You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Delaware River’ category.

Field test for a new digital camouflage pattern?

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Actually it’s this, CVA-59 . . . decommissioned for over 20 years and now moving

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south and then west.  Justin Earl gave permission to use the photo below.  For more pics of the move out of Philly, click here.

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Dave Boone took the rest of these.  Here, the tow approaches the Chester waterfront.

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Assisting here–as they approach Fox Point–a great place to see river traffic–are (I believe) Alex McAllister, Timothy, and Bridget.

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Check out this 12-minute video on her construction.  It makes an appropriate start to an epitaph for this vessel.

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Fair weather, Lauren.

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Many thanks to Justin Earl and Dave Boone for use of these photos.  Justin’s chief mate on Lauren and has been on board since Panama. I took the top two photos back in June 2010.  It’s hard to believe that Lauren, Iver and the crane coming through the Narrows was less than a week ago!

Slight digressions:  here are my latest photos of Timothy from more than six months ago.  And here’s a post I did over a year ago with shots from Fox Point.

This first foto is by a secret salt . . . showing Dory (1978) and Captain Zeke (1980) tandem towing  beach-lounging 125′ deck barge back onto the water.

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And  . . . attributed by the watermark . . . fotos from last week before Janus chilled the town,  Atlantic Conveyor gets an assist from Charles D. McAllister (1967).

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Shelby (1978) also worked in the January fog.  Thanks, Brian.

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And the rest of the fotos are mine:  the seldom-seen Specialist (1956?), here close and

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closer.

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Two Coasts . . . Chesapeake (2011) and Emerald (1973).

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Resolute (1975) about to pass Düsseldorf Express (1998),

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And from Philly . . .  High Roller (1969) with The Recycler (1989 . . . from THE George Steinbrenner’s yard in Nashville, TN.  Here’s some history on The Recycler and its twin.

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Many thanks to the secret salt and Brian DeForest for their fotos.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

This NYPD officer of the peace got tugged right into a recent parade.  When that happens, you know all things could get downright disorderly.

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This last June post is a melange of Pegasus and Lehigh Valley 79 in a setting rays irritating my camera,

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Patuxent in the Philly dawn,

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Sea Hawk approaching the St. John’s Bridge,

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Patuxent redux,

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Natoma docked in the Columbia,

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Caspian Sea in the Delaware,

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Surrie Moran in the same waters,

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Aries in Portland,

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Madeline,

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Black Hawk,

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more Black Hawk, 

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Cape Henry,

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again Madeline,

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and finally Lewiston.

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Rounding things out, it’s Siberian Sea in palm trees country aka the sixth boro, taken about a year ago.  I will resume the blog as soon as I can in a land with more palm trees

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Thanks for reading the blog and sending comments either here or via email.  Sorry if I haven’t acknowledged everyone who’s sent along a tidbit or nice word.

If you’ve never taken a Working Harbor tour in NYC’s sixth boro, here’s info.  If you  know the sixth boro pretty well–especially the contemporary commercial aspects of it, you might even propose to them to narrate a tour.  That’s just me suggesting that, but there are folks who want to better understand the role of shipping and its interaction between the sixth boro and the five terrestrial ones.

Thanks to Seth Tane for the fotos of Aries, Black Hawk, Lewiston, Nahoma, and Sea Hawk.  All others by Will Van Dorp who hopes to next post from the obscure January River.

River traffic travels in all weather and times of day.   So at first I was dismayed to be without my camera, but fortunately Elizabeth had hers when Timothy McAllister came past and got

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really close.  Thanks to the crew, whose demonstration probably inspired some young’uns to want to grow up and be mariners.

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Earlier Madeline had moseyed past, checking out Gazela and all else along the PA side while

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Captain Harry did the same on the NJ side.

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While the rain fell, Caspian Sea headed out as

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Teresa McAllister headed upriver.

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as did Reid McAllister.

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Art and reality mimic each other.  At the Independence Seaport Museum, you have just over a month left to see the exhibit of friend and marine artist Dave Boone’s work and wit.

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You’ll be thrilled by the paintings and the biographical materials.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp, except the first two by Elizabeth Wood, who had a charged phone.

Quick post from the Delaware.  Can you guess the tow?

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Sentry tows El Rey.  Next stop . . . San Juan?  Note the crewman in the way upperhouse on the barge.  Is the barge crewed for the entire trip?

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Photos of the Delaware?

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Escorts down the river include Surrie Moran and

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Cape Henry.

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Recognize the vessel to the right?

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All fotos this morning by Will Van Dorp.

Sandy?  Of course, if you live inland from a beach, you may be scoured by the stuff.

These signs appeared along the NJ Turnpike today.

I had to return to the sixth boro from a little time spent in Philly.  I saw Lois Ann L. Moran (2009, Washburn & Doughty) pass quite close to Penn’s Landing, but she was way up by Fishtown by the time I could grab my camera.

High Roller (1969, Jakobson) passed also, but the light hardly allowed Roller‘s brilliance to show.  Scroll through for a foto of High Roller and her siblings with unique names in a post I did here over two years ago.  The dome is the Camden aquarium, where some float-through-and-over-anything hippos live.

Two weeks ago, these small craft bobbed resplendent in summery sunny, but now a storm that should be called stormy or squally or even super-tempestuous dulls their colors.

For now, get to high ground;  otherwise, batten ‘em down.  Dog’em.  Double’em up.

All fotos today by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s some sixth boro area tempests of past years.  As I post this (1700 hrs), Queen Mary 2, Maersk Kentucky, and Yasa Golden Dardanel are among the last large vessels leaving boro6 for the safety of sea.

gCaptain comments on vessel heading counter-to-trend with paramount urgency . . .  here.

I’d seen McFarland before . . . once at the dock stern out and another time anchored in the middle of the night on Delaware Bay, lit up like a parking lot.  I’m so thrilled that I’ll run a series of her . . . .starting with the USACE dredge passing Pac Alnath.

A first sighting for me . . . Charles Burton.

Back to McFarland . . . one of four ocean-going hopper dredges operated by the USACE.  Can you name the other three?

. . . Nanticoke and Peter F. Gellatly, both pushing Vane barges.

Huge turntable on McFarland.

Chief . . . I believe the 1979 built vesel.

From this USACE publication, I like this statistic:  a full load of dredged materials McFarland carries equals the capacity of 310 dump trucks.

Just before sunrise, she steamed by . . . and passed B. Franklin Reinauer in the city of Benjamin Franklin himself.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

The other three dredges are Wheeler, Essayons, and Yaquina.   For comparison info about the four, click here.  For Bert Visser’s directory with fotos of all the large dredgers in the world, click here.

For a post on Delaware River tugs from 2010, click here.  What I’d like to see one of these days is the loading of livestock down in Wilmington.    Currently, Falconia is at the dock;  I saw her from the highway on Friday.

About a year ago, bright-eyed bowsprite caught a glimpse of USAV LCU-2011 running through the sixth boro.  Last week I knew another LCU was heading northward in the Chesapeake as the schooner race proceeded southward.  Little did I know I’d intersect with it at several points as I returned to the sixth boro myself.  The first visual contact I made at Fox Point State Park, along the Delaware between Wilmington and Chester, PA.    Fox Point’s namesake is S. Marston Fox, who inspired the Park’s creation from what had previously been a riverside dump, and of course many more positive things before that.   See the LCU way in the distance?

And this is looking back toward Wilmington (and the Delaware Memorial Bridge)  from near where the previous shot was taken.

I hope you didn’t think that mere speck above was the only view you’d have of Brandy Station.

The Commodore Barry Bridge and Philly Skyline are visible here.  I’d never have guessed the Commodore Barry was younger than the Verrazano.

To my surprise, a few hours later . . . I arrived at Penn’s Landing, et voila!

The Army has 35 of these vessels.

That’s the Ben Franklin Bridge in the background.

Our third encounter happened the next morning . . . as Brandy Station arced across the river and headed back to . . . . the Chesapeake!

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who’s back in the sixth boro.

For an LCU high and dry, click here.  For LCUs worldwide, click here.

Not quite two weeks ago I did my first post of Blount-built boats in far flung places.  Read it here;  a list of sixth boro Blount vessels appears at the end.

Now I’m thrilled to put up these fotos, generously sent by Julie Blount, executive vice president of Blount Boats, Inc.  This is the launch of Blount’s cargo vessel  Kasai, 1960, bound for

the huge  inland waterways of the Congo.

Unrelated but what you might see on the inland waterways of central Africa could include MV Liemba, the second oldest operating steam ship in the world.  MV Liemba is the  ex-Graf von Götzen built 1912 in Papenburg, Germany on the Ems River, taken apart, and reassembled on the banks of Lake Tanganyika) . See this fine fine video trailer of MV Liemba underway.

Gratuitous foto of an interesting Blount vessel Sailor, taken on the Delaware River south of Philly last summer, and

one of Twin Tube provisioning Songa Emerald taken in the sixth boro last week.  Fire Island Ferries operates over a half dozen Blount boats.

Back to Blount’s Kasai, I wonder where it is today.  For an interesting set of fotos of Congo River system vessels from the time of Joseph Conrad until the relative present, click here.  The last shot of the skeletal remains of a steam vessel on a riverbank is haunting.

Thanks again to Julie Blount for the two fotos from the Blount archives.  The last two fotos by Will Van Dorp.

A short post . . . explained below.  If you live in reasonable travel time to the Manhattan boro, consider going to the Magnan Metz Gallery at 521 W 26th St to see Duke Riley‘s show.

Scroll to the end of this post to see references to previous works by Duke Riley.  Below is Acorn, a replica submarine (not in the current exhibit) involved in a 2007 “unauthorized” re-enactment of Bushnell’s Turtle attack on British vessels in the harbor in 1776.

To quote Eleanor Heartney in the introduction to the book accompanying the Magnan Metz show, “As American cities vie to transform their waterfronts into tourist attractions and high-end residential communities, it becomes difficult to remember that historically, the place where the city meets the sea has been the haven of society’s discards and degenerates…  long … fertile ground for tall tales and urban legends.  Duke Riley’s Imagined Histories, illegal performances and dioramic installations tap into that fast disappearing world, blending fact and fancy in a way that reminds us that history is anything but an objective science.”

The huge (say 10′ x 10′) drawing below–a centerpiece for one of the riparian tales–depicts the battle for what’s today called Petty Island (Citgo) Terminal in the Delaware River between Camden and Philadelphia.  Once it was a farm and a “kingdom” of the Laird family.  Now it’s home to a tank farm and container port.  Play this video for a clue to where I’m off to.  A foto of King Ralston Laird’s mural appears in the last foto of the last link in this post.

Riley’s huge works allude to his tattooing work.  They also suggest scrimshaw of another age.  Pynchonian in scope and beautifully Boschian in complexity and grotesqueness.   in I spent at least 15 minutes zeroing in on details in this huge tableau.

The other river tale  relates to the Cuyahoga.

If you live in NYC and think you’ve seen this work before, maybe you have:  it’s a current poster produced by Arts for Transit program.  Bonnie aka frogma wrote about it here.

I will post again when I can.  Meanwhile, get down to 521 West 26th Street.

Submarine foto above comes compliments of  Kitty Joe Sainte-Marie, Duke Riley’s project manager.  Many thanks.

Here’s an article on Duke Riley’s letter to Hugo Chavez, relative to Petty Island.  And scroll all the way through this article for a foto of King Ralston Laird atop one of the Petty Island storage tanks.

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My job . . . Summer 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

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