You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘East Coast’ category.

What caught my attention was the towed side-by-side barge arrangement in the KVK,

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GL 65 and 66,

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with Stephanie Dann hanging off the stern.

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Once between Stapleton and Bay Ridge, the tow was re-made and

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and Sarah Dann took the two out the Narrows.

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Forty-eight hours later, they are still southbound, almost 350 nautical miles out of the sixth boro and off Cape Hatteras, and still southbound.

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So I have this question . . .  so since there are southbound train songs, why do I know  no southbound tow songs.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Not Afrodite although Apollon is otherwise a twin.

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This IS Afrodite.  All the rest of these fotos are compliments of Paul Strubeck.

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In this set of Paul’s fotos, you may conclude that his conveyance is overtaking Afrodite, but I’m reversing the order as the vessel  Afrodite–leaves the upper Hudson running towards sea and St. John.

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Click here for the rest of the TCM (I’m not sure why the T-E- N) fleet.

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This looks like Kathleen Turecamo and Frances assisting Afrodite out of the berth.

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I took the first foto, but all the others I am grateful to Paul Strubeck for.

I’ll ‘fess up . . . this is the picture in my head when I think of Afrodite.  And here is a former USN vessel by that same name!

 

The season comes to the east coast in late summer.  New York’s 2013 sixth boro race is 12 days away, but you can get tickets to watch it from a boat already by clicking here.  Be patient  . . . it may load slowly.

This is NOT a foto from NYC.  Can you guess where you’d see this original OSV design?  OSV here means “offshore (lobster) supplying vessel,”  which I confess are my first love in workboat design, dating from back when I lived in New Hampshire.  All fotos in this post come thanks to Birk Thomas, a force behind this site and its Facebook version, which generates a lot of pics  of workboats from all over.

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If you guessed Portland, Maine . . . this is the pre-race lineup for the MS Harborfest.

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I’m pretty sure this foto was taken from Andrew McAllister.

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And it’s push-off time.

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So in New York on September 1, whether you ride the boat or watch from the pier . . . I hope to see you there.

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Although the September 1 race in NYC is the 21st annual in the current series, the races date back to before I was born.  See fotos of the vessels from the 1952 race here.  Back then, an international lifeboat race–rowers came from whatever cargo ships were in port at that time–was part of the festivities.

Again, many thanks to Birk Thomas for these fotos.  And if you do Facebook, check out tugboatinformation there.

Click here for an account of gallivants in and around Ocracoke and Hatteras Inlets as well as my connection to these waters.  Beaufort Inlet–near Cape Lookout–is scheduled for some depth maintenance these days with Marinex Construction excavating what McFarland count not extract.  Katherine Weeks enters the inlet from sea with a light scow.

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The only USACE presence I saw was Snell.  USACE awarded Marinex the contract to subtract a half million tons of sand from beneath these waves.

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I believe this is cutterhead/pipleine dredge Savannah, connected by pipeline to this

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scow and loading equipment.

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When Katherine tows the loaded scow out–here past Sea Quest II, a dive boat (more on that later)

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Na Hoku-formerly a K-Sea vessel

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tails.  The Sea Knight helicopter

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just happened overhead.  I’d love the view from a helicopter here.

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Once through the narrow inlet, Katherine heads out for the dumping area and Na Hoku returns to its holding station.

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Who knew the inlet could be this busy . . . l to r:  Grace Moran, Aurora, Na Hoku, and Salamina1.  More on the last one on that list tomorrow.   Aurora, listed as a sulphur carrier, carries PotashCorp colors.

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Potash Corp has their big mine about 35 miles from here, as the pelicans fly.

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Chief is clearly a Marinex tug.

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I’m not sure the ID of the inbound vessel here passing Chief, here heading out to the dredge.

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I can’t say for certain about that dive boat early on and whether the divers had been on Queen Anne’s Revenge, but there’ve been lots of salvage activity around the Inlet in recent days.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

If I go cold-sixth-boro-turkey and don’t inhale the harbor air or take in the sights steaming in from all corners of the globe, I get jittery, feel constrained.

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There’s lots that fires up the imagination for me, but what really stokes my machinery is

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the names.  Following is a list of names I’ve seen on on East Coast US AIS the past few days  .  . . some in far-off places but what evocative names!!  I’m NOT talking yachts.  These are container ships, tankers, and bulk carriers.

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Red Lily, Angelic Power, Tango Sea, Atlantic Tramp, Silver Soul, Ivory Girl, Pink, Billion Trader, Romantic . . .    Wow!!  There’s nothing routine or lackluster or sinister about those.  Who in a company comes up with these?  I’d love to hear what “off the air” commentary gets expressed about these names.  What is the most memorable vessel name you’ve ever seen?

Do you have any favorites?

Bear with me here . . . you’ll understand the title in a bit.  But first, any sense of the difference between these first two fotos A and

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B?

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It turns out that the person who sent these fotos to me has since also used them . . . and put them first in his post, just as I had chosen to before seeing his post.

Nearer vessel below is Terrapin Island, taken just outside the Narrows in May 2012.  Vessel in the distance is Ellen McAllister.

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Here are more closeups of Terrapin Island.

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At some point since May, she headed down south to southern Georgia . . . northern Florida coast.

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Next fotos come from JED.  That’s Terrapin Island in the background.

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To see what JED does with the above fotos and many more, click here.

Many thanks to JED for the first two and last fotos.  The difference between A and B is eight knots v.  twelve.

First, check “parrotlect flickrstream” along the left margin here for my favorite 45 fotos from the start of the Great Chesapeake Schooner Race last week.  I had posted some of them earlier, but put them up in the moment and without the benefit of my “foto-cleanup” tools.

Here is the real predecessor for this post . . . small specialized East coast designs.  And here’s a question . . . guess the loa and beam of this vessel.  Answer and fotos follow.

 Some small craft are just beautiful . . .  sweet

not to emphasize the “just” there.  Seriously sweet lines here.

And here. And nearby but in the shadows was a twin called Puffin.   And that vintage Johnson Sea horse 18 was attached to the

the prettiest motorboat I’ve ever seen.  I don’t think that Johnson comes with the blender attachment seen here!!

This is Silk.  Silk is a pushboat.  Believe it or not, it’s the prime mover for a 65′ skipjack, and while hauling for oysters, Silk needs to be hanging high and dry.  I regret I didn’t get a chance to look at the engine.

Stanley Norman dates from 1902.  And that boom looks impossibly long.

And here’s a surprise, maybe.  The vessel in the top foto here is a restored 1925 Hooper Island Draketail named Peg Wallace, measuring a belief-defying 37’6″ loa with a beam of only 6’8″!!  I’d written of local Chesapeake and southern boats here almost two years ago, but this was my first encounter with a draketail.  Scroll down to pete44’s comment here to learn his sense of the origin of the design.

I’d love to see her move through the water.

Draketail . . .  named for a duck.  Make way!

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

About a year ago, bright-eyed bowsprite caught a glimpse of USAV LCU-2011 running through the sixth boro.  Last week I knew another LCU was heading northward in the Chesapeake as the schooner race proceeded southward.  Little did I know I’d intersect with it at several points as I returned to the sixth boro myself.  The first visual contact I made at Fox Point State Park, along the Delaware between Wilmington and Chester, PA.    Fox Point’s namesake is S. Marston Fox, who inspired the Park’s creation from what had previously been a riverside dump, and of course many more positive things before that.   See the LCU way in the distance?

And this is looking back toward Wilmington (and the Delaware Memorial Bridge)  from near where the previous shot was taken.

I hope you didn’t think that mere speck above was the only view you’d have of Brandy Station.

The Commodore Barry Bridge and Philly Skyline are visible here.  I’d never have guessed the Commodore Barry was younger than the Verrazano.

To my surprise, a few hours later . . . I arrived at Penn’s Landing, et voila!

The Army has 35 of these vessels.

That’s the Ben Franklin Bridge in the background.

Our third encounter happened the next morning . . . as Brandy Station arced across the river and headed back to . . . . the Chesapeake!

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who’s back in the sixth boro.

For an LCU high and dry, click here.  For LCUs worldwide, click here.

When this event happened on Memorial Day in the sixth boro, I wrote about it as “cast.”   The New London cast right after the 4th of July was quite different.   All these fotos come with thanks to Birk Thomas, now at sea. Ferry New London is automatically part of the local and daily cast .

Thames (rhymes with “james” ) Towboat Company’s   John P. Wronowski (2004) was built in Florida.

Gwendolyn (1975) was built in Louisiana.

USCGC Eagle began to take shape in Hamburg in 1936.

USS Carter Hall had her keel laid in Louisiana in 1991.

Adam uses her 450 hp mostly around the Thames Towboat Company yards, where it was built.

Patricia Ann came out of a Louisiana shipyard as a YTB on hull #758 . .  to Hercules #766, now in Nigeria.

Figureheads need inspection.

John P. and Paul A. Wronowski (1980 in Connecticut) assist USS Carter Hall into its berth.  Paul A. was one of the first z-drive tugs ever built.

Ticonderoga (1936 by Herreshoff in Boston as Tioga) begs to be seen from closer, much closer.

Ferry Race Point is cast, even if she’s really working the run to Fisher’s Island.

Behold Wolf . . . she flies the flag of the Conch Republic, where I found myself exactly a year ago!

Cisne Branco . . . like Eagle was in the sixth boro almost two months ago.

Schooner Brilliant, 1932 in the Bronx, is truly brilliant.

Schooner A. J. Meerwald, 1932 in South Jersey, homeports in Bivalve . . . yes the village is truly called that.

Wisconsin-built YP-700 had its keel laid in 1987.

Another shot of Paul A.

It’s Amistad  (Connecticut with a 2000 launch) with its unmistakable rake.

Again . . . many thanks to Birk for these fotos.

First . . . a foto from Cape Town thanks to Colin.  Any idea what purpose the wire coils around the bulwarks of Teliri serve?  Answer at end of post.

Next, from French mariner Herrou Xtian, a LeHavre-based rotor tug RT Claire, now working in Bremerhaven.  For a sense of what she looks like below the waterline, click here.

Also from Xtian, it’s a huge salvage tug Abeille Bourbon.  Xtian’s has a model-building question later in this post.  And I hope to have fotos of a huge tug myself in the next few days.

And from Dave Chappell, Mobro’s Rio Bravo (ex-Gus Candies, 1973)  towing a scow through Jacksonville, FL.

Also from Dave, two old tugs (anyone identify??) travel under the Ben Franklin swing bridge near Charleston, SC.

Teliri has been laying cable in pirate/gangster? infested waters, so it could be construed the coils of barbed wire intends to discourage unwelcomed visits.

And here’s Xtian’s question, stemming from his work on Crowley’s former vessel Centurion.  On his model, the lighter strips represent the keel coolers.  How far do the ones marked A and B extend, and what exactly do they look like.

Here are fotos I took of Centurion high and dry on Mighty Servant 1, about to leave NYC’s sixth boro for Nigeria.  However, the portion Xtian wants to see is obscured in all my fotos.  Anyone help?

Final shot, also from Colin . ..  who’s following the progress of Alwyn Vintcent inland from Cape town on a 90-wheel rig operated by ALE.  Here’s a previous ship-haul job by ALE.

I won’t post tomorrow or friday most likely . .  because I’ll be gallivanting “on assignment.”

Thanks much Colin, Xtian, and Dave.

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My job . . . Summer AND Fall 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

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My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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