I introduced the term aframax here four and a half years ago.  Relative to the sixth boro and the Kills, it means BIG, although by no means big by global standards.  At 113,043 DWT, Southern Spirit is a minor vessel in relation to the now scrapped Knock Nevis (564,763 DWT) or also-scrapped Batillus (553,662 DWT).

No matter, in the frigid 21-degree morning today, finger almost too cold to trigger the shutter, I felt warmed to see her glide in, with Gramma Lee T. Moran assisting.  Doubleclick enlarges.

In my observation, not many vessels navigate with KVK with a 5100-hp vector like Gramma Lee at the ready like this.  Here’s a 2002 article about the background and training of the first captain of Gramma Lee.

Spotting the assist was Catherine Turecamo, astern of Gramma Lee.

On a cold winter day, this is what the promise of heat looks like.  Can anyone help me figure out where this cargo–if it be crude–exited the earth?

As to promise of heat, if I were crew on watch, I’d be hoping for hot soup for lunch.

All fotos today by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s a post I did five years ago with info on suezmax and capesize vessels and a foto of a very young tugster.

Unrelated:  For a mariner’s reaction to the Costa Concordia collision with Isola del Giglio, read Hawsepiper Paul here. Another mariner, Peter Boucher of Nautical Log, weighs in here.  I had the pleasure of meeting Peter last summer in Florida.

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