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I used this title over four years ago here, although in that case, I wrote about a South African vessel in the sixth boro.

I offer this post partly as a study of how ship preservation is happening in another port city on the Atlantic, almost 8000 miles away.  South African Railway and Harbours (SAR & H) had Alwyn Vintcent built in Italy in the late 1950s as part of an order of five.  Find a brief  history here, but basically, she retired in 1983;  from 1991 until 2001 she operated as a steam excursion tug in Cape Town.   Her future then became uncertain.   A farmers group (most of the site is in Afrikaans ) (this one is in English) purchased her in 2010 or 2011 and is now preparing to move her 60+ miles inland for restoration and eventual use on a freshwater reservoir.

To make the trek inland, the superstructure must be cut down to a maximum of 14′ .  Stack goes first.  See more fotos and English text of this prep-to-trek here.

Vessel also needs to be lightened.

Although the road trip is schedule for May 2012, all’s not well until it’s well.  In the mid-1980s, another group attempt to preserve Alwyn’s sister ship J. E. Eaglesham by moving her inland.

The trip was sucessful, but later she was scrapped.   More fotos of that trek are here.

Part of what sent me on this virtual South African foray was learning yesterday from a reader there named Colin that bark Europa was currently in Cape Town preparing to voyage up to St Malo, and berths were still available.   The St. Malo voyage will make stops in Ascension and Azores.   More info on 1911 bark Europa here.

For other historical South African vessels, click here.  A mix of current and historical can be found here.

May is National Preservation Month.

All fotos used with permission.

It’s been over a year since I’ve used this title . . .  I worry sometimes that someone I catch in the act of working might feel intruded upon. Such is the farthest thing from my intention.  I’m certainly not the first or last to state there’s dignity in labor, whether it’s performed indoors or out.

Here Doubleskin 37 approaches NYK Rumina (named for the goddess of breast-feeding mothers!!!) as

day breaks to refill

the bunker tanks;  Coral Coast (1970, McDermott, and attractive) in pushgear.

Green Bay shuttles between dredge and

shore, throaty as she pushes water.

Paul Andrew seems headed for a shore base as well,

as Sarah Ann heads for Newark Bay

with a deck barge.

Scott Turecamo pushes New Hampshire into the interior of Arthur Kill land.

And Maria J moves a crane barge in

the same direction.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who’s mindful that for every member of the crew outside, there are possibly four inside.

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My job . . . Summer AND Fall 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

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My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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