I’m praying for perfect light on Sunday afternoon when a public viewing of the barges is scheduled on Governors Island.  PortSide NewYork offers this downloadable guide to the barges, Red Hook, and its Dutch history here.  If you have a chance to get there, the details of these vessels will reward you.  For this month from an on-barge perspective, check out the blog maintained by Arjen Wapenaar, captain of Sterre, the 1887 tjalk;  although the text is in Dutch, the pics are great.

I’ve always been taken by leeboards (aka zwaarden), but I’ve developed a new interest in the rudders:  large and exuberant.  And it seems the Dutch themselves love the rudders, transforming a component that could be just functional to  Rudders with a passion for  . . . being rudders.  Notice the size the rudder (aka roer) on the 1888 tjalk Vrouwe Cornelia (Lady Cornelia).

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And the decoration, which I offer to the readers over at Neversealand.

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The rudder on Lemsteraak Sydsulver includes a boarding ladder and a flag bracket.

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The rudder on Groene Vecht dwarfs the tillerman.

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And all that beautiful wood begs for paint and carving tools.

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I’d like to know the various types of wood used in these rudders, like this dark wood on Groenling (green finch).

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I’m looking forward to the viewing on Sunday not only for more rudders but also other details:  mast, rigging, houses, blocks, bowsprits, etc.  Check out the boom (giek) support on Windroos, the hoogaars.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  Off to Waterford now.

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