“Ship of the Day,” on my blogroll over a year now, states as goal to “concentrate on ships entering the Port of Rotterdam on that same day.”  That blog does that one ship per day.  The vessels in this post represent only a small percentage of ships that have moved through the sixth boro in the past week.

Intriguing was Pacific Winner, not only because of its place of registry– Chile–but also because  of its

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its previous name:  Republica dei Pisa.  A ship named for a city with a “listing” tower would make me nervous.  Here she clears the Bayonne Bridge.

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Maersk Matsuyama, launched from the Onomichi yard in Hiroshima a mere nine months ago, clears Bergen Point with assistance from Marjorie McAllister, recently featured here as having a wheelhouse on a stalk, retracted here.

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Sichem Manila swings back NW in the Con Hook Reach.

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Notwithstanding all this focus these days on the Dutch, Westerhaven arrives in the Bay at dawn and pushes up to the Buttermilk Channel unheralded.  Earlier this year it autopiloted itself onto a reef off Belize.  In spite of its name, Westerhaven runs largely between North and South America.  On or about 31 August, Flinterduin is expected to arrive in boro6 with a cargo of 20 traditional Dutch sailing barges.  How about an impromptu contest to get fotos . . . I could devise some incentive ideas . . . .

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Energy Challenger at the dock at IMTT, less than a month after working in the Baltic.

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Eagle Beaumont, one of the Eagle fleet I sported with a year ago, is registered in Singapore although it’s part of a fleet called “American Eagle.”

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Blue Jade, beautiful name although somewhat unexpected for a tanker.  It sounds more appropriate for a drink or a restaurant, but it’s actually Korean-owned and Swiss-managed.  More Blue Jade soon.

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NS Power, offloads in the Arthur Kill.  NS is short for Novorossiysk, a Black Sea city.

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Ships in, ships out . . . I never tire of it, of watching it.  I also think it strange that these international machines moving over the watery parts of the entire globe, mostly have English names.  Or even if the name refers to a place so far from yet accessible to the sixth boro, their names are written in English.

All fotos here by Will Van Dorp.

Reminder:  Flinterduin . . . 31 August . . . I’d love a pic.  It’ll be headed through the Narrows and then into the East River.

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