rich architecture of Brooklyn Heights,

in summertime obscured by a jungle of foliage, making it easier to focus of East River traffic like Express Marine’s Duty, below.  However, what I learned last week is that Brooklyn Heights has fascinations all

its own.  Like this house standing on Pierrepont Place, the house of Abiel Abbot Low, son of Seth Low of Salem, Massachusetts.   A. A. Low moved to Brooklyn Heights after spending six years in Canton’s markets dealing with Wu Bingjian aka Howqua.    From Brooklyn Heights, Low could observe

the goings and comings of his fleet of China clippers over at South Street when it was a seaport in the years between the First and Second Opium Wars.  Finding out more about the Lows ( and in subsequent generations their connections to the mayor of Brooklyn, Columbia University and FDR . . . ) those are adventures and work that lie ahead.  Last week I learned that what’s in the background might as well be an interesting focus as what is background.

Meanwhile . . . the drum calls to Coney Island, with the parade just four days off.  Here and here are links for 2009; first and second for 2008.  More tomorrow.  Plan to be in Coney on Saturday?

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Each week the New Yorker runs one new cartoon lacking a caption.  People send in their cleverness, and the winner is announced a few weeks later along with that week’s new caption contest.  But when Joel Milton sent this foto yesterday, it seemed to me a perfect image to launch a tugster caption contest.  The prize . . . recognition of your wit among your peers?  A free one-year subscription to tugster?

So, have at it.  Some background  (or dry ground in this case):  this “slip” is located between Queens and Manhattan in the East river.  The island is officially Belmont Island, but some–like me–prefer to call it U Thant Island, named for the United Nations Secretary General, who used to see it right across the stream from the UN buildings. Ironically, the speedster seems to have parked right under an arch shown in foto #2 of this very old tugster post.  Also, doubleclick on the foto to enlarge it, and you’ll see the arch is very popular place for cormorants, known for their voracious appetites, intake,  and therefore output . . . .

Caption??

The Peace Boat was in the sixth boro in June last year.  Yesterday thanks to Mage, who sent me in the direction of  Maritime Matters, I learned that earlier this month, off Yemen, the Peace Boat

outran and escaped from pirates!  Bravo.  That almost calls for a renaming of the vessel.  Any ideas?

The rest of this post is devoted to enigmas.  Like . . . anyone know this monument aka denkmal?  Answer follows.

This drooling clamshell could engulf my car.  Guess the location?

This weather foto–I’ll call the weather stunning if not the foto–makes predictions easy.  Vessel is Escort, moving coal into the Hackensack river.

At the point I took this foto, I had figured out the talent, but initially I rubbed my eyes and panicked about the cruel effects of aging.

And this last foto . . . it’s a family foto and I’m looking to identify the year and make of car.  The man on the left is my great-grandfather, not a citizen of this country, but the foto was taken somewhere in the Dakotas in the 1930s.  Please, make and model?

All fotos except the first and last by Will Van Dorp.  Thanks to Joel for foto and Mage for lead.

The denkmal .  .  is a propeller of Intrepid, the carrier, CV-11.   Which reminds me:  the fleet arrives on Wednesday this week.  And the dredging was happening (seems always to be happening) in the Manhattan Passenger Terminal, where dredging is always happening.

Socrates left the harbor under a golden sunset pulling an empty

Sugar Express;  they headed south from the Yonkers plant (to where?) for a refill.  Who can live the sweet life

without the stuff?  From Florida, as the reader suggests?

Stolt Perseverence, a parcel tanker built in Croatia in 2001, delivers assorted chemicals, escorted by James Turecamo and Marie J Turecamo (?).

I’ve no clue what these vital assorted chemicals might be, or what their journey is.

These mounds get me to work on time:  Express Marine hauls the coal into the PSEG Hudson Generating Station, which provides juice to the Northeast corridor trains.

West Virginia coal

gets Escorted into the sixth boro by this vessel.

Jill Jacob . . . moves global industrial life blood.

There’s so much that does NOT meet the eye and is NOT easily discovered about in/outflow of commodities in the boro.  Of course, petroleum products  and containers dominate, along with an occasional elixir of orange.  Some months back I posted my fantasy about sailing goods into the boro from the agricultural north.  Bowsprite reflects on overlapping ideas  here.

All fotos above were taken this week by Will Van Dorp.

Twas the eve of Christmas Eve, and straight through my many layers of clothes, the wind was howling, starting a process like anesthesia.  Escort came in unescorted or unescorting. . . no money or sport in that!  And no warmth at all did she offer me!

No hesitation or expectation in either party when she passed Zim Haifa or Nordstrength, only a sliver of bow visible.  Big as a vessel like Zim Haifa is, she has only about a third the capacity of the largest boxships now dashing across the oceans.  Witness MSC Danit.

MSC Levina raced in, and a portion of the crew seemed delighted enough to see New York by brilliant sunlight that they ignored the 20 degrees (-6 C) temperature with bone-numbing wind.

I love below freezing light.

Another container ship Maersk Wisconsin came in, and I hope these precariously perched parcels did NOT contain the new paintboxes purchased by a certain presently unplugged painter seeking solace in warmer climes.

Said container ship’s escutcheon contrasts nicely with the orange of E-Balt.

By this time, hypothermia had started to wreak havoc enough with my judgement that I considered this must be a hallucination.

Nope . . . not seeing figments yet.  It’s Jerry, pushing Mr. Upright.  Welcome home.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

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My job . . . Summer AND Fall 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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