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This post still finds me in the southern hemisphere–for a while–but these fotos come from southern US, snapped by a friend who wishes no  credit.

Stange looking Suwannee River?

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Some Crosby tugs . . . Leader, Divinity, Duke, Admiral.

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The only line of C-Tractors . . .  this one the 6.

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And finally, back to Suwannee River, three-quarters view.  She really is 87′ loa x 50.’   That’s big-ass beamy!

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Mariner A. Non Y. O’Mous snapped and shared these.  If you see him today, thank him for me.

At my age . . . I’ve come to some places where –at each–I could spend a lifetime;  choices need to be made.  And if I can’t spend that much time at each, the alternative might be to just keep moving . . . since it’s too hard to figure out how

to get access.  Those do look like parts of the superstructure of USS New York, which makes the Avondale Shipyard over there somewhere.  In the sixth boro, tugboat Dorothy Elizabeth and prison barge Vernon C. Bain come out of Avondale, along with this huge international list.

Bayou Lafourche along 308 sports signs like this, birthplace of lots of Vane Brothers tugs, a Gellatly & Criscione, and several Penn Maritimes.

A couple of twists and turns later, there’s this Bollinger yard, home to the Sentinel-class of Coast Guard cutter.  Consider this, two major US shipyards in a town of  less than 3000!!  Here’s more info on those cutters.

Continue south for 12 miles and you’ll see North American Shipbuilding, one of several Edison-Chouest Offshore facilities.  Provider was delivered in 1999.

Manufacturing and then . . . those are banana “trees.”   And in this tropical waterway, a cornucopia of boats can be found like

Victor J. Curole, (1979)

as well as

Capt. Thuan, (1987)

Squeegee and Sponge,  (turns out they’re oil recovery vessels or were at one time, 1966)

Wyoming, (1940 fishing vessel)

nameless and Big Tattoo,  (1981)

a floating home?

Mia Molloy bow and

stern,

Winds of Change . . . (2002) which appears to have a pusher knee integrated into its bow,

Mr Russell,  (1995)

and I’d love to know more about this one,

Capt. Manuel,  (1982)

this nameless variation on Lil Rip,

lots of dipnetters,

nameless, Carissa Breigh, (1980)  and Junie Bop, (1981)

Lugger Tug,  (maybe 1981)

swarms of swamp fans,

… let me stop here on this post which breaks my record for number of fotos . . .  nameless, but I can almost make out the spelling of TUGSTER on the stern.  Is it possible I’ve found myself and my place to settle here?  She looks to have some pedigree . . . 1940s lines?  Can anyone help with a bit of history here?

Time for tugster  (1952) to stop this trip and contemplate and refresh with some Bayou Teche biere pale . . . .   For more on Bayou Teche, the place, click here.

I intend to return to the Bayou soon, spend more time, and  . . . who knows what might transpire.

All fotos here by either Will or Christina, partners in this jaunt-within-a-gallivant.

For a waterman’s view of the general area, click here.

Here was 10.

And here, from John Van Staalduinen,  are fotos of Legend, a sibling of the virgin tug Liberty I posted about a month ago.  Doubleclick enlarges. The size of this behemoth can

measured using the load line (draft markings) on the stern.  Eyeballing it, I’d say that from the top of the stern bulwarks to the top of the brownish bottom paint is almost 20′.  I.e., if (post-launch obviously) I dove from the bulwarks into the water, it would be a long way just to the water!  ??  Stern anchor is already in place.

Also at the shipyard in Anacortes, John got this foto of a dry-docked Nanuq, a 301′ loa oil recovery/platform supply vessel build by Edison Chouest.  Nanuq was delivered in May 2007; here’s a youtube of its launch.   Click here for a foto/info on the newest vessel Edison Chouest is undertaking for Shell’s Arctic drilling.

And from Isaac of the tugboathunter blog, this foto taken in Toledo. OH, (it reminds me of those shots taken by “future car spies”) of the former tugboat Cleveland, possibly headed for the sixth boro as the new (and third) Patrice McAllister.  Another shot of the future Patrice can be seen in the last foto here on this post from Isaac’s blog.  For archival shots of the vessel, check out Birk and Harold’s site, of course.

Thanks again John and Isaac.

Related:  If you haven’t seen Jed’s blog, Cumberland Soundings, check it out here.

Also related:  I’m suddenly thinking seriously about visiting the Panama Canal.  A site like this one gives me the impression that there is an Canal/shipping enthusiast-friendly tourist infrastructure in Panama.  Can anyone who’s been there comment?  Would it be better to use Panama City or Colon as a homebase for a four-day trip?  The “screen capture” below is interactive but time sensitive.  When I studied traffic just now, I quickly recognized a half dozen vessels I think I know from their transit through the sixth boro.   One is NYK Meteor, which I got fotos of eight days ago exiting the KVK.  Is this possible?

First, you will notice a new icon “button” on the left.  It’s a harborcam for Giglio port with live feed showing salvage efforts.

The last time subs appeared on this blog they were antiques, John P. Holland’s prototypes.  The monochromatic tube below encircled by the unmistakeable yellow/orange Edison Chouest tugs 2, 3, and 4 is as far removed from Holland’s vessel as can be.   The “tube” is SSBN 734 USS Tennessee, returning from sea.  I can imagine the crew will be very happy to exit vessel and get reaquainted with the rythyms of day and night.    By the way, the Edison Chouest tugs here technically double as pilot boats.

Surfaced SSBNs returning from or bound to sea all tend to look alike. 

These fotos were taken in the vicinity of Kings Bay, GA along the St. Mary’s River.   They come compliments of

Capt. John E. Dupee, a Kings Bay pilot, the tallest person on the “sail” below,  and frequent commenter on this blog. Last summer in northern Florida I had the pleasure of meeting  John aka JED, who used to work for K-Sea outa New York. 

Many thanks, JED.

Click here to see fotos from the weekend in 2008 that the sixth boro had TWO subs visit.

Update:  May Day no more at South Street Seaport Museum, and I have sent my benjamins as promised.    As I understand it, the Museum has been “taken over” in some fashion by the Museum of the City of New York.     Below, Peter Stanford addressed a group of “save our seaport” supporters back in May.

Bravo to Save our Seaport for their efforts to pull together support.

Guess what this is?  A clue is this:  I took the foto back in November in Detroit.

This is related.  The Great Lakes are mostly devoid of commercial passenger traffic today, but a century ago, had my great-great grandparents lived and prospered along the “northern coast” of the US, deluxe cruise itineraries might include stops at Buffalo, Cleveland, Detroit.

Here, from the Dossin Museum is a model of what was marketed as THE way to cruise the Great Lakes around the time I was born.  Even the name of the aqua-hulled vessel,

SS Aquarama exudes that age of optimism.  Too bad I hadn’t  started this blog and contracted my obsession a decade or more earlier . . .  I would have been able to photograph her in mothballs in Buffalo.   Although it’s better late than never, when “stuff gets gone, it’s gone.”

So here’s the answer to my “whatzit” question . . . that place of carved oak above is the lounge on one of those Great Lakes passenger vessels:  City of Detroit III.  Who knows what honetmooners, retirees, or other celebrants smoked cigarettes (back when that was thought sophisticated)  and sipped drinks here.

Among the many great people I met this past year was Peter Boucher of Nautical Log.  Peter sent me this foto in response to a foto of Cove Isle, here.  Peter’s explanation of the foto below is as follows:  “When we were on the 1967 Western Arctic Patrol in CCGS Camsell  at one of the river stops this CCG river vessel came out to visit us.  Our Captain renamed it “Dimwit”, as it looked like it was going to turn over at any moment.”  Here’s another shot of Dumit.

I had to include this foto here:  this endless coal train travels along the bottom of the Great Lake called “Lake Maumee.”  Never heard of it?  It was there, though.  The day before Thanksgiving I waited a long time as this slow train moved prehistoric plant material along the bed of this prehistoric lake.

I also had the pleasure of meeting Jed this past year.  Thanks much for the tour of the Jacksonville area.

Blue Marlin captivated me this year, to put it mildly.  Here Clearwater, another worthy project if you’re still toying with year-end donations,  checks it out.

Here’s a foto from January 1, 2011:  Ann Moran glides on clouds beneath a heavenly bridge in charleston, SC.

Finally, it’s a cliche to end with a sunset pic, maybe, but I am so glad that a “cancelled trip” led me to visit Vieques as Plan B.  I’m hoping for more “plan b or even c” gallivants for 2012.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.  I hope to write again from Wilmington, NC.

Previous pilot boat fotos show vessels of Interport Pilots here,  Chesapeake pilots here, Charleston harbor here, Newport here, and New York areas ones here.  Below, Sandy Hook Pilots vessel Yankee heads out two months back when Blue Marlin lingered in the harbor;  on or about August 4 Blue Marlin will return.

The white speck in front of the Yonkers sugar plant is a Hudson River Pilot, operating out of Station Yonkers.   Universal Amsterdam offloads sugar while the nearer vessel, Ocean Titan, prepares to accept a pilot as it heads upriver .

Outside Mayport Naval Station, a pilot steps from the outbound vessel onto the pilot vessel.

St Johns River Bar Pilot heads out to meet an incoming container vessel CSAV Loncomilla.

On the eastern tip of Dodge Island, vessels of Biscayne Bay Pilot wait.

Vessel Biscayne returns to  the station between Miami Beach’s South Pointe Park and Fisher Island.

Vessel below was docked on the Key West waterfront;  this is all I could find on pilot boats here.

Vessels of Schaefer Pilot Transfer Service–Miss Kitty and Betty S--tie up at the shack under the Rte 213 bridge over the C & D Canal.

Scroll thru to see fotos of the launches in service near the end of this link.

…. which brings us back to the sixth boro.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s a 20-year-old article about Sandy Hook pilots from the NYTimes.

From today’s Times, here’s an article about a canoe trip on the Salish Sea and one about a veritable NYC monster, a 200-ton cutterhead in … er . .  under . . .  the town.

Enjoy this wild pilot compilation.  And another.

And here’s a whole blog devoted to pilots.

Beat the heat . ..  by imagining change:  well, eastriver suggested the sixth boro annex the Conch Republic.  Hmmm.  Since the sixth boro is an archipelago like the Keys, maybe we could confederate the American archipelagos (besides the two already mentioned, we’d join with the Thimble Islands, the Thousand Islands, the Channel Islands, the Salish Islands, and maybe establish diplomatic relations with all archipelagos smaller than . . . Long Island, giving us many of the Antilles, a smattering of Pacific nations,  the Aeolian Islands and Greek Islands.   I know I’ve left many out, but it’s already sounding like good company in my heat-addled brain.

Or defocus on the scorching temperatures by looking at fotos below?

First one is a “tugster-sighting” just north of the sixth boro snapped by Joel Milton.  Tugster is on the foredeck of Patty Nolan  (1931) sans figurefigure as she tows sailing vessel sans-servingsails Lickity-Split some weeks back, here passing the Englewood Cliffs boat basin, I believe.

Next foto from John Watson . . . Eddie R (1971) towing a mystery barge.  Any guesses its mission?

Answer comes from Les Sonnenmark, longtime friend of the tugster blog:  it’s a cable-laying barge operated by Calwell Marine.  Info on the barge can be found in this pdf . . . starting on the unnumbered page 6ff.    In fact, this barge may be related to the work of Dolphin III in the sixth boro last summer:  click the link to “marine contractor” above the last foto in this post you find here.

Foto by tugster near the Chesapeake City Bridge as 2011-launched Mako ensures Penn No. 81 makes

its way Chesapeake-bound.  More info on the pilotboat in the background soon.

Foto by Jed of Vickie M McAllister (2001) docked at McAllister’s Blount Island yard on the St John’s River .

Foto by G. Justin Zizes Jr. of Kathleen Turecamo (1968)  and

and Matthew Tibbetts (1969) both high and dry at Caddell Shipyard in Staten Island.

Foto from Lou Rosenberg of Aegean Sea (1962) near Rockaway Inlet.  Aegean Sea used to

be called, in order,  Francis E. Roehrig, Jersey Coast, and John C. Barker.

This yard tug in Mayport seems to have a protection  bar, but in spite of the

the numbers on the stern, I’ve found no info on this type.  Fotos by tugster.  Orange bow on the right side of foto belongs to C-Tractor 13.

A final shot of Patty Nolan and Lickety Split headed upriver.

Thanks to Joel, John, Les, Jed, Justin, and Lou.

Only tangentially related:  For info on YTB-832, previously based in Mayport and now possibly in Greece by way of Italy, click here.

And an even less tenuous tangential connection to these fotos of vessels of  La Guardia di Finanza, which sounds like what our government is supposed to do but actually refers to something quite different . . . .  What it is can be found here.

More fotos will be forthcoming from the Conch Republic, a possible future residence.

A few more fotos from Mayport include LCS-2  USS Independence, which reminds me of a DeLorean, somehow . . .

and another shot of C-Tractor 5.

On the morning of day 8 on the road, we caught USS Enterprise (CVN-65), the world’s first nuclear-powered carrier  . . . from the eastern end of Beach Boulevard, Mayport.

Later in the day, from Miami Beach, we spotted Jan Caribe and then

a “floating-billboard” on the canal just west of the Beach,

a storm front moving across the Beach from

the Everglades and out to  sea, as

container vessel Sluisgracht heads into port.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who’s now headed out to see what Day 9 can show.

Day 7 away from the sixth boro had found me quite desperate.  I’d started to see tugs everywhere although of an unfamiliar sort:  carved into quartz monzonite,

on road signs, and

even along the South Carolina/Georgia state line on my road atlas !

So imagine my joy today when I finally met face-to-face longtime friend of the tugster blog, JED, who  invited me onto C-Tractor 12 to see

tugs at work doing what could never be seen in the boro up north where supposedly I carry the title of mayor.  Here in the St Johns RiverC-Tractor 12 and C-Tractor 5 assist USS Klakring (FFG 42) as it heads for sea.

More from Mayport soon.  Many thanks to JED for the tour.

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My job . . . Summer AND Fall 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

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My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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