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The sixth boro has pyramids?

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It does have fortifications, here patrolled by Gelberman.

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And lots of interesting names, making for great juxtapositions.

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And every now and then some seldom seen boats pass like this one, always out there but rarely –it seems–coming in close.

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Kendall J. Hebert for a closeup!

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I regret I didn’t get a close-up of the stack.

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Ron G rotates through the sixth boro now and then.

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So . . . back to those pyramids, there’re over by South Amboy, at Amboy Aggregates.  Sand Master is involved, of course.

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Thanks to Ashley Hutto for the pyramids and Sand Master photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

UPDATE:  If you want to see in real time developments from the waterfront in Giglio, click here and here for two webcams Giglio Porto Panoramica, each from a different perspective.   Thanks to David Hindin for these links.  David sent these fotos along last year from San Francisco.

Less than a half hour after waking up this morning, drinking coffee, reading the paper and wanting to find out who “James H. Thompson” and “Pridi Banomyong”  were, I encountered this page.  Countless times today I met it again.  I support wikipedia’s opposition to SOPA and PIPA and urge you to tell your congressfolk too.   Or at least find out about the issue.

But of course, I’m not darkening this blog.  Especially when I can share such colorful fotos of Sand Master yesterday before the rain.

Sand Master looks a lot like Greenland Sea and Na’Hoku, but  . . .  surprise, each comes from a different shipyard although all at one time belong to Otto Candies.

Sand Master was built by Swift Ships in Pass Christian, MS in 1983.

Amboy Aggregates uses Sand Master in their sand mining activties, and as such, she spends most of its time off Sandy Hook, a presence on AIS but not so commonly seen.

John P. Brown is always a delight to see, as

is Thomas J. and yesterday

was no exception.  It was worth my while to get my feet wet taking this foto.

As I said yeasterday, I got the sense that the flag raising on Mount Hope was a signal for all manner of activity to commence.   Capt. Fred Bouchard moved into the notch of B. No. 275 and  Barbara McAllister (ex-Bouchard Boys) (see the upper wheelhouse on the far side) added her 4000 hp to

Capt. Fred‘s 5750 . . . and the waters started to churn.

Meanwhile, what or who can make the slack waters of the KVK rise up like this?

Barbara E. . . . with her 6140 hp.

Some minutes later, Barbara E. and Capt. Fred Bouchard round the bend to exit the KVK.   Interesting guy, the original Cap. Fred.

All fotos yesterday by Will Van Dorp during less than a one-hour party.

Please do something about SOPA and PIPA.

Unrelated:  Click here for the “hugest” set of links to cruise vessels that I’ve ever soon.  I’m lamenting the loss of life, but I’m not speculating about what transpired off Giglio.  But for an eerie foto of the Costa Concordia appearing to  “float in clouds,”  click here.  Here’s a portentious video from the vessel’s launch.

Between 0800 and 0900 this morning, sunshine poured down onto the KVK, and deepened all the colors.  Sand Master (more of these fotos tomorrow) was positively radiant while waiting–it seemed– for something to happen before it can get into the fuel dock.

Then I saw the “something” as Mount Hope began to inch stern first into the stream.   Laura K. Moran surged from port

to starboard to assist in the rotation, her power and precision captivating me.  But then, way atop the superstructure, movement

caught my attention, a bit of ceremony I’ve never noticed before.  A crewman made the flag fast to the halyard and

ran it up, as if to say . . .  we

are now open for business.  Here  is some of the traffic:  Mount Hope outbound passes APL Japan inbound.

OOCL Nagoya seemed to try to get up on plane, and

in doing so . . .  tailed by Barbara McAllister, deftly carved an arc between the bank and an incoming Affinity on the hip of  Marion Moran.

I then went to my appointment on the land side of Richmond Terrace, noticing from indoors two Ital container vessels (Moderna and another) passed.   Before noon, as I headed back home, I noticed that Oyster Creek with the bunker barge was refueling  Shorthorn Express  north of the VZ Bridge as

(this foto thanks to John Watson) Queen Elizabeth headed into port.  Draw what conclusion you will from the juxtaposition of these last two vessels.

Thanks to John for the foto.  All others by Will Van Dorp, who imagines that without that flag-raising, none of this traffic would have happened.

By noon, bright sunshine had turned to overcast gray and then drizzle.  No snow, though.

Working Harbor Committee (WHC) yesterday offered their first-ever trip around Staten Island;  tickets sold out fast.  Next circum with them:  next year.  Next trip with them:  August 18 and then the tug race.  I’ll post about the trip along the so-called “NJ inner coast” for the next few days.

A highlight for me was seeing the inimitable Nicole Leigh, one of Reinauer’s 7200 hp behemoths, also known to some as camera platform for some fantastic video of his rig moving with total control at a virtual 200+ knots. Here’s nytugmaster’s entire YouTube oeuvre to date.

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Coming through Port Reading Reach, I saw Sandmaster–first time ever–out of the notch.   Sandmaster in notch was here the last foto here.

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Southbound on Outerbridge Reach, we met Anacostia, another first for me.

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Anacostia, four months since launch, is Vane’s most recent Patapsco-class tug.  More of that class soon.

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Just south of Outerbridge Crossing, we passed Pati T Moran.  Outerbridge is named for Eugenius Outerbridge;  the fact that it’s geographically descriptive is entirely coincidental.

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After a quick dash across Raritan Bay, we cut inside Swinburne Island as Duncan Island approached the Narrows.

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Once in upper Bay, we encountered Charles McAllister and Ellen McAllister assisting CSAV Moema bound for sea.  More CSAV history here as well as a gallery of Panama Canal tugs here.

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More inner coast soon.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  Many thanks to Working Harbor Committee for their efforts.

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My job . . . Summer AND Fall 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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