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Just photos for now…  I’m day 5 on the Canal, having traveled from Little Falls to Phoenix.  If I had more time and better personal technology, I’d write more.  Enjoy.

Know what the “D” on the stack is for?

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The Dutra Group . .  . a California company with a vessel bearing quite the sixth boro name.

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Click here for particulars on the dredger.

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Until two years ago, it belonged to Bean.

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Surely . ..  she’s an industrial and industrious vessel.

Here were pics of Padre Island from a few years back, another trailing suction hopper dredge (TSHD).

Two TSHDs operating in the sixth boro include Manson  Construction’s Glenn Edwards .  . . and

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Dutra‘s . . .   Stuyvesant.

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Glenn Edwards photos by Brian DeForest and Stuyvesant photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here was 7.  In the past week, the sixth boro has seen lows to about 5 . . . like last Monday morning, and highs in the low 50s.    And then there’s been serious fog, as bowsprite captures here.  This morning was clear and mild, almost springlike.  Here was the north end of the Arthur Kill today a little after 0700, Capt Log heading south for a load.

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To the left, NYK Rigel prepares to shove off from Howland Hook.    To the right, dredgers dig on. . .  or diggers dredge on.   James Turecamo heads north and east . . .

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as Minerva Zenia makes her way under the Goethals.

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I wonder how I’ll get used to the alteration of the classic form of the Bayonne Bridge.

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Here’s the impressive assembling of equipment staging for work on that other bridge project.   Glenn Edwards looks huge in the mix.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp, just before the sun came up.

Crow languishes here in Port Newark.

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A detail-impoverished foto of Manson Construction‘s hopper dredge Glenn Edwards along with tug Kendall J. Hebert.  Actually Samantha Miller is hiding in the haze near starboard stern of the dredge, anchored in Gravesend Bay.

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Click here for a coloful foto of Kendall J. Hebert.

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Some of the other boats I’ve seen recently are Susan E. Witte,

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Katherine,  (Last summer I caught Katherine pulling a dredge scow in Morehead City, North Carolina)

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Pati R. Moran, 

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Ron G, which I first read as Rong.  Often she’s in Philadelphia.

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Gabby L Miller,

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Miriam Moran returning to base after retrieving the docking pilot,

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And finally, a boat I’ve never seen before . . . Navigator.  Anyone know her story?  I took this foto Sunday morning.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Twenty thousand feet under the sea?

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well . . . maybe just some marine equipment in a drydock.

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Oh!  This is Caddell’s Drydock #1, which you saw enter the harbor here just five months ago.

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And this is Weeks Marine R. S. Weeks, with an unmistakeable ladder–the part that works while submerged.  Click here to see what’s left exposed when the ladder is submerged and working.

Since this vessel is 32 years older than C. R. McCaskill, featured on this blog last week, it seems natural to compare them.  Visually, design features differ.  This dredge has quite different support structure (I know there must be a technical term (help?) . . . but I’ll try “derrick” to raise and lower the ladder and cutterhead.   Ditto, the spud support structure on the stern differs.  Click here for specifics, but it turns out that R. S. Weeks has a larger hull (268′ x 65′ x 17′  versus 230′ x 62′ x 14′) but cannot operate as deep as McCaskill.   Also, Weeks was built on the Susquehanna in 1980 to serve as an “industrial vessel” for Adco.  Not sure what that means.

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Here are some closer-ups of the work.

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This foto comes thanks to Allen Baker.

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All other fotos by Will Van Dorp.

For a close up experience with the cutterhead, click here.   For a bowsprite rendition, click here.

Aug 31.  A late summer day at the beach, where a new “towel drying rack” has been adopted and a bumper crop

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of sand awaits the erosion of winter, perhaps?  All photos here taken by Barbara Barnard.

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Sept 1.  A tug (Trevor?) moves a crane barge to where the “drying rack”/piping needs to be fished out for transport to the next job.

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Sept 13.  The remaining pipe on the beach, no longer serving to dry swimmers’ towels, awaits dismantling and

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allows for closer inspection.

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This Rockaway series was of course motivated by Hurricane Sandy and the photos of Rockaway by my friend Barbara in the past 12 months.  Barbara, many thanks.   Here was my Nemo to Flag Day post, which started with a mystery house.

And now it looks like the Nola “make it right” rebuilding plan is coming to the Rockaways.  Click here for the design for “resilient house.”    Here’s an earlier article.

Click here for a project/business entirely created by the devastation of trees during the storm.  It’s not maritime, water,  or even specifically landthreshold related, but is quite interesting.

What’s this?  Answer follows.    And I just stumbled onto this blog . . . Crewboat Chronicles.    Crew boat or crewboat?

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OK . . . asking questions seems to be where this post wants to head.  What’s Stagetide?  The foto was taken on the hard not far north of Atlantic City and with the help of Fred Mallett.

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Here are two crewboats I got a blurry foto of a few weeks ago in the KVK.

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Crewboat Sabine plays lots of roles.  Is she doing a visual inspection of dredge pipe here?

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She also ferries crew and supplies between shore and projects, hydrographically surveys an area pre- and post-material removal, and shoos away non-project boats getting too close to the work.  Sabine was built in New Iberia in 1980.

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I’ve not been able to find out much about Stagetide.

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Circling back to the top foto . . . it was the Swiftboat from the Washington Navy Yard, a vessel whose design alludes to its crewboat origins, I think.   Here’s a post I did two years ago on swiftboats.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Related:  The Bayonne Bridge logo I’ve used on this blog since 2006 was taken from the USACE vessel . . . Hocking.  I believe that’s a crewboat, the first I ever rode in.  Anyone know where Hocking was built?

Here’s where the “leverman” sits for a twelve-hour shift as the C. R. McCaskill slews port to starboard 400′ once each three and a half minutes.   Another way of saying that is  the dredge moves using a five-point mooring system: two swing anchors, two breast anchors and one stern anchor to move forward or back.  A different configuration uses a spudded idler barge;  in this case, the “swing” is longer and takes more more time.   Food gets delivered so that the leverman aka dredge operator can monitor all these screens and respond so that dredging can proceed 24/7 as long as equipment and conditions permit.  More on food later.

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Slewing . . . drawing on cables attached to positioned anchors and pivoting on a stern point . . . requires that the 30” diamater hose be able to flex.  Hence, the easy curved slack before the piping to the beach.

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The crewboat in the distance alternates between hydrographic survey work and other tasks.  More on that in a moment.  More crewboats in a future post.

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Attachment at the stern is a ball and socket joint . . . like your hip.

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Here’s the starboard GE engine, part of the power supply to the dredge.

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Here is another view of the two huge hull-mounted pumps that do the work.

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Another task of the crewboat is illustrated here:  recreational boaters sometimes allow their curiosity to override any sense of danger caused by a busy, slewing dredge.

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The helicopter happened to be here on assignment to photograph the work from the air.

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About the food, here’s  mission control presided over by Edwina Arthur, a member of the 30-50 person crew.

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Food rules and pecking order are clearly posted.

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Captain Randy Guidry, my host for this tour,  proudly displays the builder’s plate, Corn Island Shipyard in Indiana, where the hull was constructed.

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As I stated in the previous post, McCaskill’s part in the dredging/beach replenishment has now ended and vessels and crew have moved south for the next job.

Many thanks to Captain Guidry, Jan Andrusky, and all the other fine folks at Weeks Marine for this tour.

All fotos, text, and (any inadvertent errors) by Will Van Dorp.

Here and here are previous posts on a Rockaway Beach replenishment dredging operation that has now ended.   Sea Wolf is still local, but the vessel on the horizon (“atop” the red buoy) has now moved to southern NJ.  Remember, for most fotos, doubleclick enlarges.

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Weeks’ Trevor was assisting in this project.

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Also assisting was George W.

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But here’s the powerhouse, the dredge.  Let’s take a tour.

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In spite of about 16,000 total horsepower, C. R. McCaskill is not self-propelled.  To see what towed the dredge to the south, see the foto at the end of this post.    All that power moves the cutterhead on the submerged arm (called a “ladder”) that extends to the sand at the bottom of the Channel here.  At the top end of the ladder are two huge pumps (you could stand inside the pump housing) that suck the sand and whatever else off the bottom and send it as a slurry to a point on the beach some miles away.  Click here for a pdf that shows the beautiful (ok . . . roll your eyes) virgin red cutterhead with green teeth.    Each tooth weighs around 35 pounds!

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Here inside the dredge are some interesting astounding facts about the machine.

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See the sand colored building on the horizon off the stern of McCaskill?  That’s the area around 105th St. Rockaway Beach where the sand is headed through piping powered by this vessel.  The first few fotos in this post were taken at that beach.  There’ll be another Rockaway post soon.

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Candace towed C. R. McCaskill south.  I missed her when she was in town, but John Skelson caught her here.  Click on the foto to see John’s complete shot.  Many thanks to John for use of that shot from his Flickr page.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp, except for the one shared by John Skelson.  For more info on each of the Weeks tugs, click here.  More McCaskill tomorrow.

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My job . . . Summer 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

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