You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘birds’ category.

Most of the previous birds posts have been in winter .  . except this one.  I find birds one of the joys of winter.  So on the last day of winter, rather than go out and get rainy/sleet fotos, enjoy these.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Two Brants discuss the approaching Hayward and the distancing Prominent Ace escorted in by Ron G.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Mergansers are always a joy.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here a flock of them discuss the passing B. Franklin Reinauer.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Buffleheads are indicator species for me that winter is upon us.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Mallard female?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

It’s time for winter to retreat . . . .

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Yesterday a goal was to get a better look at this vessel, Ternen.

Her odd posture resulted from some marine variation on a flat tire.

And while I watched, this familiar bulbous bow appeared, headed for sea.  Alice!!  she was in town almost to the day six years after I started this blog.

Almost exactly four years ago I posted this, with a tallying of statistics about two years of watching/studying the empiricals of New York harbor aka the sixth boro.

Thanks to your continued encouragement in the form of reading, commenting, correcting  . . .  I’m still watching life on the most important boro of this port city.

The buffleheads are back, and when I asked, they let on they were really happy they were not gallopavos of any sort.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

By the way, no matter any info to the contrary, tomorrow is Blue Friday.    Why blue?  DonJon blue . . . of course.  Atlantic Salvor will be arriving back in the boro towing sections of the WTC antenna.  You can track it here.

How I spent Thanksgiving 22 years ago . ..  in Basra, Iraq . . . click here.

Two weeks ago, Sandy raged, leaving a deadly and disastrous trail through the sixth boro and surrounding land masses.  Athena has also blanketed us, through many green leaves somehow remain on trees.  Companies are attempting to return to routine.  Ever notice how much the KVK channel zigzags, as seen here with APL Spinel tailing Meagan Ann and her scow.  The strait’s not at all straight.

Clearly what’s blasted from and scooped out of the AK is virgin rock.

Sandy scoured away much of the volunteer vegetation along the KVK.  A foto taken here a month ago would show lots of weeds and a quite living tree.

The absence of cover makes it easier for this hawk to spot the “shore squirrels.”

Storms eroding a beach sometimes uncover shipwreck (here and here) , treasure, skeletons . . . all manner of stuff. See the last foto here, taken about 20 years ago.  The surge along one section of the KVK unearthed dozens of these bricks.  Is Belgian Syndicate a local firm?

A fair number of government boats are still around, like this one . . . taking advantage of unseasonal warmth . . . and

Clean Waters, a Region 2 EPA vessel I’d heard about but never seen until yesterday.  Given Region 2’s size, I wonder how many other vessels–I saw Kenneth Biglane once once and that was already three years ago–they have and where they’re usually homeported.

Wright and Kennedy (only the stacks are visible forward of Wright’s house) are still in town.  Understandably, some folks I’ve talked to still live in conditions far from normal.

I’m guessing this train–unusual as it is– has to do with the completion of a job, not Sandy:  Sea Bear tows a train of eight or nine vessels, including  Iron Wolf.

Yet, recreational sail has returned. Sun Dragon is the nearer.

Line handlers aboard CSAV Rio Aysen . . .  (check their recent stops at that link) take in all this harbor activity.   Vessel is named for a river in southern Chile.

All fotos yesterday by Will Van Dorp, for whom the sixth boro is among other things an ever-changing puzzle.

Guess what this is?  I’ll call it T-time on Kraken.

Then this is T minus five minutes.  Note the orange mass just forward of the channel marker.

T minus five seconds!

Believe it or not . . . this is T PLUS five seconds.  So, there was a thud that resonated through the concrete barrier I braced myself behind on shore at least 600 feet away, and then the sound of spray seen in the first foto above.  But five seconds beyond . . . mist had dissipated and some gurgles formed in the water.

T plus fifteen seconds . . . the first bird arrives and the water turns muddy.

T plus a half minute, the gurgles have grown, appear grainy and muddy, and a yellowish mist forms.

One minute beyond . .  birds have heard the dinner bell . . . er . . . blast.

I wonder what the cormorant on lower right of center is thinking . . ..

Two minutes beyond . . .

And the zone reopens to traffic.  All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who has a blast every time he goes down to the water.  The last blast depicted on this blog–taken in Panama–was the final foto in this post from back in March.

Late last week I alluded to an imminent gallivant.  I imagined it’d be like this (truck’s not mine and I didn’t steal it), being transported away from all

thought of the sixth boro as I explored the bountiful  interior on the first day of fall.

So down this valley about 300 miles upstate we traveled to see what would be around the next bend, and

the next.

Look at the terrain on this foto, left side.  Notice anything?  I’ll come back to it.

Who would imagine this is New York state?

And then the birds caught my attention:

buzzards and

and hawks of some sort.

Bird play was interrupted by the rumble of a train, and I’d imagined the bridge in the foto above was derelict!  It was long.

Here’s the cropped version of the foto above I asked you to look at.  Notice the horizontal break in the trees?  I didn’t get to that side, but once there was a

canal there, the Genesee River Canal.  Click here to see the same ridge from more or less the same vantage point about 150 years ago.  And the tugs looked like this.

And that bridge . .  here’s what it took to build its predecessor.

The beauty of the Genesee River convinced me to follow it up toward Lake Ontario.  Here’s High Falls in Rochester . . . and another train crossing it, this one with containers ultimately bound for  . . . China via the sixth boro, which

these reminders won’t let me escape, and that’s not a bad thing.

And this business has operated here since Prohibition.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who’s pictured in the gratuitous foto of the 1959 Chevy Apache pickup.

“Moran” means one thing in many Eastern and Southern US ports.  It refers to something/someone else out here.  There was Michael in the mid-19th century, and around the same time, there

were–likely unrelated to Michael– Thomas and Edward.  Thomas painted the western wonders, although he had New York roots.  His brother Edward painted the sixth boro.

“Steamboat” has another meaning here too.  In this unearthly landscape, the

sounds and smells

outstrip the sounds, smells, and power at a gathering like the  “pageant of steam.”  Below is “steamboat geyser,” currently in neutral.

Meanwhile . . . the road beckons . . . but with

occasional stops.   I’ve no idea who this bird is or what he was telling me.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

What happens in the time it takes to read the morning paper?  Well . . .

0635 . . . Maersk Montana passes the salt pile,

0639 . . . Catherine Turecamo sets up to nudge Nord Sea outbound,

0642 . . . Greenland Sea passes Con Hook while a cruise ship prepares to dock in Bayonne,

0644 . . . Catherine follows Nord Sea til the pilot debarks,

0649 . . . Viking approaches with DBL 102,

0659 . . . Davis Sea passes with DBL 32,

0701 . . . Magothy heads  . . . for the yard maybe,

0722 HS Livingstone (currently in Norfolk) passes an avian escort as it heads for sea with

a respectable GRADALL with an articulated-neck jackhammer that caused much

consternation among these geese.

0704 . . .  an hour and nine minutes have passed.  Siberian Sea and Davis Sea meet, and for me time for another cup of tea.

All fotos taken Sunday morning by Will Van Dorp.   More Sunday fotos to follow.

Here was the first “play boats.”

What’s this?

For some to entice us to play, it takes a 1935 85′ Mathis Trumpy named

—what else–

Enticer.  Exactly a year ago, I posted about a 1926 Trumpy Mathis named Freedom.

For others it takes teeth and arms . . . even if faux.   If you live along the Erie Canal, keep a watch since PT 728 will soon be moving over to Lake Erie.

And still others of us need to fish, as from a C-Dory like this.

Then there are Feadships like Utopia II.

Or there’s the plaything of Roman Abramovitch, the

vessel with the luxury tender, Luna!

What’s this red unit, plaything of tides, currents, and winds?  More later.

And very near many of these playboats, a banded bird that plays with prey. To see more eagles along the Hudson and other birds, click here.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

I needed smiles so bad that I went through the past few months of fotos looking for cheeriness.  And as I put these up, the sun broke through what feels like two weeks of mostly clouds.  A sea lion, and

a close up of a sea lion,

a deck seal,

lots of fish, and my pole-vaulting

amazon.

Yeah, and this goes out to Paul . . . I don’t know how you manage all those weeks on the job!  Tomorrow I have got to get some R & R.

Meanwhile the clouds are back and Willie is in my ear.

Le vie navigabili  . . . is what you could call “sesto borgo” or “the sixth boro.”  And it’s navigated by creatures small as these canadagoslings,

greater,

numerous . . . unwanted or

scruffy but perennially utilitarian.

Say hello to 3/4 of the painting crew on Pegasus last Saturday.  Vote daily for Pegasus here–so that she might benefit from a huge grant of $250,000–and

starting from THIS weekend, come and visit Pegasus on board at Pier 25 in the boro called Manhattan.    The schedule now calls for Pegasus to leave this “canale” within the sixth boro tomorrow . . . Thursday, pick up Lehigh Valley 79, and move back over to Pier 25.    In reference to the canales di venezia, Pegasus would look good exploring there . . .  By the way, here’s a log of Pegasus’ last visit to the drydock for work.

Here you’re looking east  at Manhattan and its tallest building from the Morris Canal in New Jersey.  Il canale di morris è una delle vie navigabili del sesto boro.

See you some hours this weekend on Pegasus at Pier 25.   And please . . . vote daily, no mater which continent you are on.

Parting shot . .  a foto of Pegasus leaving the tour dock in Yonkers 11 months ago.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

By the way, the tugboat shown most completely in the 4th foto is the 1943 46.5′ Linda G.   I don’t know where she was built.  Pegasus is 96′ and 1907-built in Baltimore.  The goslings, hatch of 2012, were about 4″ long.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 400 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments? Email Tugster

My job . . . Summer AND Fall 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

Archives

free web page hit counter
October 2014
M T W T F S S
« Sep    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 400 other followers