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Pulling the plug?

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Trying to put it back before the sixth boro drains away?  Freeing a fouled conning tower on an experimental North Korean  submarine?  Attempting a descent into a rumored rabbit hole?  Performance artist?  Very small bobber tender preparing for a large fish to bite?   Got a better caption?

Thanks for this photo sent by a secret salt . . .

Bergen Point, a 1958 Blount product,  coming through the Narrows last weekend.  Click here for many interesting vessels from Blount that have appeared on this blog.

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And a first timer on this blog . . . John Parrish.

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Penn No. 4 all painted white . . . click here and scroll through to see her in PennMaritime gray.

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Bluefin . .  still in PennMaritime gray . . . or is that primer?

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Maryland . . . with reflections.

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If my search window serves me right, then this is the first appearance of Katie G. McAllister on this blog.

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This is definitely the first appearance of Pelican State here.  The photo of this Great Lakes Dredge & Dock boat is here thanks to Mike and Michele Mcmorrow.

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And thanks to Mage, here’s Esti and

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Cerro Jefe.

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A previous view here  of Emily Ann had her as Solomon Sea.

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Brian Nicholas at work in Great Kills.  Click here (scroll through) to see her as both Banda Sea and Brian Nicholas.

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And finally . . . it’s the mystery tug Elbe when it was Maryland Pilot boat Maryland.  At its stern is its predecessor, Baltimore.  I haven’t found out much about Baltimore.  Any help?  About Maryland, Capt. Brian Hope–who shared this photo, said this, “In 1985 and MARYLAND was donated to Greenpeace.  She was a great boat, but too expensive to operate. She had a crew of 18, plus a chief steward.  The crew worked two weeks on and two weeks off, so that, counting the steward, we had a total of 37 crew.   When we went ashore that was reduced to about 21 and our fuel, repair and food costs dropped dramatically as well.   I am very glad to see that she has been preserved (in Maassluis).  She’s a great boat!”  Thanks to a generous reader, here’s an article about her sea trials.

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When next I post, I hope to share photos Elbe in her restored glory.

Sorry to miss NYC’s fleet week again.

F. Scott Fitzgerald said there were no second acts in American life . . . but as in this case, he was wrong about so many things.  We all have second and third acts, fourth and fifth lives.

Does anyone know the larger vessel below?  What’s barely legible on the bow is the name Maryland.  Photo was taken by Brian Hope between 1978 and 1984, and that info should make identification quite easy.  There’s a closer-up at the end of this post.

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Unrelated . . . but another vessel, currently in the UK, has also gone through a series of lives.

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Currently it’s on the Avon River near Bristol . . .  Its previous lives include the following

30-06-1916 Flora, Rotterdam;  18-11-1975 Zuiderzee, Urk; 1979/04/07 Zuiderzee, Enkhuizen; 22-08-1979 Zuiderzee, Steenbergen; 16-01-1980 Zuiderzee, Rotterdam; 1981/06/08 Zuiderzee, Maastricht; 1990/09/11 Gaby, Maastricht.  I’ve simplified the info a bit here;  the underlined words are towns of registry although in many cases the boat had multiple owners in the same town.

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Her previous life as a small tug is evident in her lines.

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Her current owner–Pete Totterdell–is looking for any more info and photos from her previous lives.  Further info from him:  “The boat was originally bought from Zaandam.  It has a Volvo Penta 117hp engine currently.  15m x 3.5m, Air draft 3m, depth draft 1.6m.  It was a was a working canal authority vessel.”

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Parting shot . . . closer-up of Maryland, whose current life and mine may cross paths in exactly one week.

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Thanks to Capt. Brian hope and Pete Totterdell for these photos.

 

Here was 8.  And here was yesterday.   The photo from yesterday–below–shows the near VZ Bridge footprint, and the far footprint can be seen

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here in a photo from a few weeks ago.    This morning, as I’m waking up, looks clear like the next few photos.

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It’s C. Angelo towing Sea Shuttle.  Part of the joy of photographing the same geography repeatedly is seeing the difference made by factors like weather and

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time of day.

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Here’s a dramatic weather photo taken somewhere in the Gulf of Mexico by Capt. Aeolus.  It reminds me of dramatic weather here . .  scroll through . .  from a “road fotos” post I did about three years ago.

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And speaking of the road . . .  I have some major gallivants coming up very soon.

Thanks to Aeolus for the photo above;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

or cousin or just compatriot . . . .   which would place this in what waterway?

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Waver Three is not my spelling, but  . . . someone else’s, for which I’ll add the link soon.

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But here’s the story.  The vessel in the photos above were sent to me recently by Niek  , a native of the Netherlands who followed the trail of love south to Argentina, where this vessel was recently refloated.  To see what Granadero (ex-Meta Ipland) looked like before being raised AND before sinking, click on this link and plod through the Spanish and German.  As a Dutchman living in Argentina, it’s easy to understand how Niek is interested in this century-old vessel built in his homeland.

Click on this link and then do a “find” for the term  ” salvemos al granadero”   and you’ll read an interview in which a Ruben Roderiguez is not happy that Waver three (sic) made it out of Rio de la Plata.

Some folks in Argentina are very proud of their maritime heritage, as evidence by this database of tall ships (A to L)  and  (M  to Z  ) that once operated there, including Granadero and Wavertree.

Good to know for us, the custodians of Wavertree.

Niek . ..  thanks for the photos and story.

 

If there are eight million stories in the naked city, then there are at least 80 million perspectives, and what I love about social media is the ability to share many more of these than can otherwise be seen.   Take this one . . . sent along yesterday by Jonathan Steinman.  Big Allis sets the location as about a half mile north of the bridge now named for Ed Koch.  And the vessel . . .  the current and VI version of Empire State on the first day . . . of Summer Sea Term 2014 and not yet out of its East River home waters.  Greets to all the cadets on deck enjoying the mild spring morning.  Click here for the previous versions of Empire State:  I   II    III    IV    V.

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And tailing . .  it looks like McAllister Girls.

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Around midday yesterday, Empire State was here (the blue icon off St George) and not quite 24 hours later,

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she’s off Montauk.

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The previous photo from Jonathan–which I never shared–was this, taken in midMarch.  If you’re not from the area, that’s the East River with Roosevelt Island making for a quite narrow channel.  That’s Shelby (of shuttle fame) and Freddy K Miller (ever morphing) team-pushing Weeks 533  (lifter of Sully’s ditched 1549).

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And if you’ve forgotten what my –and many others’ focus was in midMarch, it was

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salt!

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Many thanks to Jonathan for sharing these photos.

Here’s a photo I took almost four years ago of the SUNY Maritime training ship returning home from Summer Sea Term.

Call this a virtual gallivant . . . Mage Bailey, long-time reader and commenter here, traveled through the Panama Canal last month and sent these spectacular photos.

Let’s follow the nearer tug on MSC Kim‘s starboard stern quarter . . .

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Tug is Sajalices, CheoyLee built in 2011.

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One year older but otherwise built in the same yard . . . it’s Belen.

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Click here for a number of posts I did in Panama a few years ago.  By the way, MSC Kim today is somewhere in the Pacific;  she was last in the sixth boro in November 2013 . . . although as with most traffic in this harbor, I missed her.

Many many thanks to Mage Bailey for these photos.  More soon.

 

Today’s photos come compliments of Michael Torres, who previously shared this and this.  Michael . .  great to hear from you and get a glimpse of the west coast city of San Diego . . .

And who’s being feted here?

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It’s Reuben Lasker, a Wisconsin product and brand new NOAA fisheries research vessel getting a prismatic welcome from San Diego Harbor police less than two weeks ago.  Here’s some info on the namesake and the shipyard.

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Also in port is T-ATF-171, Sioux.  Here is one of the posts I did two years ago on a sister of Sioux, one in fact that was recently in my old haunts of Portsmouth, NH, to pick up  a sad tow.

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For scale, see Sioux here passing Nimitz and a gaggle of C-Tractors.

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Also in port around the same time, it’s USNS Montfort Point, aka T-MLP-1, mobile landing platform.  She can partially submerge to load/offload hovercraft and other heavy equipment.  In the distance you see John Glenn, a younger sibling, also built locally.  Michael suggests squinting to imagine seeing the tanker influences in their design.   Click here to see other NASSCO ships.

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And finally . . . for a Jones Act RORO with the best paint job . . . it’s Jean Anne.

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Many thanks to Michael for sending these photos from “somewhere different,” which will be an emerging theme here on tugster.

In fact, if you have great photos from your version of “somewhere different” or “something different,” please get in touch.

 

Bravo on the almost immediate and many correct identifications of the hulk in yesterday’s post.

Here’s an undated photo of SS Normandie in the sixth bork passing an unidentified Dalzell (?) tug.

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Photo from John Skelson . . . PT boat eastbound on the KVK.  Notice the onramp to the Bayonne Bridge in this and the next few photos.  Here’s a “hidden NJ” blogpost about Bayonne’s ELCO shipyard.  Here’s a list of vessels built there.

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From the same location, another of John’s photos . . .  destroyer, Great Lakes dredge, spectators,

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and Moran tugs.  Anyone add some info on the destroyer?

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Recognize the bridge?  This photo–from the New York City Archives, as are all the the rest here– is identified as taken in January 1937.  Whaling City then was a fishing vessel.  A vessel by that name operates today as a fast ferry.

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Notice 120 Wall Street.  This photo was taken January 1937 and shows F/V Charles B. Ashley.

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Not much info on this next set . . . . a dredge from a century ago and

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a survey vessel.

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And finally . . . this may be the last of my black/white photos . . . the sign tells all about the attitude of the value of salt marshes a half century ago and before . . .

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Thanks much to John Skelson for sharing his “family archives” photos, and if the fog over the sixth bork today has you staying indoors, go check out the New York City Municipal Archives online gallery.

 

Many thanks to John Skelson for sharing these photos . . .  and I’ll leave you guessing for a day or so.

Notice the vessel westbound in the background.  In the foreground, that’s Caddell’s with an Erie Lackawanna tug and a dilapidated ferry.    The mystery vessel is what’s in the background.

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The bridge needs no identification although the Bayonne shore in the background looks opener than it currently is.

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The number of tugs is just fabulous.

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And to return some color to the blog, here are Gary (right) and I sharing a beer after the show last night.  Thanks to all who attended and to the crews of five interesting documentaries.   I hope to see more of the festival Saturday and Sunday.

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Again, thanks much to John Skelson for sharing the mystery photos.  Now . .  please weigh in.

 

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My job . . . Summer 2014

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