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Looking at this set of fotos, words beginning with “w” came to mind.  Like wind-swept, an apt way to describe this land’s end called Halibut Point in Rockport, here looking toward Maine.  That’s “halibut” as in “haul about,” because as you sail round the point, you’ll encounter different winds.  The rockpile is quarried chunks never loaded onto to ships, never built into construction sites.

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Wind again comes to mind in this assemblage of traditional and new-fangled means of harnessing it.  One is up, and two will follow. Schooners are Highlander Sea and Adventure.

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Wavemaster is NOT the familiar name for the 47′ MLB like these, but it should be.

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Wake . . . follows codzilla

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OK . .  this one’s a stretch, but whenever I see a small RIB like this of the Massachusetts Environmental Police, I think sirens . . . not whistles, but then

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there’s a Rupert, a 50′ RIB, and if the previous was whistles, then this is whistles and bells.   If anyone’s thinking to give tugster a gift for Christmas, this is tops on my wishlist.

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Viking Starliner wandered through the sixth boro the other day, possibly in for some work, but then it headed south . . . Florida-bound?

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And finally this, a winter-cold sunrise, taken a week ago with  a hint that December is not far off, a year winds down, waning hours of light.

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And just apropos of absolutely nothing, had we had a few more hurricanes, we’d have gotten to hurricane William this year.

Here was 15.

Cargoes of all sorts move through the harbor.  One that has always surprised me is this ore from the Congo in the first half of the 20th century.

Here’s a vessel–certainly empty as it was towed to drydock in the old Brooklyn Navy Yard earlier this week.  I missed it but John Watson caught it.  Any ideas?  I believe I saw it in Wilmington back in mid-October.

It’s Falconia of the Corral Line, adapted to carry things that go “moo” in the night.  Stephanie Dann and Ruby M act like drovers to get Falconia into its own private East River corral.  Having grown up on an upstate NY dairy farm, I’d love to see a Corral Line vessel loaded and at sea;  even better, anchored on a calm night in a comfortable harbor.

Here’s an additional shot of the cargo barged in last week from Canada, powered by the inimitable Atlantic Salvor.  The cargo, if you missed last week’s post, is antenna sections for the World Trade Center.

Look closely at that patch of blue on Stolt Emerald‘s port side.

Although not cargo, it is truly unique application of paint . . . surfing penguins.

And finally, look at the frontmost cargo on Zim Virginia.

Here’s sideview of two Ford tow trucks, ones to be operated by wrecker drivers rather than towing officers.  And that’s Barbara McAllister running alongside.

Many thanks to John Watson for the Falconia fotos.

Three years ago when I visited Cape Ann, I returned obsessed with ideas about edifices and erections . . .  no no not what you think.  For a spell I toyed with efforts to grow ideas of erecting lights in the sixth boro like this . . . until I concluded–at the time–that our fair harbor already has its light. . . yet I’m ambivalent about the finality of that answer.

I like Gloucester’s unique reinvention of the tradition of a tree with lights, a genuine community effort, building the tree while building a community.

Evidence of community building showed elsewhere too  . .  like here.

The inscription barely visible in the foreground says “Step into my shoes and feel inspired,” and I did and was.  Fitz Hugh (or Henry) Lane‘s work is truly a memorial framing past.

Gloucester’s Harbor Walk has to be one of the most amazing ways to marry state-of-the-art technology with a  means to memorialize the past.  Here’s an article on its genesis and funding, and the  home website for these 42 “stations of the port.”

A stone’s throw from the water . . . a shrine to Gordon W. Thomas,  author of one of my all-time favorite books.

Here’s another memorial at the Portuguese church.

This marker in Bearskin Neck (Rockport) features some great obsolete words, seafencibles and “townsmen … in stockings.”

Actually, I was there in part to build a personal memorial, although I hadn’t known that when I first arrived.  Standing in Fitz’s shoes was inspirational.

And so  . ..  south of Straitsmouth Light, here memorialized in a postcard . . .  until some gust might topple it, a cairn stands.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Three years ago I did posts about wooden vessels and names while in the greater Cape Ann area.  This time what struck me was the variety of vessels in this small but intensely important peninsula.  Essex Shipbuilding Museum is always “must stop there” . . . and make a donation if you wish.  Essex has fewer than 4000 people.   Treat yourself to beautiful lines fleshed out in old  . . .

and new like these.

Speak of random tugs, it’s YTL-438, built on City Island, NY,  in 1944, Nicholas T today.

I can’t hear the word “Gloucester” without thinking of fish and lobsters and other sea life.  Read what Capt Joey has to say about Western Venture, here with Osprey. Joey’s GMG does “citizen journalism” par excellence on many aspect of Gloucester life, and a more historically focused website on Gloucester industry can be found here.

Vessels old and

new–like these three midwater trawlers of Western Sea Fishing– line the piers when they’re not at sea.   It no secret that fishing brings risks:  a vessel I featured here three years ago–Plan B-- sank earlier this year.

Small and newish like Cat Eyes or

or classic, versatile, and large like 1924 Highlander Sea (for sale)  and 1926 Adventure both Essex built . . .  they all lie in the few dozen acres of water in Gloucester’s Inner Harbor.   See Adventure‘ s site here and some fun fotos here.

Treats appear at every glance, near and far.

Can anyone tell me more about Traveler . .  and all her lives?  Here’s what I learned from Good Morning Gloucester:  follow the comments and you’ll learn that she was launched in “1942 by Cambridge Ship Builder, Inc. based in MD, for the US Army. She is 79.9 ft. long, was a rescue boat serving in WWII picking up downed fighter pilots and had full infirmary facilities aboard.”

More Gloucester tomorrow.  All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who realizes he should come back here more often.   And if you’ve never been to Cape Ann, sooner is better.

I lived near Cape Ann for most of the last 15 years of the 20th century,  and have to get back now and then.

Few places in the US are as connected to the water as Cape Ann, whether it be churches in Gloucester,

 small business icons in Rockport,

or National Endowments for the Arts winners for the oldest profession (really) in Essex.

I was in Gloucester too short this time to meet up with recent friends there, but old friends welcomed me back, like Mount Agamenticus here looming behind the Isles of Shoals and the Boon Island Light, visible but not pictured . . .

as did Thatcher Island.

All fotos this weekend by Will Van Dorp.

The forward portion of a new cruise ship?  Yes, I smudged the identifying marks a slash here and there.

Nah . . . almost 39 years ago she was launched as New Zealand Bear, one of two C-7 S-88s launched in Baltimore for the Pacific Far East Line.

Today Horizon Producer is one of a few dozen Jones Act containerships.  Here’s a foto of her leaving a drydocking at Brooklyn Navy Yard, a fact I heard about but never saw close up.

Compare bows here and

sterns.  Here‘s a recent itinerary for Kobe Express. More comparison:  Horizon Producer is 721′ loa x 95′, 25644 dwt.  Kobe Express is panamax . . . i.e., 964′ loa x 104′, 66,700 dwt.  See the 11th foto here for a panamax vessel shoehorned into a lock in Panama.   Tugs are Kimberley Turecamo and Laura K. Moran.

If you fancy beam-on profiles, click here.

As an aside, yesterday morning Producer passed this sad derelict launched from the same shipyard 82 years before our vintage containership, Philip T. Feeney . . .

All fotos within the past three days by Will Van Dorp, who’s mulling over a gallivant tomorrow.

Speaking of the Jones Act, here’s a recent NYTimes article about American shipping companies like Liberty Maritime not getting a fair share of US shipping. I’m embarrassed to say I’ve never heard of this company.

And shipping containers adding up to condos, check this out.  It’s threesquared.

See that empty space way up there?

It’s about to change.    Ten million dollars worth of structure is about to rise.  Nine of the 18 pieces have arrived in the sixth boro aka the harbor of NYC.

Just before noon today,

the cargo turned into the Kill Van Kull, squired in

by DonJon Marine’s

Atlantic Salvor, passing directly in front of the building the antenna soon will adorn.

As I said, watch that open space and when the antenna is planted there,

remember Atlantic Salvor and Witte barge 1407.

All fotos this morning by Will Van Dorp, who wonders how these segments will be transported to lower Manhattan.

Yesterday a goal was to get a better look at this vessel, Ternen.

Her odd posture resulted from some marine variation on a flat tire.

And while I watched, this familiar bulbous bow appeared, headed for sea.  Alice!!  she was in town almost to the day six years after I started this blog.

Almost exactly four years ago I posted this, with a tallying of statistics about two years of watching/studying the empiricals of New York harbor aka the sixth boro.

Thanks to your continued encouragement in the form of reading, commenting, correcting  . . .  I’m still watching life on the most important boro of this port city.

The buffleheads are back, and when I asked, they let on they were really happy they were not gallopavos of any sort.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

By the way, no matter any info to the contrary, tomorrow is Blue Friday.    Why blue?  DonJon blue . . . of course.  Atlantic Salvor will be arriving back in the boro towing sections of the WTC antenna.  You can track it here.

How I spent Thanksgiving 22 years ago . ..  in Basra, Iraq . . . click here.

Here are segments 1–5.

New York City is one of those places where tens of thousands of restaurants serve food from every imaginable region on earth.  Scroll through the NYTimes restaurant list for a small sampling.   Ditto music venues with sounds of the world.

The vessel below caries a mundane product that also travels from an obscure region.  Guess?

It’s not oil, like the product Scotty Sky delivers.  Oil itself is quite exotic in that it arrives from geological eras in our planet’s unimaginable past.

er . . . make that Patrick Sky.  Sorry.

And Patrick Sky delivered nothng to our mystery vessel, named for a Norse god, Balder.   Either that, or the name derives from a landscape that more denuded now that before . . .  balder?  Actually the cargo comes from a place that nearly a century and a half ago saw a mineral-motivated War of the Pacific.    And the product is  . . .

salt.  New yorkers can pride themselves that their roads, come ice and snow, sport Peruvian salt.

Balder picked up this load in Ilo, Peru.   See her recent itinerary here.

So in a few weeks–maybe–when this salt ends up on streets and sidewalks, pick some unmelted granules up and smell it.

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You may catch hints of kiwicha and quinoa, and hearing strains of charanga, you might find your feet moving to the beat of a diablada.

And I know it’s all driven by economics, but of course, New York state has its own salt mines.  For Balder in drydock, click here.  For specs on its “self-unloading/reclaimer system,” click here.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

John B.   three weeks after coming ashore.  Tethered . . . like an rogue beast.

Tagged . . . like a common railroad boxcar.

Examined by a scissor lift.

Quarantined and sequestered by yellow boom in her element and

orange pole and police tape ashore . . .

Her cavities and ducts probed, cathetered, and pumped out . . .

Prospects do indeed look grim for John B.  . . .  

her fate watched from the deep side.

All fotos today by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated:  Since Ft Wadsworth’s still closed to the public, I’ve no news about the ‘scapegoats there. Anyone have word?

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My job . . . Summer AND Fall 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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