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Of course, there is Tilly, seen afloat here just  a few weeks before she was allowed to sink near Key West.

And then there are a set of ice yachts, built in the Bronx but not listed on this website, although I’m not sure why.

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And then there was sub chaser PC-1264–two dozen projects BEFORE Tilly, sold for scrap but never scrapped.

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Close up of 1264 starboard at low tide.

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A view of her port side . . . three years ago.   But if you go decades farther back in products of the Bronx, there is

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this!!  Here’s an article from a 1916 issue of Power Boating (scroll to p. 37) on the Speedway products of the Consolidated in the Bronx.  Besides Consolidated, the Bronx also had Kyle & Purdy and

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Here’s a Bronx product of Lyon-Tuttle shipyard, previously Kyle & Purdy.

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And here’s another . . .

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who snapped the last three photos above at the Antique Boat Museum in Clayton NY, a must-see for anyone interested in recreational boats.

And although this is a bit late, I’ll be at the midtown main branch of the New york Public Library this evening with Gary Kane to show and discuss our documentary . . . Graves of Arthur Kill.

 

Springtime . . . and motion gives a renewed sense of life to the watery boro.  Emerald Sea‘s been around all winter, but she’s not moved loads like this.  Diner?  Prefab beach buildings for post-Sandy reconstruction?  Many thanks to Ashley Hutto for this shot taken along Roxbury, Queens.

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Eclipse, the huge yacht in the distance has taller masts than Clipper City, the tallest sailing vessel operating in the the harbor.  Eclipse left the harbor Tuesday, headed for Gibraltar.

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Schooner Virginia left Wednesday, headed for Virginia . . . by way of Portland, Maine.

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Anyone know the manufacturer of the speedboat in the foreground?  In the background is Zephyr, launched 10 years ago from the Austal Shipyard in Mobile, AL . . . and Wavertree, launched 128 years ago in Southampton, UK.

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I could almost imagine this boat has a bowsprit.

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Smaller workboats seem more commonplace this time of year like Henry Hudson,

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this Oyster Bay government boat,

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an OCC vessel,

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and of course the ubiquitous all-weather sludge tanker North River, frequently mentioned on this blog.

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Thanks to Ashley for the first foto, and I’d love to know what that structure on the Weeks barge is.  All other fotos by Will Van Dorp, who feels the urge to go somewhere too.

The title comes from St. Exupery.

Where is this 32′ x 5′ Cornish pilot gig emerging out of okoume?  (Doubleclick enlarges most fotos.)

In the sixth boro of course, in fact on Pier 40.  If you were to bore through the floor and lower your toes, they’d feel the chill of Hudson River water in late winter.   Pier 40 is partly used as parking, athletic fields for budding athletes of all sorts, and docking for fireboats and historic vessels.  There even used to be a trapeze school on the roof.  Hmm, maybe one of these days a digression will prompt me to put more trapeze fotos up.  But I went to Pier 40 this weekend to witness the tremendous efforts of the Village Community Boathouse,

where the Cornish gig is under construction, and where some thirty 26′ Whitehall gigs have been built.

What is a gig, a rowing gig?  Click here for dozens of fotos.

The lines on these boats–with only slight modification–date to a rowing race in the sixth boro in 1824!!  Yes, 1824 when a sixth boro gig called American Star beat a British gig called Dart, racing with 50,000 spectators on the waterfront, an event commemorated annually.  and not recalled solely in New York!   Oh . .  about that 50,000-spectator number . .  NY’s population back then was less than 200,000!   25% of the city never turns out for a baseball or basketball game . . .

An interesting twist in the American Star Whitehall boat story is that it was presented to General Lafayette in 1825 (?)  and has remained in France since then.  Mystic’s John Gardner took the lines off the American Star and constructed a replica, which in turn led to the design of the boats in various NYC community boating programs.

Check out the Village Community Boathouse blog here.   By the way, let’s cheer them on at the Snow Row (and Snow Ball) coming up in two weeks.  Here’s a video of the Snow Row 2010 sans snow.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

This foto comes compliments of Lauren Tivey, a poet from Vermont College of Fine Arts.  Question:  where/what?   Note the person in doorway just behind the lion “figurehead.”  Answer below.

Since my goal here is to post unexpected fotos, enjoy this shot of the befigured Patty Nolan, a unique tug itself towing something different last summer.

Behold the sixth boro’s own Dal Lake or Sausalito or Lake Union.    Guess where?

Behold the glorious Gowanus!

And some of its exotic fauna.

These last three fotos come compliments of intrepid paddler Vladimir Brezina, whose fotos have appeared here, among other places.

Lauren’s foto at the top is a restaurant on a barge on West Lake in Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province . . . just south of Shanghai.

Doubleclick enlarges.  Note the NYC skyline above the Staten Island horizon to the right.

Baykeeper the organization uses this 30′ skiff made with

cedar planks over oak

frames as their patrol craft.

See the builder’s name stamped into metal on the upper left.  The Pedersen family has built wooden skiffs in Keyport (pearl of the Raritan Bayshore)  for three generations.  This Star Ledger article from a few years back shows work in the Pedersen shop.

The top foto comes thanks to Andy Willner;  the others by Will Van Dorp.  NY/NJ Baykeeper has a Facebook page, as does American Littoral Society.

Related:  Riverkeeper also has a wooden patrol boat, I. Ian Fletcher, which I wrote about here back in 2008.

Lots of references to Keyport and Raritan Bay can be found in Mark Kurlansky’s The Big Oyster, which I’m rereading.  I’ve also recently read Jack Jeandron’s Keyport.

To follow on posts earlier this month featuring fishing vessels in North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, I offer a vessel that operates in New Jersey and New York, right in the sixth boro in fact.  Miss Callie is less than 60′ loa and more than 30 years old.  Here a bit more than a week ago, she worked just off Ellis Island, and

in January 2010, Miss Callie last season just off Bayonne’s MOT.  How would you  imagine her homeport?

Less than 15 miles from the Narrows, Miss Callie and

a whole other fleet

reside on the

mostly hidden

banks of Comptons Creek, which flows into Raritan Bay.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who thinks you’ll enjoy spending a half hour to watch this short video on building a Sea Bright skiff.  More great accents, too, esp. starting about 15 minutes in, along with interesting references to post-Volstead Act activities.   Here’s an article about another Jersey shore boat builder.

More surprises tomorrow.

Both my parents spoke with accents that marked them as from “away.”  When I’m “away,” my accent advertises that fact.  Accents vary from locality to the next (Outer Banks or  Tangier Island in the same way that boat designs–or at least names of designs– might.   Take an arbitrary  (maybe)  400-mile (as the gull glides) stretch of East Coast:  Southport, NC to Crisfield, MD.

Let’s start with Elbert Felton, master of Solomon T,  who generously invited me aboard his 1938 restored workboat, and

after giving me a short tour of Southport harbor, agreed to do “donuts” so I could foto Solomon T from all angles.   Notice Oak Island Light

in the background.

Solomon T and Alice Belle share some of the same lines;  Alice Belle retains the mast Solomon T once had.  Any guesses on Alice Belle‘s  build date?

You’re right if you said 1946.  Here’s another shot of Alice Belle.

About 150 miles up the Banks, I caught this other shot of Koko coming in from the Hatteras Inlet.  Although Koko is registered in Hatteras, her boatwright is listed as Leland F. Helmstetter, Jr., based some 200 miles farther north in Virginia’s Eastern Shore.

Mr. Helmstetter is also listed as builder of Bay Raider, also on the Eastern Shore.  I took this foto and the

next in Harborton, VA.  From Harborton, it’s a dozen or so miles through Little Hell to Onancock, home of John Mo’s fantastic Mallard’s Restaurant for absolutely fabulous crabcakes.

From Onancock, you can head up through Bullbegger up to the Crisfield, MD, once called “sea food capital of the world.”  Read all about it in William Warner’s 1977 Pulitzer-winning Beautiful Swimmers.    The boats below . . . are examples of the  Chesapeake Bay deadrise, as I would say is Koko, no matter where she works.

Hear more on blue crab life cycle here.

Here’s another.   For more closeups on the crab business in Crisfield, click here.

In the short time I visited, I saw no Hooper Island draketails, and there must be other types out there, for another day.  For now, last shot, also in Crisfield, a pushboat with an outboard.

All fotos here by Will Van Dorp, who can’t wait to return to this 400-miles stretch.

For now, enjoy an accent from the edge of the sixth boro.  Or one like my parents had.  Finally, here’s a short video on the accents of five of the NYC boros;  as anyone who listens to the VHF knows, the sixth boro has thousands of accents from everywhere.

Hmmm . . .  heading downeast from here would be another great place to document workboat designs and accents.

Mystic, to quote Soundbounder, is “Disneyland for [proud] water rats” and  thrills even the dogs, at least water dogs.  Can you figure out what’s happening here?

Kingston II was launched in 1937 after being assembled by apprentice welders at Electric Boat.

 Amazon (an 1885 screw schooner) graces Mystic with her beauty until her lightning-charred electronics are repaired.  Just beyond her with the wildly raked masts is Amistad, also in for repairs.Amazon (83′ waterline x 15′ beam) embodies  long and lean.

Breck Marshall, a Crosby catboat, sails like a dream. 

Mina is a sweet “launchetta” from exactly a century ago.

Growler leaves early on Columbus Day. 

Be-puddinged garvey with dory and high-and-dry whaleship  Morgan.

And the dog question . . . John Paul (launched 1967, ex-Katrina, Nickie B, and U. T. 1) , moored for part of weekend, had a blueclaw on a piece of fendering designed to allow assisting of submarine.  Dog saw crab and became so curious it nearly tried walking on water. 

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  More on some of these vessels soon.

I’ve not used this title since May.  But Mary K. Adella begs some well-deserved attention.

At this site, Ken Brockway,  owner and builder,  has thoroughly documented the creation of his vessel.  The only thing I didn’t find was the origin of the steamer’s name.  Thank for the site, Ken;  it could serve as an inspiration for someone looking to take on a project for several years.  Small craft maybe, but big accomplishment.

Hestia, written about here and in other posts, glanced over at a kindred spirit whenever Mary K. Adella passed, breathing heavily, as only steamers can.   The green work boat got some attention here.

Earlier in September, I caught this foto of William H working over near the Tappan Zee Bridge.    For more, click here and scroll about 3/4 through, enjoying all the other survey boats along the way.

Last one, I looked long and hard at the boat name on this white fiberglass stern–HOTel cORAL esSEX–and just didn’t get it.  It didn’t work for me;  I thought it was the name of a place or a song.

Win a few, lose a few …. oh well.  I suppose whoever writes this on a boat doesn’t get it either.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

It’s not that the sixth boro or other northeast locations do not see beautiful wood (my fav is the cornucopia in the 10th foto down);  the wood here only comes out on special occasions, like fine china and silver.  On the Salish Sea, especially around Lake Union, wooden boats seem to be more numerous than fiberglass, and it wasn’t even a special “wooden boat” event.

I start with this nameless vessel (and I think it’s wood) because the “golden hour” image intrigues me.  Remember, doubleclick enlarges, and each caption relates to the foto below.

Swietenia” is part of the scientific name for mahogany.

Aiga

Nameless from my point of view and un-selfconscious.

Aquarama

Nameless and high and dry.

Nameless and back in fresh water east of and on the high side of the Chittenden locks.

1950? Auklet

Nameless but lovely with a blue top.

Ditto.  Having owned a mahogany and teak Owens once, which I unsuccessfully returned to its former glory, I can appreciate what is involved in maintenance of these aging beaties.

“Seattle’s most famous wooden motor yacht,” the 1924 Westward . . . . then 1940 Twin Isles, then namelesss blue peer.

Sea Witch is likely not wood, but a classic nonetheless.  Click here and scroll for a sixth boro version.

Of course, Seattle and Lake Union are famous for floating homes.  Check out these prices.

The fotos I took of the one with a swing out front, where a stringbikinied woman frolicked, were ohs0blurry, but I love this design, which

brings me to this closerup version of a foto from a few days back.  Note the design on the bow.  Click here for closerup fotos of the Tulalip rowers on their journey.

Speaking of Lake Union, while there, twice I was told about a transit system there, South Lake Union Transit.  Oh, you have to click here for the unofficial slogan.

Space for another wooden Lake Union vessel, the venerable Arthur Foss.

And drifting a bit offtopic but fascinating . . .   Mount Rainier . . .  who was Rainier?  Would you believe a former enemy combatant?

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Also unrelated but thanks to Captain JP, I write like . .  David Foster Wallace.  See JP’s post and paste in your own text.

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My job . . . Summer AND Fall 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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