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Yesterday’s post featured a dredge that vacuums diamonds off the seabed.  I’d thought this remained mostly still the stuff of Jules Verne, but here’s a fairly recent assessment from the Economist, a half-decade-old article from Der Spiegel, and a southern African treasure trove of several sorts.  Dredging in the sixth boro allows trade worth billions to proceed in orderly fashion and without  . . . groundings.  Here MSC Emma heads southbound out of Newark Bay and toward the Bayonne Bridge, KVK, and …  the Atlantic.  Notice the tallest building in NYC (as of today) about seven miles away in distant Manhattan across the peninsula of Bayonne.

For outatowners, check out the lower left of the AIS screen capture below; doubleclick enlarges.  See Elizabethport?  Move toward the right along the bottom . . . see Kraken?  The foto above was taken roughly where Maurania III appears.   Now move across Bayonne toward the upper right and you’ll see lower Manhattan, where 1WTC is located.  The sinuous body of water along the lower center of the image is the KVK, the west end of which is crossed by the Bayonne Bridge, which you’ve seen at the top of this blog since post #1.

Below is the backhoe dredge Capt. A. J. Fournier, represented by the lowermost left magenta diamond.  Elizabethport’s St. Patrick’s Church is in the background between Capt AJ’s spuds, which appear of different heights because one is implanted in a deeper portion of the channel than its mate.

Notice the red clay,

overflowing buckets of it, 105% full

buckets of it.  On the south side of the gantry cranes at Port Elizabeth near the Horizon Lines vessel, another

dredge is working.  Foto taken from F. J. Belesimo showing self-dumping scow looking west and

east, again toward Manhattan.

Finally, here crew inspects the swivel motors inside the cabin of F. J. Belesimo.  Notice the diameter of drums that control the clamshell bucket.

Again, many thanks to Frank Belesimo for this tour of Cashman’s  Newark Bay/Arthur Kill project.    Any errors are my own.

And all this dredging relates to all the digging down in Panama.

Unrelated:  Note the new button . . . upper left.  Tug Pegasus (1907) and Waterfront Museum Barge aka Lehigh Valley 79 (1914)  have teamed up in a grant application for $$ for preservation work each vessel needs.  As a component of the decision-making about who gets the $$, Partners in Preservation have a “socialmedia-meter” running from now until May 21.  To help Pegasus and Lehigh Valley 79 register high on this “meter,” you can do two things from wherever on the planet you may be:  1)  befriend them on Facebook and get dozens of your friends to befriend them as well, and 2)   vote DAILY here.    DAILY!  Seems like a crazy way to run an election, but  . . . that’s social media and in this case, the cause is worthy.

Here’s the Facebook link.   For some background on Pegasus and its captain Pam Hepburn, watch this great video from almost 20 years ago.    And you must watch this. . .  a video made last week in which Pam and David explain their project . . . most compelling.

I’m elated when folks tell me they’ve enjoyed visiting tugster over the years.  Well, I’m as thrilled when you send in fotos other places beyond the sixth boro, all accessible ultimately from the the sixth boro.  In fact, the whole world awaits once you’ve gone out the Narrows or through Hall Gate.

’twas a great pleasure to get these fotos from Maureen yesterday, taken yesterday.  I’ll identify the port a bit farther.  Any guesses?  A clue might be the name of the tug:  Emilio Panfido (1969),  and

Carlo (1980).  As to the four dozen classic racers . . . you’ll have to help me identify those.

The port is Venezia aka Venice.  And I’ll need help identifying the tow of the tug as well.  And if you click on not a single link in this post, then at least spend six minutes on this one . .  the veritable painted ship on a painted ocean where work seems like the pleasantest dance to the best music on the planet.  This one’s got an intriguing ambient sound as sound track too.   All Venezia and as they are called in Italian . . . rimorchiatori aka tugs.

And it’s a joy to post Colin Syndercombe’s tugster debut here . . . MV  Kovambo.  It’s a dredge vessel that brings up — are you ready for this –

diamonds!  As in the many carated type.  Click here for info on the vessel and here for info on the enterprise.  Here’s more on marine mining and subsea crawlers.  I have to admit I’ve never understood the appeal of diamonds, but my interest ratchets up a bit learning with this.

Colin’s second ever foto shows New Spirit foreground with a befogged Table Mountain behind.  Look for a detail on the mountain upper right side.

It’s the cable car peering from behind a rip in the “table cloth.”

And thanks to Isaac, does this look long?  How long?

It’s a 1000′ ITB aka integrated tug and barge.”  One thousand!  Here’s a foto of the tug out of the notch.  Technically the barge is 947′ and the tug is 153,’  and  in ITB math, that totals up to an even 1000.’  The gray vessel in the background is Tecumseh, 1973, ex-Sugar Islander, which appeared here in March.

xAnd finally . . . it’s always a delight to share fotos John Watson takes from his perch high above the east end of the KVK.   First, it’s a shockingly container-light Iwaki . . .

and a thought-provoking CSAV Suape.  Just five weeks ago, I got fotos of this vessel Pacific-bound about to exit the Panama Canal.  So what are the ports of call NOT listed here . . .?

Many thanks Maureen, Colin, Isaac, and John.  Info on Emilio Panfido, Netherlands-built can be found here; Carlo, Italian-built here.

Partners in Preservation is a New York program, but there’s no need to live in NY or even North America to vote.  Click on the logo below, register, scroll thru to find “Tug Pegasus and Waterfront Museum Barge,”  and vote once a day through May 21.  Ask your friends to vote too.

Ten weeks ago I did this post about Kraken–the best named vessel in the sixth boro.  That day, I sat on the west shore of Bayonne looking at Elizabeth.  But yesterday . . . with many thanks to Frank Belesimo, VP  of  Cashman Dredging, I got onto the water for a close-up tour of the Kraken and masterful description of how it works.   Here we approach the boat with our backs to Bayonne.  That’s St. Patrick’s Church to the right.  The red tug is Jay Michael (1980).

The orange /red tint to the water speaks of the red clay soil of the area as well as

the cords that conduct the blast signal into the charges placed below.

Three bore-platforms operate along a rail, drilling into the bottom and placing the charges.

In the background on the Elizabethport shore is the huge now-defunct Singer plant.

This is intense work.

Moving inside the house, notice Elizabeth Marine Terminal/Port Newark in the background, along with the peninsula of Bayonne and the cliffs of Manhattan beyond.   And on the line stretched betwen bore-platforms, those nodes at the end of each orange signal cord will

ultimately be clipped together so that when the time comes, a coordinated blast will occur down below, cracking up the

whatever hard bottom material needs to be taken away to reach the contracted depth.

More on this dredging project later.  All fotos by Will Van Dorp; getting the tour the same day the Shuttle flew over . . . I positive NASA wanted a close-up view of the project as well.

This foto shortchanges both Porto–container vessel at Howland Hook–and whatever aircraft flies above it.  Which aircraft . . . you may wonder?

This one!!  Or these ones.

Astride the Boeing’s shoulders is OV-101, the engineless shuttle that never entered space, escorted

by a T-38 chase plane.

They checked out the Bayonne Bridge and

scoped out progress on the still second-tallest building in Manhattan,

as closeup as they could . . .

and flew over Newark Liberty International before landing at Kennedy.  The foto below is a clue to my special platform for these shots . . . to be revealed tomorrow.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Check out John Skelson’s fotos here.  And great landing fotos here by John Huntington.  Still more here by Mai Armstrong.

Ultimately,Enterprise will be barged upriver and be preserved as part of the Intrepid Sea, Air, and Space Museum.  To make room for OV-101, the museum has sent three aircraft upriver, literally: MiG-15, a Douglas F-3D Skyknight, and a Supermarine Scimitar.  To see them barging upriver to ESAM, be at the Waterford Flight of Five tomorrow.

And on the subject of preservation, a request . . . tug Pegasus and Lehigh Valley 79 need your vote to demonstrate the power of social media and, thereby, win a grant.  Vote DAILY!!

Click on the logo below, register, scroll thru to find “Tug Pegasus and Waterfront Museum Barge,”  and vote once a day through May 21.  Ask your friends to vote too.

 

Chain link fence topped by accordion razor wire coils stand exposed only after a solid steel door is raised and an even heavier drawbridge lowered . . .   what is this?

And what lurks toothily below in the moat that’s most certainly there?

Salish Sea water, of course.  Many thanks to John Van Staalduinen who snapped these fotos at the port in Tacoma.  Both vessels were launched in Bath, ME in 1976.

Unrelated . . .  Grande Marocco left not quite a week ago for  . . . Dakar.  With all those cars up on the top splash deck (monkey deck??), I’m left wondering  . .  among other things . .

about a North American portion to a Dakar Rally.  I know some people who would welcome the addition of a North American component to that race.

I’m wondering what Grimaldi ships to places like Cotonou and Banjul in West Africa.

Graphics on ships . . .  if Charles Fazzino has been designated official artist of OpSail NY 2012, I wonder if we can expect designs like these on tall ships in less than a month . ..   How did he get chosen?  By whom?  To what end?  Who else was considered?

And one more from the north coast by Michigan Exposures . . . who might be planning a foray into the sixth boro . . . it’s Arthur  M. Anderson.  If Titanic had its Carpathia, then Edmund Fitzgerald had its Arthur . . . unfortunately too late.  I love the mild-dazzle paint on these vessels.  Arthur is a product of the American Ship Building Company yard in Lorain, OH . . . another manufacturing center transformed into  . .  housing.   If you don’t know the Lightfoot Fitzgerald song, here’s the link.   Otherwise, check out this supremely moody foto of a laker.

Thanks to John, John, and Ken for these fotos.  There are even two here by me.

Yesterday I posted a foto of JoAnne Reinauer III:  there was a 1 and then the 3 . . . I wonder what happened to 2.  Not so with Maurania.  I just looked and there was a 1 and a 2.   Maurania 2 was launched in Brooklyn in 1952 and still operates in New London as Towmaster.

Maurania was built in Delaware in 1925.  Click here to see her beefy hull on a beach after Hurricane Carol.

Maurania sounds like it’s the name of a country in Africa . . . but sorry:  it exists only in science fiction.  A beach in Mauretania is home to

one of the world’s largest ship graveyards.  Here and here are some recent tugster fotos of Maurania III.  Now what I want to know is  . . . what became of the golden eagle that used to adorn her house . . . .

Unrelated:  Two HUGE objects are Thialf, here floating into Rotterdam . ..  and here .. . the way to move ship’s propellors quickly from a Bahamian warehouse to an Italian shipyard.

And for some small floating objects to offset the huge, consider these ocean-going vessels from a recent post from a Brooklynite on Ice.

Tugboats in the sixth boro of New York City vary not quite infinitely, but almost.   Consider Pegasus (1907)here with Lehigh Valley 79 (1914) alongside.  And my social medium tells me they’re about to link up and travel again soon.    Watch Pier 25.

And Coral Coast (1970) versus its fleetmate,

and newest tugboat in the boro .  .  . Discovery Coast (2012).

Amy C. McAllister (1975) and

Bohemia (2007).

Taurus (1979) and

James Turecamo (1969) along assisting Scott Turecamo (1998).

Thornton Brothers (1958),

Caitlin Ann (1961), and

Maria J (1958).

Rounding it all out . . . is JoAnne Reinauer III (1970), here passing the unmistakeable Torm-orange house of Torm Thames (2005), and see this spotlight by selfabsorbedboomer.

Having called this set almost infinitely varied, I must say there’s NOTHING operating in the sixth boro quite an unusual as Joseph Thompson Jr. (portions from 1944), the tug portion of an ATM unit currently working the North Coast between US and Canadian ports.   Thank’s to Isaac Pennock aka tugboathunter for introducing me to this vessel;  For the dizzying set of transformations, read the bio by boatnerd here . . . and follow the fotos, especially the ones by Mark Vander Meulen, Steve Hause, Lee Rowe, and Rod Burdick.

Foto of Discovery Coast by Joel Milton;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

I used this title over four years ago here, although in that case, I wrote about a South African vessel in the sixth boro.

I offer this post partly as a study of how ship preservation is happening in another port city on the Atlantic, almost 8000 miles away.  South African Railway and Harbours (SAR & H) had Alwyn Vintcent built in Italy in the late 1950s as part of an order of five.  Find a brief  history here, but basically, she retired in 1983;  from 1991 until 2001 she operated as a steam excursion tug in Cape Town.   Her future then became uncertain.   A farmers group (most of the site is in Afrikaans ) (this one is in English) purchased her in 2010 or 2011 and is now preparing to move her 60+ miles inland for restoration and eventual use on a freshwater reservoir.

To make the trek inland, the superstructure must be cut down to a maximum of 14′ .  Stack goes first.  See more fotos and English text of this prep-to-trek here.

Vessel also needs to be lightened.

Although the road trip is schedule for May 2012, all’s not well until it’s well.  In the mid-1980s, another group attempt to preserve Alwyn’s sister ship J. E. Eaglesham by moving her inland.

The trip was sucessful, but later she was scrapped.   More fotos of that trek are here.

Part of what sent me on this virtual South African foray was learning yesterday from a reader there named Colin that bark Europa was currently in Cape Town preparing to voyage up to St Malo, and berths were still available.   The St. Malo voyage will make stops in Ascension and Azores.   More info on 1911 bark Europa here.

For other historical South African vessels, click here.  A mix of current and historical can be found here.

May is National Preservation Month.

All fotos used with permission.

It’s been over a year since I’ve used this title . . .  I worry sometimes that someone I catch in the act of working might feel intruded upon. Such is the farthest thing from my intention.  I’m certainly not the first or last to state there’s dignity in labor, whether it’s performed indoors or out.

Here Doubleskin 37 approaches NYK Rumina (named for the goddess of breast-feeding mothers!!!) as

day breaks to refill

the bunker tanks;  Coral Coast (1970, McDermott, and attractive) in pushgear.

Green Bay shuttles between dredge and

shore, throaty as she pushes water.

Paul Andrew seems headed for a shore base as well,

as Sarah Ann heads for Newark Bay

with a deck barge.

Scott Turecamo pushes New Hampshire into the interior of Arthur Kill land.

And Maria J moves a crane barge in

the same direction.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who’s mindful that for every member of the crew outside, there are possibly four inside.

Thursday morning after I’d caught the fotos of Patrice McAllister arriving, I headed for work, stopping at the Arthur Kill for a few moments to ingest the morning beauty.  Meanwhile,

in another part of the sixth boro, bowsprite and her assistants caught the re-enacter vessel Balmoral arriving in the North River.  Here’s Huffington Post text/fotos from the Balmoral point of view, with a few details on ticket prices.  That’s the Holland Tunnel vent on the Jersey side extreme right.  Here’s a tribute to the designers and builders, and here’s a great archival shot of the ventilator construction during the decade and a little following the 1912 Titanic trauma.

Justin Zizes caught this foto of Balmoral departing yesterday.  Had Titanic not had its iceberg encounter, its departure would have occurred with very little fanfare.

From Staten Island, John Watson caught this shot of Balmoral‘s departure.   As of this writing, she’s already passing between Martha’s Vineyard and Cape Cod.  John pointed out Balmoral was previously Norwegian Crown, launched 1988.   It received a significant implant in 2008.   The vessel’s namesake is in Scotland.

The other Titanic cruiser in the harbor this week was Azamara Journey.  And as of this morning Azamara Journey is SE of Cape Cod due south of Greenland.

Thanks to bowsprite, John Watson, and Justin Zizes for these fotos.

To turn from lost vessels celebrated to existing historic ones ignored, here’s an article from the NYTimes about last pleas for a home for Mary Whalen.

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My job . . . Summer 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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