Any guesses?  Something new at Coney Island?

Here’s a slightly different angle.

Different vessel but this foto’s dedicated to Paul Strubeck, who may just decide he needs to go shopping, eh, Paul?

Those horns signal the approach of Remember When, yesterday docked in North Cove, Manhattan.  That’s the Winter Garden just beyond the bow.  Thanks to Harold Tartell, see her invisible parts here.

Here’s Remember When entering the harbor a few days back.

I’m intrigued about this vessel;  when it entered the harbor two weeks back, I couldn’t find a name or anything anywhere.  Anyone know?

Enter yacht Kiwi, from Boston.

This was my first time to see this stylish boat by Ken’s Marine.  Seriously, in this post, this is the first vessel I could truly envy.  Bravo, Ken.    Name?

And this orange vessel . . . it was too far away to identify when I spotted it and took this foto.  Anyone identify?  It was headed for the George Washington Bridge when I took this.

So back to the two first shots . . . they showed the spars of the dynarig aboard Maltese Falcon, built in Turkey.    Maltese Falcon sports 15 square-rigged sails stored in and automatically deployed from the three free-standing masts.

You might call Maltese Falcon today a “used yacht,” not that that would diminish the vessel:  it was completed for Tom Perkins in 2006, who in turn sold it to Elena Ambrosiadou in 2009.  I’d love to see it under sail.  If I put details together in those links, Perkins launched the vessel in 2006 after investing about $200 million and sold it three years later for about $100 million?  Depreciation?  Poor math on somebody’s part?  Has anyone read Mine’s Bigger. .  about the building of this vessel?

Maltese Falcon’s presence in town  brings to two of the three largest sailing yachts in the world bathing in the sixth boro in May 2011.  Word of the sixth boro must be getting out there.  Now you can call Maltese Falcon a yacht, or a second-hand houseboat . . .  but it does rank right up there with the most exotic houseboats in the world, those on Dal Lake in India.

Bottom foto here thanks to Saskia deRothschild;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated but tied to yesterday’s book tip post, gCaptain’s John Konrad has been doing some fantastic posts recently–as most of you probably know.  My favorites related to the anniversary of Deepwater Horizon tragedy and great fotos on the ice in the Arctic.

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