You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Buchanan Marine’ category.

But first . . . it’s a race, and there are trophies for such categories as best-looking, best mascot, best tattooed crew person . . .  .  And there is pushing and jostling, for which there are no trophies.  But what would you call this?

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Step back a hundred and some feet . . . and clearly it’s USAV MGen Anthony Wayne LT-803, 5100 hp, and delivered from what is now  VT Halter Marine in June 1993.  Off her port side is Eric R. Thornton.

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From l to r, lining up are Meagan Ann, Houma, Bering Sea, a little of Robert E. McAllister, Buchanan 1, Mister T, and Emily Ann.  

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Here’s a view of Robert E.’s business end under way.

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Mako III seemed to carry a different name last year.   It began life as an Army ST, although I don’t know what number she carried.  66, perhaps?

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And they were off.  Fells Point, the nearest vessel, is likely the newest boat in the race.

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More photos later.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is grateful to NYMedia Boat and Bjoern Kils for getting the best positions for photography during the sixth boro’s premiere Labor Day event, the 22nd annual Great North River Race organized by the Working Harbor Committee, who also deserve a big round of applause.

Two questions you might have are . .  why does the Army have boats, and who was MGen Anthony Wayne?  Here are links A and B to answer the first part–please add detail if you know it–and here’s the info on General Wayne, sometimes called “mad General Wayne.”

From midday . .  til dusk.  Here between Morris Canal and Battery Park City, Gabby heads south.

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Mister T mightily pulls six scows here between

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the Williamsburg and the Manhattan Bridges.

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Near midtown on the East River, there’s an eastbound unit and a westbound one.

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Westbound, it’s Cheyenne moving crushed cars, and

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and–eastbound– Captain Zeke with petro product.  By the way, Captain Zeke was moving faster than the uncrushed cars on the highway in the distance, probably because of some unintentional crushing that had happened.

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From near Hell Gate now, looking back at Captain Zeke, what a moody city!!

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

It’s snowing in the sixth boro now, but Sunday–between threatening clods–it looked like this.

Let’s start with Discovery Coast and GCS 236.

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Shelby passing Grace D of

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D & G Launch Service . . .

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Buchanan 12, again light . . .

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And a close up of Discovery Coast . . .

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and another ending with Robbins Reef Light, which looked like this in 1951.

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All fotos taken on Sunday by Will Van Dorp, who hopes you can come to the auction at Noble Maritime this Friday evening.

Barney Turecamo with barge Georgia  and

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Buchanan 12 light, under the same wintry sky.  The last time I saw the 12 was back when tugster last took a swimming day.  I’d love to see the high and dry hulls of Barney and Mary.

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Franklin Reinauer and Taft Beach leaving Erie Basin and

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Franklin here refueling with Ruth M.

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Robert E. McAllister, passing where warehouses are being transformed into park equipment and

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Passing the cranes at the former Military Ocean terminal it’s Mary Gellatly and headed the other way

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Marjorie B. McAllister.

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Joyce D. Brown westbound past IMTT and here a few minutes later Joyce with

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Meredith C. Reinauer right behind.

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Shelby slings some barges and

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magnificent Maryland –as seen from a low angle–made to the dock.

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A Vane unit . . . I don’t recall and can’t identify . . . a few minutes after sunrise.

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All fotos taken the past month by Will Van Dorp.

I had a chance to see Orange Blossom depart the sixth boro this morning, but since our current January light is so monochromatic, I thought to take on the tugboat/towboat question.  Having said that, I’ve always considered Buchanan 12 (last one here) and Glen Cove (seventh foto here) as river tugboats or pushboats.   Odin, depicted at the end of this post and possibly still in the Kirby yard in Houston, also has some towboat characteristics.

Olga  G. Stone, big pushknees and little if any sheer . . . .

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without a winch or H-bit . . . definitely a towboat.

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Barbara E. Bouchard and in the lift Edwin N. Bisso . . .  as definitely tugboats

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Admiral Jackson . . . tugboat.

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J. W. Herron . . . towboat, and I’d love to see her high and dry hull lines.

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Ned Ferry . . . tug.   Here’s Ned Ferry with Sanko Venture, recently somewhat curiously rendered by bowsprite.

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This unidentified Florida Marine vessel with tow is a towboat . . . .  Note how the length of the tow

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seems quite lengthened when you get a profile.  Also notice the dance as the ferry Louis B. Porterie sashays between the two tows.

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John Williams . . .  towboat.

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Ditto Alley Cat,  Stone Power, 

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and Jerry Aragon.

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This one I don’t see enough of to identify.

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For nostalgia’s sake . . . a foto of Odin in the KVK . . . circa 2007.

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All fotos above by Will Van Dorp.  For some great towboat fotos check Boat Photo Museum and Ohio River Blog, recently added to my blogroll.  Also, an excellent site is Dick’s Towboat Gallery.  For more on the difference between tugs and towboats from TES, click here.

When I posted about the race last year, I recapped the five previous years posts too.  See that here for part a and here for part b.

The day started early for me;  here at 07:01, not knowing I’d see her later in the morning, I passed Weddell Sea in the notch.

By 07:47, I was in the McAllister yard, thanks to Harold Tartell and of course the McAllisters.  Maurania III, also in last year’s race, will be the ride.

By 09:50, we were off Pier 84;  W. O. Decker and Meagan Ann were already there.

Aound then, Debora, Susan, and Shawn Miller lined up for a family shot.

At 10:01, it’s Pegasus and  . . .lo and behold . . . Weddell Sea has come out of the notch in the Upper Bay anchorage to join in the festivities.

I’ve never even seen this Little Toot. . .  out of Highlands, NJ, and she’s not so little.

10:06 . . .  Quantico Creek, Buchanan 1, Vulcan III, and Debora Miller begin to line up with us for the parade past Pier 84.

And when Weddell Sea and especially Lincoln Sea mingle with other boats, their size is apparent.  …  8000 hp, Lincoln Sea, appeared in K-Sea colors in the 2006 race.

10:43 some of the boats have turned around and waiting for the  race to begin . . .  the tide is flooding, adverse.

10:45 . . . note the two dark green tugs Gage Paul Thornton and Thornton Bros. still needing to turn around, as does

Freddie K Miller.  

If my camera clock is correct, the race started at 10:47, and

tomorrow I’ll get you the results.

It was great meeting/catching up with so many folks today, and again . . . thanks to Harold and McAllister towing for getting me on Maurania III.

Many thanks to Paul Strubeck for this foto of a preserved “results report” he has . . .   from a 60-year-old typewriter!  A week from today Working Harbor Committee is sponsoring a great event they call the 20th annual North River Tugboat Race, but clearly there have been more than 19 prior races involving the machinery of the New York City towing industry.  How many races have been held?  Going in “order of completion,” I’ve managed to find fotos of  #2 finisher Barbara Moran and #3  Socony 11 (later Dorothy Elizabeth, shown here racing again in 2007) from Birk and Harold’s site.   Also, here’s a foto of a model of #1 Shamokin.  And a foto from eBay of Wm. J. Tracy.    Finally, here’s a quite forlorn foto of Dalzelleader late in her life.  That leaves me without images of finishers 5, 6, and 7:  Dauntless 14, Russell 17 and Turecamo Girls of that vintage.

Thanks to Charlie Gallo for sending this foto of Mister T (2001) from the east end of the East River, a section of the sixth boro that I’ve inadvertently ignored.    I’ve no idea who the T is Mister T is. Behind the bridge is SUNY Maritime’s Empire State.  Thanks, Charlie.

In fact, I’m always looking for new perspectives, like this one from a week ago over southwest Bayonne, showing McAllister Sisters and Ellen McAllister docking Golden Gate Bridge, with Bebedouro and Islander (I think) in the distance.  Also, in the foreground, it’s drillboat Kraken.

One of the details of ships is their names, like this quite intriguing one.

From a similar aerial perspective, enjoy Turecamo Girls (1965).

How about an unexpected angle on a frequent subject of this blog, Gramma Lee T Moran, running here with an outbound Carnival Glory.

The T in Gramma Lee T is for Tregurtha.   Gramma Lee has this other vessel named for her as well.  She was the wife of Paul Tregurtha, a name that you might know from Ken or Isaac’s blog posts on Interlake Steamship Company vessels.

I spotted one such vessel from Badger earlier this week.  Behold barge Pathfinder and tug Dorothy Ann.

Barge Pathfinder used to be a boat:  J. L. Mauthe. 

Boat-turned-barge Pathfinder now has a detachable engine called Dorothy Ann (1998).

As the person behind this blog, I want to step back a bit and thank you all for reading what I post, looking at the fotos, commenting, and sometimes correcting my errors.  I’ve enjoyed doing the blog for almost six years and will continue.

More SS Badger soon.

These fotos taken since last Wednesday show part of the range of weather we’ve had since Wednesday.  And here’s a surprise:  Crowley’s Courage in the Stapleton anchorage . . . as of this writing, she’s off Florida halfway between Jacksonville and Miami.

Lincoln Sea, same day, off BAT, just before that wicked storm erupted . . .  derupted/descended . . .     Great pics at that link.

Buchanan 10 was making her way across the Upper Bay as

the wind started to kick up some splash.   Did I get wet?  Yup . . . but I always carry a dry bag for stuff that dislikes water.   And I was afraid of getting zapped by the electricity in the sky as I walked home from the subway.  Yup . . .  tugster on the subway..  Hey . .  . parts of the subway lines allow me to travel beneath the sixth boro without a submarine, as depicted by Duke Riley.

Here’s Siberian Sea, also on Wednesday.

Saturday morning light was quite different, after more than two days of rain.  D . . . I hope that answers your question about shooting through glass.  This was the huge 12,000 hp OSG Vision pushing OSG 350 westbound on the KVK yesterday morning.   Given what ATBs work the Great Lakes, I’m wondering about the claim here that Vision, a year even, was the world’s largest ATB unit.    On this foto, I’m also shooting into the morning sun.

Here Wicomico passes MSC Federica.  Notice the white structure atop the containers (left of the turbine) on Federica.

Here’s a close-up.  Anyone else notice it?   . . . identify it?

Beaufort Sea passes Zim San Francisco.

By the way, what are those blue “seaco” units on San Fran‘s deck?  Also notice the sailboat up there on the load!!  Doubleclick enlarges.

Rounding out this post, my till-favorite large tug in the sixth boro . . .  Atlantic Salvor,  just a bit over half the hp of OSG Vision, not that hp tells the whole story.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated to this post but related to the major focus of this blog:  I’ve adding the comment by R. A. Pena because it may please you and some of you may be prompted to research it.  His note follows: with a bit of editing by me”

we owe our life to the captn and crew of tug boat CABO ROJO; they saved us from capsizing on 13 of may 1966 on rough weather crossing from cuba to florida; will never forget them; our boat was a 17 footer; l was 18 yrs old at the time.   now at 66 l would like to have a photo of the ship or his crew. god bless them and god bless america.  note at the time of our rescue tugboat CABO ROJO was pulling 3 barges behind it with molasses on a trip from puerto rico to new orleans.  who was to tell that  [our] faint far away light was seen in the distance.  it was going to be our salvation. thanks a million captn god bless. tugboat CABO ROJO and his crew. r .a. pena vero beach fl. 7-22-2012. note our boat the ANITA was abandoned to the mercy of the sea due to certain circumstances; every time l remember seeing it fade away under the lights of the reflectors of tugboat CABO ROJO l can’t stop tears . thanks again for saving our life. gratefully yours r.a pena”

 

Mr. Pena . . . thanks for writing the wonderful note.  I hope we can find a foto of CABO ROJO operating between PR and Nola in 1966.

This foto, and some others here,  comes thanks to Xtian, who had a question about a model he’s building a few weeks ago.  I hope someone can help.   This drydock foto shows Abeille Liberté , which assisted in the salvage of MSC Napoli five years back.  I’m guessing this is irrelevant, but “abeille” is the French word for “bee,” as in … the critter that makes honey and stings.  This hull is nothing if not sweet yet efficient.  As of this writing, Abeille Liberté  is at the dock in Cherbourg.

I’m always looking for outatowners or “never-before-seen”s in the sixth boro.  C. Angelo 

fits that description.    Here’s what Birk and Harold  had to say about her.  I got this foto Sunday, and the turbine WAS spinning.

Back to Xtian fotos,  Marseillais 6 is Voith propulsion tug based in greater Marseille.

Abeille Flandre is based east of Marseille in Toulon.

Here’s another of the same size and mission:  Abeille Languedoc. As of this writing Abeille Languedoc is docked in Boulogne-sur-Mer, just west of the Calais/Dover crossing point in the Channel.

I believe that since this foto was taken, Tenax has lost these hues of blue–can I call one of them “cerulean”–for orange and white.  Here’s another blue shot, with sibling vessels.

Finally, from Xtian, Baltic Warrior–built in Poland West Germany* in 1964– towing a disabled Eleousa Trikoukiotisa to Malta, where she remains.  As of this writing, Baltic Warrior is docked in Ramsgate.  * means see Xtian’s comment.  Baltic Warrior was originally Bugsier 26;  here’s Bugsier (Hamburg)’s current fleet.

Back to my  fotos, this is a Kirbified Viking.

Amy C McAllister and McAllister Responder race out the toward the Narrows and beyond, as

does Buchanan 12.  Given that Buchanan 12 often pushes a half dozen or more stone scows, I’d could easily squint and tell myself she’s pushing Swinburne Island closer to New Jersey.

All fotos by either Herrou Xtian or Will Van Dorp.

Abeille International is a division of Boubon International. Here’s their fleet.

Actually that title captures 98% of this blog’s +1800 posts.  And just as elsewhere in Gotham or anywhere else, so on the sixth boro what work you see depends entirely on your station.  And my station this particular day was Tchefuncte River’s  Equitable Equipment‘s hull # 1428, delivered in August 1966 as Red Star Towing‘s New Haven.  Now she’s Freddie K. Miller;  I took the foto below just over five years ago when she was Stapleton Service.    I use this foto here because a downside of being on the tow is my inability to get a foto OF the tow.

At 0520 hrs, dawn was sweetest and coolest, from this point a mile south of Miller’s Launch.  When I reported at 0530, the Miller’s yard was already busy.

The crew of Freddie K Miller’s had a job: pick up Weeks Crane Barge 552 and its crew and proceed to the East River ConEd.  By 0615, crew was making the tow.

0645 we were crossing west to east across the Upper Bay.  Buchanan 1 was towing a scow  and

Douglas B. Gurion headed west for passengers.  The ferry is named for a victim of September 11.

0715 . ..  near Red Hook container port, we passed this ex-MSC vessel Transatlantic.  I will post more MSC soon.

0730 . . . we had passed under the Brooklyn Bridge and now could feast on this potpourri of  Manhattan skyline.  Side by side on the right are Gehry’s flowing-facade 8 Spruce (2011) and Gilbert’s spiky-tower (1913).

0745 . . . we pass GMD Shipyard, where morning shift has already started its work on Massachusetts Maritime’s TS Kennedy  (1967).

0815 . . . the crew have tied to the ConEd dock and Weeks’ crew has begun setting the spuds, for stability as the load is transferred.  My very general understanding of this load is that ConEd purchased equipment from  Manufacturer M.  Company A trucked it to the Weeks yard because installation by land (by Company B) was less feasible than installation from water.  Miller’s job was to move equipment on crane barge to ConEd so that Weeks–with collaboration from Company B–could set equipment exactly where it will be used.

0915 . . . first equipment is lifted and rotated over the East River counterclockwise to avoid obstacles on land, and at

0920 . . .  crew guides unit into exact location.  If half an inch off, then lift and get it right.

1010 . . . next piece of equipment is moved.   While the tug stands by with the crane barge, Miller crew does fine carpentry work in wheelhouse.

Since my self-appointed job is to record details, check out Carolina IV, sailing westbound on the East river . . . hailing from Stockholm,  Yes, sailing!  and  . . . yes . . . that Stockholm while

eastbound are Gage Paul Thornton and a floatplane.

1115 . . . heavy-duty pipe elbow gets lifted into place. Tower protruding from the building just right of MetLife is Chrysler Building.

1215 . . . the spuds are up,  the crane boom lowered and secured, Freddie K Miller has spun off the dock and now heads back westbound for the Weeks yard.  If the grayish vessel in the foreground is locally known as a “honey boat,” then this has to be one of the sweetest scenes possible in these parts.

1300 . . . as we approach the Weeks yard we cross Buchanan 12 towing three stone scows, possibly headed for a quarry up the Hudson.

1330 . . . Freddy K Miller is now “light,” having left the barge at the Weeks yard.  Ever Decent is outbound for sea, and by this writing is southbound off Cape Hatteras.

Meanwhile, close to Manhattan, Asphalt Star takes on bunker fuel from a Vane barge.  That black hose . . . that’s like the hose at the pump where you fill your car tank.

By 1400, I’ve said my thanks to the crew of Freddy K Miller —who await their next job on this or another vessel–and the dispatcher, and take a break to examine a familiar sight:  Alice, she who inspired my first ever blogpost!!

Back on the bank and before heading home, I get another shot;  she’s loaded deep with her Canadian aggregates.

Imagine my delight, then, later that day getting a foto from Mike C. of Alice Oldendorff north of the Navy Yard self-unloading her cargo of crushed stone.

Many thanks to all the folks at Miller’s Launch.  Also, thank you Mike for sending along this last foto.  All other fotos by Will Van Dorp.

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My job . . . Summer AND Fall 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

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Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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