Three years ago I felt the Pow Wow was my headwaters, and it still floods my head and soul with freshness, but I have moved on, find centering in other waters now.  So I should call this post Merrimack watershed, but …  next time.

Also, notice a new tugster feature . . . flickr on the sidebar.  I’ve avoided overlap of fotos there and here.

Songfrog:  my invented term this trip.  They really do sing, so why not give them as much credit as we do birds?  For frog mating protocols, click here.  Notice all the pollen on the water surface.  Peepers:  songfrogs’ castrati accompaniment, longed for here.

Redwing blackbird:  if I had to choose one birdsong as soundtrack for my life, this would be it.  Know it?

Stunning beauty . . . the most beautiful flower on earth .  . . the watery part of earth, that is.

The elusive young beaver:  I spotted this one or its siblings again and again but got no closer than this.  They do share stealth with bigfoot.  For all you ever wanted to know about beaver life, check here.

Dragonflies:  a personal quest this trip.

A biologist of the anisoptera variety would spend an entire lifetime studying these ancient critters.  On the Pow Wow around midday, they come out by the millions.  Only if you’re curious about the mechanics of their mating should you read this unromantic detail here.

Young’uns and … dinner for the big’uns.

Elizabeth … when she’s fed up with the city.

And full frontal tugster . . . nothing about nudity here.  Said Elizabeth, “Why would you pose this way?”

“Because I can,” replied tugster.  Really, he’s something of a songfrog sometime.

The blog will have a lot of guest gallivant bloggers this week because next week, I will be locked away in the wilds of Brooklyn . . . training not detention.  Actually, one goal with tugster (the blog) is to turn it over to guest-bloggers periodically, to broaden the perspective.

Thanks for reading.  All fotos but the last one by Will Van Dorp.

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