This starts a new series . . . actually all those “random” tugs in the series that went up to 39 (use the search window to trace’em back) were never really random either.  But these . . . this new series . . . I won’t even pretend are “random.”  Like this Pegasus . . . I’ll have to consult with my dear friend of VHF vigilance (or anyone else) to learn how interaction of the airways distinguishes this Pegasus shown here in mid-KVK from the 1907 one.

aanupeg

With the next two I respond to mijn vriend zeebart, the irreverant skipper of a North Sea anchor-handling tug who has looow tolerance for the unusual, especially with respect to necks  . . . or upper wheelhouses.   I’ve never seen this Curtis Reinauer configuration before myself.  Was watch posted  here for unexpected weather or other skyward phenomena?

aacrtr

Bart . . . if you’re going to have fun with what-you-call strange in North American design, at least get some better fotos.  And yin agrees with my yang there.  Were Barbara C. and Robert J. engaging in some peculiar springtime mating dance?

aabcrjb

Evening Tide, featured here many times already, sports a swan-mimicking curved neck you should just looove, Bart.

aaaaaet

Finally, dedicated to one of the finest wits of the sixth boro, a gent I have utmost respect for, he of the red cap in this foto, the artist who recently sent along a foto he called “sisters of darkness,” of McAllister Sisters on its way to a dawn rendezvous with Iwo Jima, here’s a shot I’ll call sisters of light . . . or maybe sisters of reflection.

aamsist

More non-random tugs surely to follow.

All fotos here by Will Van Dorp.

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