First foto comes thanks to William Hyman, who took it eight days ago.  Resolute waits along the dock in MOTBY for its next assist.  In the background is a lesser-known 9/11 monument, a Tsereteli statue given to the US as an official gift of the Russian government only six years ago. Putin himself came here for the dedication.   Resolute is six times older than the monument, and when it was launched, no doubt no one would have imagined a Russian-donated statue would stand anywhere in NYC.

Ireland dates from 1940;  she first appeared on this blog only five months ago here.

No vessel makes more noise as it passes as OSG Vision.  And if you don’t know her power in “equines,” check here.  I guess that partially explains the throbbing, only partly since President Polk is rated at 57,000! 

Amy Moran (1973, 3000 hp) assists OSG Vision and OSG 350 through the Kills.

Amy C McAllister (1975) follows McAllister Sisters (1977) to the next assist.

Bruce A. McAllister (1974) here assists Baltic Sea I (2003) rotate and then head outbound.

A few seconds earlier, McAllister Sisters used noticeable force to push Baltic‘s stern around.

There was once a Baltic Sea that belonged to the same fleet as Beaufort Sea (1971), but that other Baltic now works out of Lagos, Nigeria.  I’ve written the new owners to ask for fotos, but  . . . so far, in vain.

Bering Sea (1975) and Jane A. Bouchard (2003) spend some time at the fuel dock.

No tug appears on this foto, but some of you just know which tug is mated to RTC 135.  Cruise ship, I believe, is Explorer of the Seas.   Answer about the tug follows.

Gelberman (1980)  may look like a tug, but USACE call it a “debris collecting vessel.”  More info on her can be found in this post from three and a half years ago.

Thanks to William Hyman for that first foto;  all others by Will Van Dorp.   And the tug mated to RTC 135 is Nicole Leigh Reinauer.

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