You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Blount Marine’ category.

Here’s my last canal ruins post, this one focusing on vestiges of the corridor as a dynamic industrial hub.  Day Peckinpaugh, delivered as cargo ship Interwaterways 101 in May 1921 is certainly not in ruins, as her younger sister–by two months–

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Interwaterways 105 has been since 1976, here disintegrating in the Arthur Kill.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Below the photo shows the dock in Rome where Day Peckinpaugh used to offload cement.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The Mohawk banks in Amsterdam . . . once a major location for carpet and rug making . . . now hold silent factories.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Not having been up the bank here, I can’t say whether Fownes still makes gloves here.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

On the south side of the Oneida River, docks exist where no supply barges have called in many years.  Anyone help with info on when supplies last arrived in Clay via barge?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

. . . or here not far north of Onandaga Lake?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I don’t know the number of bridges for pedestrians, trains, or automobiles that cross the canal, but this one clearly remains as scrap and carries no traffic of any sort.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Which brings us back to the Duluth-built younger sister of Day Peckinpaugh, also depicted near the beginning of this post.  I’d always wondered about Duluth, thinking it an unlikely location for construction of vessels that came to work on the canal.  But maybe it isn’t.  President Wilson created the US Railroad Administration (USRA) in December 1917, federalizing the railroads of the US as well as the Erie Canal.  Wilson placed the USRA in the hands of his son-in-law W. G. McAdoo, who soon thereafter nationalized strategic inland waterways including the Erie Canal and placed them in the hands of a Duluth shipping executive G. A. Tomlinson.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

To reiterate what I said at the beginning, Day Peckinpaugh is not among the ruins along the canal although its future role is under study.  Meanwhile, neither is ship tourism along the canal dead, as evidenced by Grande Caribe approaching from Peckinpaugh‘s stern.  Click here for more pics of Grande Caribe.

0aaaarc20

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

0aaaaur0aaaaur10aaaaur30aaaaur40aaaaur50aaaaur20aaaaur99

Remind me some day to tell the story of Schuyler Meyer, who is credited with starting Urger’s educational program back before 1990.  As of today, the season is over.  Over 4500 NYS fourth graders have experienced the “Urger program” this season.  That number and more have visited the 113-year-old vessel in festivals and other contexts  along the  Canal, now recognized as a very large location on the National Register of Historical Places.

Thanks to Chris Kenyon of Wayne County Tourism for the first and last photo here.  All other photos were taken by Will Van Dorp.

 

0aaaaex20OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA0aaaaex160aaaaex15OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Whether you carry passengers like Grande Caribe or bulk like Day Peckinpaugh, restrictions of size are the same.

Photos today by Will Van Dorp.

Bergen Point, a 1958 Blount product,  coming through the Narrows last weekend.  Click here for many interesting vessels from Blount that have appeared on this blog.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And a first timer on this blog . . . John Parrish.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Penn No. 4 all painted white . . . click here and scroll through to see her in PennMaritime gray.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Bluefin . .  still in PennMaritime gray . . . or is that primer?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Maryland . . . with reflections.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

If my search window serves me right, then this is the first appearance of Katie G. McAllister on this blog.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This is definitely the first appearance of Pelican State here.  The photo of this Great Lakes Dredge & Dock boat is here thanks to Mike and Michele Mcmorrow.

0aaart5

And thanks to Mage, here’s Esti and

0aaaart6

Cerro Jefe.

0aaaart7

A previous view here  of Emily Ann had her as Solomon Sea.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Brian Nicholas at work in Great Kills.  Click here (scroll through) to see her as both Banda Sea and Brian Nicholas.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And finally . . . it’s the mystery tug Elbe when it was Maryland Pilot boat Maryland.  At its stern is its predecessor, Baltimore.  I haven’t found out much about Baltimore.  Any help?  About Maryland, Capt. Brian Hope–who shared this photo, said this, “In 1985 and MARYLAND was donated to Greenpeace.  She was a great boat, but too expensive to operate. She had a crew of 18, plus a chief steward.  The crew worked two weeks on and two weeks off, so that, counting the steward, we had a total of 37 crew.   When we went ashore that was reduced to about 21 and our fuel, repair and food costs dropped dramatically as well.   I am very glad to see that she has been preserved (in Maassluis).  She’s a great boat!”  Thanks to a generous reader, here’s an article about her sea trials.

0aaaart11

When next I post, I hope to share photos Elbe in her restored glory.

Sorry to miss NYC’s fleet week again.

Here was 17, a reminder of what this series is about:  I’m avoiding the word miscellaneous.

First, from Birk Thomas . . . a closer-up of another Blount this week.  Doesn’t it share some spirit of 1960 Ford blue?

0aaaall1

From bowsprit, who wanted to know why a scalloper was headed southbound along Manhattan the other day, the windy day?  Well, I’m resisting the chance to set up an April Fool’s post . . . it was actually in the sixth boro to escape the stormy seas and 30′ PLUS waves out where it normally works.  Endurance is no timid scallop boat . . .

0aaaall2

I’ve been eager to share this assemblage of old calendar, baseball card, and mermaid bottle openers from Greenport, a place with a distinctly New England ship-building history feel.   Are any of these anywhere still extant?  Click here for a photo of a City Island, NY yard that once built them.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Anyone know which sixth boro regular is a triple screw?  Answer follows.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here’s Bayou Dawn getting some new skin a few weeks back.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I’m putting up this post with my apartment windows open . . . spring has vanquished winter . .  so it’s time for a few photos of winter’s recent oppression.   Ever wonder how the loader gets to the bottom of the hold of a bulker?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Odigitria came here with salt a few weeks back and those holds that were then filled with gleaming white minerals might now be filled with dull black stone now.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

As summer gets cooer, I’m imagining doing some research on these boats and the larger tenders.  When I see a buoy boat, I imagine an Elco in industrial disguise.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I took these photos less than six weeks ago, and my finger are only just now thawed out.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Thanks to Birk and bowsprit for the first two photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

Let me know what you think that triple screw is.

Time to clear the decks for spring!

By the way, did anybody catch a photo of DSV Joseph Bisso coming through the KVK this morning?

That’s Hobo on the left. And what is that larger vessel?  Although I was told it was a supply vessel, a little hunting turned up another category, a botruc . . . or bo-truc.

0aaaapi1

Here, according to the owner, the yellow stripe was added to make the vessel–which has spent most of its life serving the island with the DoHS research facility and NOT the island where I used to live– appear less ominous.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I’ve done lots of posts featuring Blount boats. Click here for the list.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Check hull #94.  This is what Plum Isle looked like in 1963.  It introduces a new word . . . botruc, quite the 1960s word. Here’s another.  Click here for a photo of a vessel with similar lines, the Blount-built Sailor, a lube tanker that worked–or still works–on the Delaware.

0aaaaplumisleorig

So . .  does this new word apply to Rosemary as well?  Bopickups?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And Danalith . . . here headed for Cape Verde, is she a shi-cars?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All photos except the archival one by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s the first post I did on this vessel more than 5 years ago.

When I saw Twin Tube–a workhorse older than me– northbound yesterday, I’d no idea we’d meet up again later.   What caught my attention right then was

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

the lowering boom, something I’d not noticed before.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here she is, as Electra rages, westbound in the KVK, boom lowered and supplies-laden.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And then it was explained to me . . . rather, demonstrated . . . , lower boom to get into work position.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Note the operator of the ship’s crane upper left.   A week ago this crew basked in sun on tropical seas.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Now they need groceries, spare parts, stores . . . .

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

As a resident of and a familiar with New York’s City’s SIX boros, I feel strongly that this–and not the luxury baubles and almost ancient poets–make us a city of ships.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Let’s follow the evolution of this boat.  Two years ago she went by Coney Island.  I was looking forward to having a tugboat by that name in the sixth boro.   A check of the USCG vessel documentation site showed that previously she had gone by Mister Jordan, a vessel I’d never seen.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The builder’s plate showed that prior to using the Mister Jordan name, she was Beth I.  That sent me to the Blount site, where I also learned she was first built in 1958 for Bethlehem Steel, and that Vulcan III might be a twin.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Next I saw this vessel high and dry and in different colors. Now watch what happens with the stack.  It’s a black “muffler” here, and then when next I saw her,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

the black housing was gone and there were two pipes with smallish mufflers sprouted from the back of the house.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Enjoy a few more shots taken in the past few months of Coastline Bay Star.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

A handsome vessel working past the half century mark, launched the same year as this powerhouse and  one of these.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

. . . aka a jumble.

I took the foto below of Stephen  L. Colby (St. Louis, MO-built, 1967, 144′ x 40′) on 1/4/2013 in Cairo, IL.  Yesterday, the boat sank into 14 feet of water farther north on the Mississippi.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Below, s/v Concetta meets Charles D. McAllister (Jacksonville, FL, 1967, 94′ x 29′)  in late October.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Twin Tube (Blount, 1951, 64′ x 19′)  passes the polytube rack.  If you click on the link in the previous sentence, you’ll see the very next completed Blount project was of Ceres, a “grain elevator.”  A google search turned up no fotos.  Anyone know of any?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I took this foto a week and a half ago.  Currently, Grande Sierra Leone has left Dakar bound for Cotonou, passing the older Grande Buenos Aires en route.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Bow Hector in the Kills a few days ago . . . now in Morehead City.   Bow! Hector!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Taft Beach . . . shuttling dredge spoils, inbound.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Sludge tanker North River noses past 118,000-bbl  barge Charleston.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

On Marathon Day, this was Explorer of the Seas ( I think) approaching the Narrows, as seen past the stern of Transib Bridge.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

A few days ago . . . it’s Challenge Paradise.   I wonder if that’s ever a command. . . .

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And at the same moment, crude oil tanker Felicity.   By the way, I passed between felicity and challenge paradise . ..  steering clear.   Both vessels are currently southbound off the coast of the Carolinas.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Finally, in the Buttermilk, it’s MAST’s r/v Blue Sea, passing Wilson Newcastle and McAllister Responder.    Responder and Charles D. are two of the triplets built near the end of the run at Gibbs Gas Engine, currently a place to sleep and stroll.   The last time I saw Roderick-the third triplet– in the sixth boro was here.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

As I scrambled away from the train, Meredith C. Reinauer ruffled the glassy calm of the river at the Rondout  Light.  Here long ago the Delaware and Hudson Canal completed its 108-mile journey from coal country to what was then the fast river transport to sixth boro coal market.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And here waiting for me was my flesh-and-blood sister and brother-in-law and their Maraki, which they sailed around the world in the 1990s.  See their newly-inaugurated blog here.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This was an opportunity, to rediscover the Hudson Valley with them, after all we never see or step into the same Hudson twice.  I’ve seen Esopus Meadows light many times before, but

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

have never passed the volunteer boat.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

When last I saw this “castle,” it was a Redemptorist retreat center, but now it’s something different.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

It was gratifying to see the pilotboat John E. Flynn on station at Norrie Point.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The last time I recall seeing this house in Hyde Park I’d not sensed it would rival the other mansions there, like the Vanderbilt and the FDR (currently closed because of the shutdown! !@!@##) homes.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Maraki and Grande Caribe had last crossed paths on the Erie Canal.   More large sightseeing vessels on the Hudson soon.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Maraki had sailed under this first bridge when it was still a disused rail structure.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

!@#@!  ?  pirate canoe club?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OK . .  I had to put up another foto of Patricia.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The Hudson Valley is a spectacular place.  More soon.  A version of it . . . in print . . . check out T. C. Boyle’s World’s End.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 427 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments? Email Tugster

My job . . . Summer AND Fall 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Recent Comments

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

Archives

free web page hit counter
December 2014
M T W T F S S
« Nov    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 427 other followers