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Here’s my post from a year ago. Where HAS the time gone?  A joy of doing this blog is to go back, and sometimes as with this one, my memory–or is it my gut–recalls the eagerness of that morning 365 days ago.  What I pursued then I still pursue  . . .

Can you spot anything in the foto below that suggests the time of year?  Answer follows.  All fotos look better if you enlarge by doubleclicking on them.

Oyster Creek reenacts a moment with the Bayonne Bridge that mimics a Fractor scene (see my “masthead” atop each post) from five years back.

L. W. Caddell struts out into the KVK all in a day’s work that

shows off its bollard pull.

Mary Alice (ex-Gulf Sword, 1974) sashays back to the work on the channel near Shooters.  I wonder, given how long the deepening of  the sixth boro channels has been ongoing and how from the surface, the water looks unchanged, has anyone heard of a moniker for this project akin to “big dig,”  a Boston phenomenon?

Behemoths like NYK Romulus, relatively small given the world fleet, benefits from this dredging.  Notice the red/green detail nearly in the center of this foto.  Might that be on-deck controls for a bow thruster?

In her last moments of this leg of her never-ending journey, she’s assisted by Gramma Lee T Moran and

Margaret Moran.  Without the dredging and without assistance, Romulus would never get here and

negotiate this

S-curve.  Notice in the distance, where on Shooters shore the dredging currently focuses.  If you missed this post showing Shooters a century ago, click here.  If you want a comparison then and now, click here.

So, did you find the seasonal reference in the top foto?  Here’s another look . . . move your eye toward the bell in front of Amy Moran‘s  raised wheelhouse.  Piney branches.  I like it.  And I’m thrilled to see Ice Babe Base back in town.

Parting shot for this solstice:  from left to right, Barney Turecamo, Amy Moran, and Turecamo Boys Girls (Thanks, Harold!).

Saturday I hit the road for the south, Chattahoochee watershed, then Cape Fear, then maybe Newport News.  Tomorrow I may put up some road fotos not yet used from the last trip.

Thanks for reading.  Peace,  friendship, prosperity, and imagination to all of you.    Health too.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, today. . . . first day of winter . . . 63 degrees in the sixth boro!

There’s a link a bit later to a post from last winter.    I hope you check it.  For now I’ll say Robert Frost was on the money here.

Yes, it’s Kristin Poling, embracing her future.

Here’s what Robert Frost wrote, as a paraphrase of Dante Alighieri:         “Some say the world will end in fire,    Some say in ice.          From what I’ve tasted of desire       I hold with those who favor fire.           But if it had to perish twice,        I think I know enough of hate             To say that for destruction ice           Is also great                        And would suffice.”

Note the house, removed and on the bank.  Here’s the fotos of the ice NOT sufficing to destroy  Kristin 11 months ago.    Here are some fotos from my visit on her two months ago.

Many many thanks to Bob Silva for these fotos, which he took yesterday.    RIP,  (recycling into productivity) Kristin Poling, December 15, 1934—Dec 15, 2011.

Notice the Village Voice icon has disappeared.  Tugster didn’t get their nod.  Thanks for voting.  Although it would have been nice to win, winning is not why I blog.

You know the song;  I decided to adapt it like this.

“On the first tides of Christmas, my true loves spoke to me . . . of  propellers in a parts tree.

On the second tides of Christmas, my true loves gave to me, two honey boats, and  . . .

… three schooner sails,  . . .

… four ferry boats,  . . .

… five safety rings,  . . .

… six sailors sailing,  . . .

… seven short sea shippers,  . . .

… eight bunkers pumping,  . . .

nine scows a dumping,  . . .

… ten dredgers digging,  . . .

… eleven lighters lightering,  . . .

…twelve tugs a pushing, . . .

and pushing and pushing . . .

Happy holidays, and maybe the Village Voice will employ it in this song.  Here’s the original, if you don’t know the Twelve Days . . . song.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Same idea only different . . . check out frogma.

Well, maybe not that different, since I’m not reinventing myself.  But enjoy these fotos, and while looking at them, fugure out where you’ve seen this tug before on this blog.  Look carefully.  It took me about 30 seconds to recognize the red tug below as a more pristine version of a tug that appears here periodically.  Fotos were taken in the 1980s by Seth Tane, who generously shares them here.

In its current state, this tug, using the same name, has considerably more equipment on board.  What hasn’t changed is the profile of the Palisades in the background of some of these fotos, taken in or near Hastings-on-Hudson, NY.

This tug today still operates commercially, pulling loads like the one below.

A major change in the tug relates to visibility;  the portholes would make me claustrophobic. However, since the mystery tug was built on the Great Lakes, maybe portholes conserve heat better in winter.   Tug Daniel A. White, below left, has more conventional glass.  Anyone know what has become of Daniel A. White?

If you guessed Patty Nolan, you were correct.  Here’s her current work page, showing her original form.  Click on the following links for a sampling of Patty Nolan fotos from the past few years, like modelling 2011 summer beach fashion, at work in the East River, moving snail-like with house,  and finally . . . for now . . . Patty Nolan outlaw fashionista.

Thanks much to Seth for these fotos from the early 1980s.

Below is a foto (poor quality)  that I took in December 2000.  I clearly had forgotten how barren the Jersey City shore just north of the Morris Canal looked a mere 11 years ago, almost reminiscent of a desert town.  This foto was among a batch my sister handed me at Thanksgiving, but those foto gave me

an idea.  Maybe you have fotos in a drawer, a shoebox, and album, etc. that show some part of the sixth boro and/or vessels there.  And if I may so brazen, tugster would LOVE to see any fotos you might come across and are willing to share.

Here was Something Different 4.

Here was #1 of this series, started earlier this month, featuring quite random fotos and thoughts.  Here’s a shot looking toward Shooters and Elizabeth, NJ.  In the foreground just off the street and that bell tower and to the left of the cement silo are three . .  actually four identical brown brick structures; the fourth one is mostly obscured by the silo.  I have no clue, although they look like pylons to a structure long gone.  Help?

To give a sense of scale of vessels in the KVK, I’m fairly tall, measuring 1.8796 m by last calculation.  If I could stand on the waterline, the spritz here would come up past my knees.

Standing here, I could barely reach up past the bottompaint green into the MOL blue.

Tides were quite extreme last week, although I haven’t researched beyond that.  The indicator was

stuff like this long submerged engine showing off its transformation.

In a bit, I’m hitting the road . . . gallivant time, so many places to see along so much highway and way too little time.  The blog may vacate for a few days . . .  But on the 26th, whether I post or not, this blog has its fifth anniversary.  This is post #1608 in the past 1825 days.  Post #1 was prompted by my huge stone-bellied muse.  Thanks so much for reading;  I’ve had a blast.  I’m eager to get gone and then get back.

PS:  If you haven’t voted or asked a half dozen friends to vote for this blog as “best neighborhood blog” and “best photo blog” (#5 and 24), please do so now.  A few of you have written to say you like thinking of the sixth boro as one of the overlooked neighborhoods of NYC, the place said to be comprised of five terracentric boros.

 

Next week I might pass through the Erie Canal town of Lyons, NY, where Grouper again appears forgotten, bereft of a future.  Last spring had brought some hope, but  . . .

These fotos come from Jason LaDue, who knew her while he was growing up in the vicinity of the Soo.  Foto below by Troy Wilke.  Jason writes, “That rare (and large) Kahlenberg smoked like no other but always delivered the power.  I was onboard her several times when moving saltwater vessels to and from the Algoma Steel facility in Sault Ste Marie, Ontario.”

Next year 2012, Grouper has a one CENTURY anniversary, 100 years of life, the last decade and a half of which she seems in a coma.   Here was my original Grouper post, followed by 67 comments!

These fotos by R LaDue show what spirit this vessel had as Iroquois

in the Soo Tug Race, 1989. 

Many thanks, Jason.  I plan to use more of your fotos soon.

Uh . . . I miscalculated and got no new fotos of cutter Eagle today, but John Watson made a smart choice

and got these . . . .  Bravo,  John!  Check out this Eagle/Horst Wessel crew reunion blog.  And thanks to PortSide NewYork, this info on visiting hours this weekend aboard Eagle  at Pier 7 Brooklyn Marine Terminal . . . Today . .. .  2 — 5 pm, Saturday . . . 1–7pm, and Sunday  . . . 10 am–7 pm.
1) . . . Name the four sister training barques.    Answer follows.Still,  serendipity gave me other fotos for another day.  Instead, enjoy a few more Eagle  I took yesterday . . . sans ceremonial escort boats and with some facts about the vessel.

2.  In launch order among the five “siblings”, where does Eagle find itself?  By the way, I can’t identify the cruise ship in the distance.

3.  When did Eagle (ex-Horst Wessel) enter US hands and who crewed it to the US?  Note the anchor ball just above a member of the crew.

4.  How many aircraft has this vessel downed in its career and of what air force(s)?

5.  What year was the orange “racing stripe” added?

6.  How many of the sister vessels have NEVER visited the sixth boro?

1.   Gorch Fock (1933 ex-Tovarishch), Sagres III (1937Mircea (1938), and Gorch Fock II (1958).  Eagle is second . . . built in seven months and commissioned in September 1936.

2.  Eagle was built in 1936, placing it as second oldest.

3.  It was transferred to US ownership in May 1946 and sailed to the US in June of the same year by a joint German/American crew.  Point of entry to the US and disembarkation of the German members of the crew happened at Camp Shanks, more or less across from Yonkers.  Does anyone know of fotos of Eagle headed up or down the Hudson in 1946?

4.  It downed three Soviet planes and one German “friendly.”

5.  Racing stripe was added in 1976.

6. I don’t know which–if any–of the Blohm + Voss training barques have NEVER visited New York harbor.

The two fotos below show a plaque in what used to be Camp Shanks.  Vessel in the distance below is Wanderbird, also

 a repurposed vessel from Western Europe.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who took these fotos of Eagle five years ago.  Thanks a bundle for the fotos from this morning, John.

Finally, the other Blohm + Voss vessel in New York harbor is Peking, languishing in South Street Seaport limbo.  Peking is 377′ loa x 46 beam’ x  16′ draft; compared with Eagle‘s 295′ x 31′ x 17.’

Click here to read the reminiscences of Emil Babich, who crewed aboard Eagle in June 1946 for Eagle’s FIRST arrival in the Hudson on its way to Camp Shanks.

Angus Express got in about 24 hours later than had been predicted  . . . that’s right on time, boat time.  Many thanks to John McCluskey and John Watson for these pics.

 I believe that’s Quantico Creek standing by with bunker fuel.

The top two fotos come from John Watson, and the ones below come thanks to John McCluskey, who shot these from Bay Ridge.

 Around the same time the heifer vessel arrived, who came in . ..

 Wooley Bully!!!    Of course THAT’s as much a coincidence as my linking to this song.

Angus and Shorthorn are two of ten vessels in the Vroon fleet.  Angus is two years older and about 50′ shorter than Shorthorn.  The visit of these two vessels in the past half month raises a lot of logistical questions in the mind of this erstwhile farm kid;  some answers are provided in this series of links:  types of livestock carriers, relative size and capacity  (  e.g., 14,000 cattle!!!) , problems/challenges associated with this transport . . .  Here are many more such vessels.    Questions NOT answered for me are:  is the manure stored until reaching destination or treated/disposed of at sea?  Ditto . ..  fatalities among the animals?  And although it probably bunkered “empty” of cattle, is a loaded vessel noisy  . . as a stable with lowing and mooing?  What type of feed is given to the cows enroute?  Can cattle get seasick?  Why have we seen two cattle carriers in two weeks, whereas I’ve not noticed one before?  And facetiously, might a hull filled with several thousand lowing cattle be heard–conducted via water–by a pod of whales?

Angus arrived in the sixth boro yesterday in late afternoon, and as of this writing, it is about to enter Delaware Bay on its way to  . . . Wilmington.  So is Ocean Drover.  Can anyone get me an invitation to tour a cattle carrier  vessel there?

Related:  Check out this cattle transport.

Quite unrelated:  Samudio . . .I am GLAD you are still around!

Beat the heat . ..  by imagining change:  well, eastriver suggested the sixth boro annex the Conch Republic.  Hmmm.  Since the sixth boro is an archipelago like the Keys, maybe we could confederate the American archipelagos (besides the two already mentioned, we’d join with the Thimble Islands, the Thousand Islands, the Channel Islands, the Salish Islands, and maybe establish diplomatic relations with all archipelagos smaller than . . . Long Island, giving us many of the Antilles, a smattering of Pacific nations,  the Aeolian Islands and Greek Islands.   I know I’ve left many out, but it’s already sounding like good company in my heat-addled brain.

Or defocus on the scorching temperatures by looking at fotos below?

First one is a “tugster-sighting” just north of the sixth boro snapped by Joel Milton.  Tugster is on the foredeck of Patty Nolan  (1931) sans figurefigure as she tows sailing vessel sans-servingsails Lickity-Split some weeks back, here passing the Englewood Cliffs boat basin, I believe.

Next foto from John Watson . . . Eddie R (1971) towing a mystery barge.  Any guesses its mission?

Answer comes from Les Sonnenmark, longtime friend of the tugster blog:  it’s a cable-laying barge operated by Calwell Marine.  Info on the barge can be found in this pdf . . . starting on the unnumbered page 6ff.    In fact, this barge may be related to the work of Dolphin III in the sixth boro last summer:  click the link to “marine contractor” above the last foto in this post you find here.

Foto by tugster near the Chesapeake City Bridge as 2011-launched Mako ensures Penn No. 81 makes

its way Chesapeake-bound.  More info on the pilotboat in the background soon.

Foto by Jed of Vickie M McAllister (2001) docked at McAllister’s Blount Island yard on the St John’s River .

Foto by G. Justin Zizes Jr. of Kathleen Turecamo (1968)  and

and Matthew Tibbetts (1969) both high and dry at Caddell Shipyard in Staten Island.

Foto from Lou Rosenberg of Aegean Sea (1962) near Rockaway Inlet.  Aegean Sea used to

be called, in order,  Francis E. Roehrig, Jersey Coast, and John C. Barker.

This yard tug in Mayport seems to have a protection  bar, but in spite of the

the numbers on the stern, I’ve found no info on this type.  Fotos by tugster.  Orange bow on the right side of foto belongs to C-Tractor 13.

A final shot of Patty Nolan and Lickety Split headed upriver.

Thanks to Joel, John, Les, Jed, Justin, and Lou.

Only tangentially related:  For info on YTB-832, previously based in Mayport and now possibly in Greece by way of Italy, click here.

And an even less tenuous tangential connection to these fotos of vessels of  La Guardia di Finanza, which sounds like what our government is supposed to do but actually refers to something quite different . . . .  What it is can be found here.

More fotos will be forthcoming from the Conch Republic, a possible future residence.

When January has ended and winter still holds us in its icy grip, some folks around the sixth boro get together and engage in group therapy to exorcise the  demons of  cold and isolation.  Here and here are previous sessions.

Here’s a group shot of those seeking solace from the debilitation of February fevers and agues last evening at the Ear Inn about 8 pm.

Frogma, who issued the convocation to gather, launches into the treatment:  evoke summer future  and

conjure up villains of summers past, no

matter how toothy.

There’s always next summer, when spirits will be again youthful and carefree,

always.

Here’s Adam’s account of last night.  Besides Frogma and TQ, also representing different takes on the sixth boro last night were Carolina of PortSide NewYork, Peconic Puffin, Rick Old Salt, John and Vicky (who drew the mermaid above) of Summit to Shore, Bowsprite (who shaded in the shark and breathed life into it) , and yours truly (whose fingers extruded the outline of the shark, as if from tribal memory of terror).

And this just in:  Puffin Michael’s version of the events.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp .  . who was particularly geography-challenged last night.

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My job . . . Summer AND Fall 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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