Judging by the boat color and name, I’d like to meet the owner.  And if in the course of a morning’s work, I crossed paths with this boat, I’d suggest we take a break, tie up, and drink something hot.  Dog & I in Gloucester harbor.

Bugs-r-us . . . a perfect name for a lobster boat, this one just north of New Hampshire’s Hampton River.

Rick over at Old Salt Blog gave clear instructions on changing a vessel’s name; I trust this name change happened with utmost respect for Poseidon’s rules.

Thomas Hoppe (His Chinese junk site is here.) sent along the following translation of the name of the gray tanker’s bow:  Changhang means steady shipping or long-distance shipping and is the name of the shipping company or charterer.  Then follows tansuo as second part of the ships name, that means to probe into, investigate, study.  So the whole name means  “Investigation, Probing into (of the)  Changhang (Company).”  Hmmm.  Margaret Moran just attends to business.

I enjoy seeing foreign language script on vessels, as is the case with Jag Prerana of Great Eastern Shipping.  And Miriam Moran just attends to business.

Anyone else see the eyes conveyed by the portside hawses?    Mysterious.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated:  December 5 is Sinterklaas Dag.  Check your shoes in the morning.

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