You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘collaboration’ category.

Let’s start with LT-5 at the H. Lee White Maritime Museum.

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Here’s The Chancellor at the NYS Canals dry dock as it was being flooded.   Here’s a recent tugster post focused on this vessel.

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Now the marketing name for this “tug” is a “barge pusher.” 

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Here’s a closer up of the engine unit and hydraulic-driven thruster, operating near Rotterdam Junction.

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From Maraki in St. Eustatius . . .  it’s Triumph.   notice the submerged tug off to her port side.

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Here . . . tending the piledriver in Amsterdam is Sarah L_Anne . . .  I can’t quite make out the name.

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Also from Maraki, it’s Statia Reliant off the Leeward Islands of the Caribbean.

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Back to the waters just east of Lock 11, it’s Wm. Donnelly tending a scow.

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Thsnks to Ashley Hutto, this photo of Buccaneer, taken Tampa.

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And to end where we started . . .  it’s Oswego’s LT-5, accented by crepuscular rays.

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First, thanks to Andrea of I love upstate New York for use of this photo of the Oswego Harborfest fireworks.

The tug visible though is NOT Syracuse.  It’s Nash, which I’ve previously written about here.  Syracuse is somewhere in the darkness beyond Nash.

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The fireworks barges would not have been in position without Syracuse, here seen at launch over 80 years ago.

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Today she’s just a tug, not an antique vessel.  She just works;  she doesn’t demonstrate working.

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New York colors as seen in darkness and

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rain.

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Notie the logo on the t-shirt of the gentleman to the left . . .the same company that does the Macy’s July 4 show!!

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And on the lighthouse . . . a local expression of thanks.

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Again, thanks to Andrea for use of that top photo;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

Parrish . . .as in Maxfield Parrish . . . always painted skies like these  . . .

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although they never had robots on the horizon.

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And this is beautiful holopelagic weed.

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The photos come from a mariner minus moniker.

 

Yeah . . . so what is it?

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I don’t know, but I’ll wager it’s coming to a dock near here soon . . .

 

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Many thanks for this photo to a secret salt.

Hawsepiper Paul is writing about this subject all along, as you might expect since he lives most of his days on a bunker barge.

Indulge me a bit as I elaborate on these adventures, as captured in photos by Tony A, starting with this one. When does a New York port of registry seem out of place?

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I’d say when it’s painted onto a vessel never or rarely seen in New York, and of course I know that with flags of convenience . . . anything is possible with arcane finagling.

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To appear to digress a little bit more, Marcus G Langseth is to 2014 as Robert G Conrad was to –say– 1980.  Conrad is a photo I copied from Seth Tane‘s archives a little over a year ago when I did the “fifth dimension” series on the sixth boro.

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Langseth is currently working off Atlantic City, one of its nearer peregrinations.

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Anyhow, about two weeks ago Tony A and Patrick Sky got to deliver fuel to this international wanderer.

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A little over an hour later, Patrick Sky, feeling much lighter, pulls away from this dock underneath Throgs Neck  (which autocorrect insists should be spelled “throb’s neck,” but that would take us into adventures in spell auto correcting, which I’d much rather avoid.

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Many thanks to Tony A and to Seth Tane for use of these photos.   Happy scientific gallivanting for LDEO, Marcus G Langseth named for this Tennessee-born earth scientist.

 

Here was 29.  (The apostrophe is making me lose count.)

Below . . . just in this morning from Ashley Hutto . .  call this “can’t sleep ’til I get to Brooklyn.”

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From Jason Padgett high above Broad Street about a week and a half ago, part of a submarine on a barge entering the East River, and

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from Jonathan Steinman, the same unit a little farther up the East River.  A little over two years ago, Birk Thomas took these of a similar cargo.

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And from a secret salt . . . some months back, it MAY be the same tug as seen in dry dock but what would be a submarine perspective.

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From along the Maas and taken by Fred Trooster last week, it’s the restored tug Elbe.

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From another secret salt . . . these are sixth boro waters to be kept in mind whenever you’re tempted to swim here.

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The world is full of secret salts, another of whom sent this photo of Louisiana vessel with an intriguing name.

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And finally, a photo I took . . . of a scrapyard with an alarming name, until you accept that it might be another language.

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Thanks much to Ashley, Jason, Jonathan, Fred, and all the secret salts who send me photos.   And finally . . . a photo I took myself, and I’ll leave you to guess where, a photo that goes along with an article Elizabeth sent me recently about an invasive species in Colombia.

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Boston Navy Yard, February 1932 and launch day.  Click here to see the context.

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Grand River at Grand Haven, February 1907.

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82 years later, the same vessel as the top one and now known as Seneca, pushes Tender #10 eastbound just east of Oneida Lake.

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107 years later than the second photo above, H. J. Dornbos, now known as Urger awaits dry-docking between Locks 2 and 3 in Waterford last week.  For a sense of how Urger looks high and defy, click here.

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Enjoy these additional shots from Seneca‘s wheelhouse.

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Here’s the story, and

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here’s what the 1960ish waterways of New York State looked like.

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Click here for an article on an international set of passengers Seneca has recently carried;  ditto here for an fall 2013 article an Seneca.

Thanks to William Lafferty for the 1907 Dornbos image.

Off the Japanese coast?

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Isn’t that Patrick Sky?  Has she been boarded?

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Nah . . . Patrick is just bunkering the Japanese Coast Guard Kojima on its annual trip through the sixth boro.

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Click here and here for photos of Kojima’s previous visits.

Many thanks to  . . .was it Tony?  . . . for these great pics.

Pulling the plug?

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Trying to put it back before the sixth boro drains away?  Freeing a fouled conning tower on an experimental North Korean  submarine?  Attempting a descent into a rumored rabbit hole?  Performance artist?  Very small bobber tender preparing for a large fish to bite?   Got a better caption?

Thanks for this photo sent by a secret salt . . .

Bergen Point, a 1958 Blount product,  coming through the Narrows last weekend.  Click here for many interesting vessels from Blount that have appeared on this blog.

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And a first timer on this blog . . . John Parrish.

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Penn No. 4 all painted white . . . click here and scroll through to see her in PennMaritime gray.

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Bluefin . .  still in PennMaritime gray . . . or is that primer?

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Maryland . . . with reflections.

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If my search window serves me right, then this is the first appearance of Katie G. McAllister on this blog.

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This is definitely the first appearance of Pelican State here.  The photo of this Great Lakes Dredge & Dock boat is here thanks to Mike and Michele Mcmorrow.

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And thanks to Mage, here’s Esti and

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Cerro Jefe.

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A previous view here  of Emily Ann had her as Solomon Sea.

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Brian Nicholas at work in Great Kills.  Click here (scroll through) to see her as both Banda Sea and Brian Nicholas.

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And finally . . . it’s the mystery tug Elbe when it was Maryland Pilot boat Maryland.  At its stern is its predecessor, Baltimore.  I haven’t found out much about Baltimore.  Any help?  About Maryland, Capt. Brian Hope–who shared this photo, said this, “In 1985 and MARYLAND was donated to Greenpeace.  She was a great boat, but too expensive to operate. She had a crew of 18, plus a chief steward.  The crew worked two weeks on and two weeks off, so that, counting the steward, we had a total of 37 crew.   When we went ashore that was reduced to about 21 and our fuel, repair and food costs dropped dramatically as well.   I am very glad to see that she has been preserved (in Maassluis).  She’s a great boat!”  Thanks to a generous reader, here’s an article about her sea trials.

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When next I post, I hope to share photos Elbe in her restored glory.

Sorry to miss NYC’s fleet week again.

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My job . . . Summer AND Fall 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

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Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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