I’m not talking about the identification number that all mass-produced boats since 1972 carry.  Nah . . .  and I’m only tangentially referring to the dimensions of this aframax lighter called Eagle Beaumont or her sisters.   Nor do I mean hull speed number.  For Eagle Beaumont, whom I’ll call EB  [I like Les' suggestion to re-dub her E-Beau to distinguish her from similarly named sisters.],  some

of those numbers are as follows:  830′ x 144′ beam and 42′ draft, with big throbbing B&W power . . . whose measures I do not know.  Built in 1996, EB carries a max of 99,448 tons of crude, usually transferred into her holds from a larger tanker off-shore . .  if I understand this right.  For this reason, EB brings in a fresh load of crude more regularly than would be the case if she were loaded near the point of origin, i.e., a wellhead.  In the foto above and directly below, EB looks long and lean, svelte even.

Turning the angle, however, and the same vessel seems rather . . . more . . . uh .  . zaftig, like the last painting below.

And the same is true if we get a full frontal peek.  She is full.  But, female or male, we all have certain angles

that serve our needs although from which we’d rather not be seen.   Pfffft!  EB, your beauty just glows and warms me and all the waters in the Kills, and I love that.  You’ve told me a whole lot more already than AO ever did.

EB, you are the best EB you can be, and count me as a fan as you safely float into the harbor what stuff we need.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  Escort tug is definitely Marjorie B to port and to starboard, was it Sisters?

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