In mid-August 1609 Robert Juet wrote in the log of Half Moon–that Half Moon– . . “we killed an extraordinary fish . . .”  Nothing more in the way of explanation or description or taste did he write.  That makes me want to speculate all night and all day . . and start a game like . .  what extraordinary thing else might they have killed or at least experienced.  Check out the extraordinary catch I witnessed today in the KVK.  They pull and

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they strain and

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bring up a most extraordinary . . . cement block.  “Part of a sediment sampling monitoring program,” I hear.  Although Kenneth Biglane is a locally-based EPA vessel,  I’ve never seen it until today.  Incidentally, the vessel’s namesake studied oil spill containment in many places including the Torrey Canyon spill in 1967.

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Earlier in the morning, a most extraordinary orange boat, previously depicted on this blog, crisscrosses the KVK as part of a sampling of sediments, I’m told, that

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are no longer there as well as what’s left below where the silt is no longer there . . . or something.  Michele Jeanne sampled away until it had to get out of Sea Miror‘s way, and then

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Tomorrow, another day, I’ll go off in search of more extraordinary . . . .  Join along?  By the way, Sea Miror is ex-Maritime Pearl, 1990.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

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