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Here just over a year ago was the release information about the documentary.

And here’s the BIG announcement:  the world premiere of the documentary will happen Wednesday, May 7 at 7 pm at the Brooklyn Heights Cinema and tickets for that evening’s fare . . . including ours are now on sale.  Click here for directions to Brooklyn Heights Cinema on Henry Street.   If you haven’t seen the documentary, we DO turn back the clock on some of the skeletons in the yard.

Just over a week ago, I stopped to look at the yard from outside, from the muddy margins.  Some photos are below.  In 2011, Gary Kane and I had permission to film inside the yard from a leaky rowboat, and the footage of “beautiful ruins” comes to you directly from the leaky rowboat.  By the way, I had a hand-powered bilge pump that kept our equipment dry.

Fragments with a wading bird,

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disintegration with graffiti,

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commingled wreckage,

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terminally rusted disrepair,

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debris still morphing but identifiable,

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ravaged whole machines juxtaposed with live ones.

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Here was the 2010 end of the “graveyard” series . . . all photos shot in the ship graveyard.  Use the search window to see  segments 1 through 3.  And here is the end of the “ghost puzzles” series, all photos I shot while we were filming the scrapyard portion of the documentary.

I hope to see you at the May 7 showing at the Brooklyn Heights Cinema; here again is the link for details.  Also, if you do Facebook, please go to the Graves of Arthur Kill page and click like.

Unrelated to some degree, click here for my latest photos in Professional Mariner magazine.

 

Eastbound and from left, it’s Sunny Williams, Sarah Ann, and Ellen McAllister.

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Around the same time, it’s a light Patrice McAllister eastbound.  Compare the April 2014 shot below with these April 2012 ones of her first arriving in the sixth boro after the tragic fire on Lake Ontario.

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After all the ice work Kimberly Poling has done the past few months, Sunday was a welcome sunny day, I’ll assume.

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It wasn’t until this tow turned away from head-one that I understood what I was looking at . . ..

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but closer in  . . . it was clearly Stephen Dann (I think this is her first appearance on this blog) towing

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crane barge Strong Island.

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Off Owl’s Head, it’s Pacific Reliance and Discovery Coast (I think) off to the west.

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Pacific Reliance appeared here about six weeks ago.

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Catherine Turecamo stands by near Gulf Pearl.

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Parting shot . . . following up on the opening shot of this post.

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All photos the past few days by Will Van Dorp.

From midday . .  til dusk.  Here between Morris Canal and Battery Park City, Gabby heads south.

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Mister T mightily pulls six scows here between

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the Williamsburg and the Manhattan Bridges.

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Near midtown on the East River, there’s an eastbound unit and a westbound one.

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Westbound, it’s Cheyenne moving crushed cars, and

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and–eastbound– Captain Zeke with petro product.  By the way, Captain Zeke was moving faster than the uncrushed cars on the highway in the distance, probably because of some unintentional crushing that had happened.

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From near Hell Gate now, looking back at Captain Zeke, what a moody city!!

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here was the first time I used this title, which clearly needs to be used again.

Let me start here at 13:38.  Note from far to near, or black hull to black hull . . . Cartagena, Four Sky with Lee T Moran, Red Hook, and Genco Knight.

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Twin Tube slides through the opening between Bow Kiso and Genco Knight.

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Even the bow of Genco Knight is crowded as their vessel prepares to dock and resupply the salt depot.

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Kimberly Turecamo works the bulk carrier’s stern as Evening Star passes with B. No. 250.

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Add McAllister Girls in the foreground and Ellen McAllister in the distance against the blue hull, which will appear a bit later.

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McCrews heads westbound and Four Sky now seems to be doing the same.

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Are you out of breath yet?  Only 10 minutes has elapsed.

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Linehandler 1 cruises blithely through it, supremely self-assured.

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Cheyenne adds color.

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Another line handler boat scouts out the set up . . . as a new blue hull arrives from the west, as

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. .  . does Charles D. McAllister.

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Crew on the blue hull–Nord Observer–stows lines as they head for tropical heat, escorted

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by Catherine Turecamo although

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at the turn on the Con Hook range they meet Mare Pacific heading in with Joan Turecamo and Margaret  Moran.  At this point . . .

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14:12 . . .  the mergansers decided to hightail it . . . or at least follow their crests.  And I hadn’t even turned around yet to see the congestion on land behind me.

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All these photos in a very short time by Will Van Dorp.

My thanks to Brian DeForest and Atlantic Salt, whom Genco Knight was arriving to restock.

Here was a post about a dense traffic day as well as a busy day.

Here was the first in this series.  The good news is that this past Saturday Sea Lion was raised.  The first two images are credited to Tug Life at Henry Marine and Orlando Martinez.

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Jon Harrison caught the next two over on the west side of Bergen Point . . . .  It’s the crane barge Columbia and the raised tug gets moved over to Port Newark.

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She’s up and now there’s a lot of rebuild work to do, but I suspect before summer, she’ll be working again.

Thanks much Tug Life Henry Marine, Orlando, and Jon.

Click here and scroll for a previous Columbia job.  

I don’t know how many folks were glued to this webcam yesterday, but I was not the only one.  Let me walk us around the foto, different in subtle ways than the other five in this post.   First, note the time stamp upper left:  it’s 11:16 a.m.   This was happening yesterday midmorning at the Miraflores Lock, the first of three set of lifts out of the Pacific on a transit toward the Atlantic/Caribbean.  In the distance on the right side, the large white object is Norwegian Star, negotiating the next set of locks . . . Pedro Miguel Locks.

The ship almost fully shown in this foto is Tai Success, bound for Altamira, Mexico.  Tai Success is 656′ loa (length overall)  by 104′ , the maximum width for the current set of locks.   Extending from lower left is the ex-Left Coast Lifter, towed by Lauren Foss.    Note the relative size of Tai Success and the crane barge.   Lauren Foss at 141′  loa is larger than almost all tugs currently on the Hudson.

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11:20 a. m.  The entire crane is in the lock chamber.  On the stern of the crane barge is Cerro Majagual, a 2013 Panama Canal tug built in Spain.  For the transit from the San Francisco Bay area to Panama, this role was played by another Foss tug, Iver Foss.  Iver is currently waiting for the tow on the Atlantic side.

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11:24.   The water in the lock has started to rise.

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11:30

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11:40.  The doors on the high side of the Miraflores Locks have opened and the tow heads for Pedro Miguel.  By the way, on the horizon beyond the Pedro Miguel you can see the Centennial Bridge, about 10 years old.  As of this writing this morning, the tow was docked just north of this bridge.  I suspect it will complete the transit and be on the Atlantic side by the end of today.

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I see from the Journal News story that Fluor has already changed the crane name from Left Coast Lifter to I Lift New York, presuming they’ve “purged the old from Poseidon’s ledger.”  If you look at the fourth foto above, you’ll notice “Left Coast Lifter” is still painted there.  I wonder when that will be painted over;  maybe the name purging will happen in Gatun Lake today?

Meanwhile, I’d like to propose some alternatives . . .  Hudson River Hoister and Tappan Zee Titan are more local and maintain  the same LCL pattern.

As to size, currently the largest crane in the Hudson Valley is DonJon’s Chesapeake 1000, the number being its tonnage lifting capacity.    Last summer in Rio, I saw a crane called Pelicano 1 with a lifting capacity said to exceed 2000 tons.  The ex-LCL is said to hav a capacity around 1900 tons.

Click here for one of the posts I did from the Panama Canal–a place well worth a visit and a second visit– about two years ago.

Keep in mind that once the tow clears the Atlantic side locks, it’s still more than 2000 nautical miles from the Narrows.  Assuming an average speed of seven knots and no delays for weather or other causes, that’s still almost two weeks.  So, I’ll wager ETA at the Narrows around February 1.

Here was number 6 in this series.  It occurred to me this afternoon to rename the whole series “weather overwater,” as a tip of the hat to Dr.  Jeff Masters and his site.  His 18-minute TED talk at the link with his name on it is worth the 18 minutes.   And what do you imagine happens on and over sixth boro water on a day like this . . . ?

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The usual.  Diane B pushes a fuel barge, leaving BW Amazon behind,

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Cheyenne consolidates scrap,

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Davis Sea pushes oil somewhere up river as she did here and here,

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Susana S, in the same location here a year ago, takes on bunkers. . .

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. . . along with Stavanger Breeze.

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Fishing goes on, and pilots

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do their thing no matter the weather since 1694.

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More bad weather coming . . . so what.   Not that it’s easy, though.

. ..  to paraphrase Mark Twain …are highly exaggerated.

What?   . . . you ask?  Well, click on Auke Visser’s link.  You’ll see a foto of her being raised after a sinking.   Then follow through to the phrase “disposal date.”

September 2005.

Ticonderoga looks pretty good for being technically scrapped.

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I took these pictures in December 2013, earlier this week.

Check Auke’s link:  she was built in Baltimore in 1954 and had sailed as Socony 9, Mobil 9, and Exxon’s Ticonderoga–her name when she ran aground and sank in 1992.

 

Crow languishes here in Port Newark.

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A detail-impoverished foto of Manson Construction‘s hopper dredge Glenn Edwards along with tug Kendall J. Hebert.  Actually Samantha Miller is hiding in the haze near starboard stern of the dredge, anchored in Gravesend Bay.

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Click here for a coloful foto of Kendall J. Hebert.

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Some of the other boats I’ve seen recently are Susan E. Witte,

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Katherine,  (Last summer I caught Katherine pulling a dredge scow in Morehead City, North Carolina)

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Pati R. Moran, 

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Ron G, which I first read as Rong.  Often she’s in Philadelphia.

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Gabby L Miller,

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Miriam Moran returning to base after retrieving the docking pilot,

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And finally, a boat I’ve never seen before . . . Navigator.  Anyone know her story?  I took this foto Sunday morning.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

FedEx in the sky, container barge at the ASI yard on this side, Donjon Marine yard on the other side, and off the end of the channel, highways and railways.  By the way, Fred Smith has long been one of my heros.

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EWR is one of three very busy airports in greater New York.

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Note the control tower at the airport.  Check that link for a view of the whole complex from the air.

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And the ship . . .  since 1 September, here’s a list of ports it has called in:   Balikpapan,   Yeosu,   Huanghua,  Aviles (maybe) , Red Dog Mine, and who knows where else.  And some of the crew . . . are dreaming of visiting Times Square and Rockefeller tonight.

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And if this is Port Newark, then next it’s Norfolk.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

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More Photos

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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